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Spectropop - Digest Number 427




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                       Special Disc Jockey Record
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There are 25 messages in this issue of Spectropop.

Topics in this Digest Number 427:

      1. Re: Mark Wirtz/Tomorrow
           From: Bob Rashkow 
      2. Are you a boy or are you a girl?
           From: "James F.  Cassidy" 
      3. Re: Rainy Day Bells
           From: Mark Frumento 
      4. Re: Let's Dance
           From: Will George 
      5. Re: The Ashes
           From: "Peter Lerner" 
      6. Re: Mark Wirtz/Tomorrow
           From: Michael Sinclair 
      7. Re: "toy-town"
           From: Mark Frumento 
      8. Emerald City Bandits, shooting again!
           From: "Martin Roberts" 
      9. Re: Girly-Groups on Top
           From: "Jan Kristensen" 
     10. Randy Newman: 2002 Oscar winner
           From: Michael Edwards 
     11. Hedy Sontag - He Never Came Back
           From: Michael Edwards 
     12. Re: Tomorrow/Marvin, Welch and Farrar
           From: Mark Frumento 
     13. Jerry Ross/Shocking Blue/Abba
           From: Frank Youngwerth 
     14. Re: Pop Icons
           From: "Jan Kristensen" 
     15. RE: Let's Dance!
           From: Mike Demers 
     16. Re: Let's Dance!
           From: Gene Sculatti 
     17. Regional Radio Hits
           From: "Jeff Lemlich" 
     18. The One & Only Jack Scott !
           From: Tony Baylis 
     19. Re: Tomorrow/Marvin, Welch and Farrar + ABBA
           From: Mark Wirtz 
     20. Re: "Ice Cream Man" / Clover
           From: Mark Wirtz 
     21. Re: Emerald City Bandits, shooting again!
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
     22. Re: "Ice Cream Man" / Clover/Abba
           From: Mark Frumento 
     23. Re: "Ice Cream Man" /Huey Lewis
           From: Mark Wirtz 
     24. Randy Newman Gems
           From: James Botticelli 
     25. More Gems
           From: James Botticelli 


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Message: 1
   Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2002 20:19:19 -0000
   From: Bob Rashkow 
Subject: Re: Mark Wirtz/Tomorrow

--- In spectropop, Will George  wrote:

> 
> Is [Tomorrow the same band that Olivia Newton-John was
> a member member of?

I believe N-J's group spelled it "Toomorrow" and was a
different group produced here in the States by Don
Kirshner, they're on my want list but I've never heard
their 1 or 2 singles--The Bobster

toomorrow with Olivia Newton-John



-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 2
   Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 08:55:11 -0500
   From: "James F.  Cassidy" 
Subject: Are you a boy or are you a girl?

About the German "Girly Groups on Top" collection, Brian
Davy wrote:

<snip> ... the real outsider on the album has to be "Get a
Job" by the Silhouettes! <snip>

That "-ettes" on the end must have thrown them off...

Jim Cassidy


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 3
   Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2002 09:07:46 -0500
   From: Mark Frumento 
Subject: Re: Rainy Day Bells

> Agreed..."Rainy Day Bells" is one of the greatest
> doo-wops ever.

I take it that this RDB, the bubblegum song.... is the
same song as done by the great Norman Fox.

If so... I wonder how Medowlark's voice compairs to
Norman's. Can anyone report?


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 4
   Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 10:38:25 EST
   From: Will George 
Subject: Re: Let's Dance

The songs that always insist I dance are What I Like About
You by the Romantics, and Love Shack by The B-52s.  And
some classic disco songs are always a good bet. 

Bill


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 5
   Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2002 16:16:15 -0000
   From: "Peter Lerner" 
Subject: Re: The Ashes

Phil kindly asked me:
>
> >I only know of one DeCaro / DeShannon song but what a song
> >- Is there anything I can do, recorded by The Ashes.
>
> Peter, is there anything else you know about this record?
> It's a great little tune, and I can't believe it's the
> only version. The 45 credits Larry Levine with the
> engineering, and it has *that* sound. The flip, "Every
> Little Prayer", is interesting too, a male lead, and a
> drum intro with more or less the same sound and content
> as the Ronettes "Oh I Love You". I just played both sides
> at musica for inspection.

Phil, this is such a great 45, part of the innocent first
days of "folk-rock" before things got so heavy and so
clever. A lovely understated song with one of those
taking-you-completely-by-surprise sudden changes to a
minor key, that Jackie DeShannon had developed with Jimmy
Page.

Yes, the b-side "Every little prayer" (written by Ed
Fournier - a familiar name that I can't quite place) is
out of the same mould. The 45 (Vault 924) was produced by
Richard Delvy (who can tell us anything about him?) and
engineered by Larry Levine.

I also own a mono / stereo promo copy of Vault 973, also
by the Ashes, a cover of Paul Simon's Homeward Bound. A
"Wenesday's Child Production", it's nothing special.

Peter


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Message: 6
   Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2002 10:43:23 -0800 (PST)
   From: Michael Sinclair 
Subject: Re: Mark Wirtz/Tomorrow

--- Will George wrote:

> Is [Tomorrow] the same band that Olivia Newton-John was a
> member of?
> 
Bill,

The answer to your question is "no," but you are asking a
most appropriate question. You must be the only person I
have ever come acrosss this side of the 60's that actually
knows, or remembers, the "Tomorrow" group that featured
Olivia Newton John managed and produced by one of the
"Shadows" (who was also in a relationship with Olivia - if
I am not mistaken, they were even married for a brief time).
A kudo for you! The "Tomorrow" group I was involved with,
however was from a totally different musical ilk -
psychedelic Rock.

Tomorrow

Anyway, thanks for the mail and question.

Best,
Mark (Wirtz)


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Message: 7
   Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2002 09:34:58 -0500
   From: Mark Frumento 
Subject: Re: "toy-town"

> Please elaborate on this "toy-town" sub genre.

I'm not sure that the name was meant the be complimentary
at all. But it seems have been coined to describe some of
the British pop that was being released from about
1967-1968. Compilers like Phil Smee and others discovered
(or rediscovered) a whole vein catchy pop songs and I
guess someone put a name to it... as usually happens....

The best way to describe it is the following: bouncy beat,
extremely catchy melody (certainly strong hooks required
in the chorus), storybook lyrics (or an everyday kind of
lyric i.e. Penny Lane), and a many times a piano based
production (decending bass lines are a plus) though a
piano is not required. In it's strictest form I suppose
the storybook lyrics are what makes these songs toy-town.
Children singining in the chorus (i.e. "Excerpt From A
Teenage Opera") adds to the toy-town flavor but is not
required. Toy-town has a close link to bubblegum but
usually the melodies and production are more complicated.
and I don't think that most toy-town songs were targeting
kids as the audience.

Of course Alice in Wonderland featured very strongly in
British pop during the late 60s... probably contributing
to the abundance of similar themes.

I will play a song to musica called "Toyland" by The Alan
Bown... probably the purest example of British toy-town.


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Message: 8
   Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2002 22:43:44 -0000
   From: "Martin Roberts" 
Subject: Emerald City Bandits, shooting again!

Many moons ago Country Paul related information on his
chat with Don Drowty:-

> Don also did a 1962 single on Philips with Dean Torrance
> as the "Emerald City Ramblers" called "Full Blown Caddy."

I found this snippet of info one of the reasons I so love
Spectropop, maybe I've missed it but I'd never heard of
Dean singing on this record. I did wonder how it sounded.
The answer is pretty damned good!

Actual credits are The Emerald City Bandits "Full Blown
Caddy" wr. Don Drowty/"Come On Oz" Philips 40197 '64-a
typical (not many things in life more fun than a 'typical'
Beach Boys, Gary Usher, Jan & Dean styled) Hot Rod rocker,
revving engines, screeching tyres, crunching guitars,
honking sax, "aaah's" and "wind em up, wind em" up vocal
refrains. Good? Well it's made me want to jump into my
souped up Morris Minor van and go for a burn-up!!

Can't brag I've got the 45, it's on one of the better
'unofficial' releases (you know the sort, good quality
recordings, sleeve notes and credits. Put together by folk
who don't just seem to be after a quick buck.) "Wail On
The Beach..16 Hot Rod & Surf Sizzlers" Satan LP 1004. I
also have the later CD release, which featured another
LP's tracks. Can I Find it? Nope!

Can I hear Dean singing on it? Nope, but then I can't hear
Dean singing on Jan & Dean's records either! I'll leave
that to the 'voice experts' to decide.


Martin


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Message: 9
   Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 18:25:11 +0100
   From: "Jan Kristensen" 
Subject: Re: Girly-Groups on Top

I got "Just tell him Jane said hello" on an Italian CD
called Rockin' Boppin' Girls vol 2 on Titanic TR CD 6000.

Jan K

----- Original Message from: "Brian Davy"

> ...does anyone know where I can get a CD version of
> Gerri Granger's recording of "Just Tell Him Jane Said
> Hello"?


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Message: 10
   Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2002 14:03:38 -0000
   From: Michael Edwards 
Subject: Randy Newman: 2002 Oscar winner

"Songwriter Randy Newman received a standing ovation when
he broke his Susan Lucci-like losing streak, winning his
first Academy Award for Best Original Song for "If I
Didn't Have You" from Monsters, Inc. after 16 nominations."
Going back to 1962, Randy penned a real nice ballad
recorded by the Fleetwoods, "They Tell Me Its Summer". It
appeared as the flipside of their top 40 hit, "Lovers By
Night, Strangers By Day". It's up on musica for a few days
so please give it a listen. It would make a great addition
to any summer tape/CD compilations that you may be putting
together. It's on the Very Best Of The Fleetwoods CD (EMI,
1993).


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 11
   Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2002 04:53:12 -0000
   From: Michael Edwards 
Subject: Hedy Sontag - He Never Came Back

I first heard this song on an 80s girl group compilation
album called simply "Gems". That album was a bare bones
affair with no information other than the song titles and
the artists. The cover featured a girl in a "mod" leather
jacket. Finally locating a copy of the 45, which I
[played] at musica, I note some awesome credentials. The
writers are Bob Crewe, Eddie Rambeau and Bud Rehak. Bob
Crewe did the production and Charlie Calello the
arrangement. It doesn't come much bluer chip than that. It
was released on US Philips in early '64, but has not yet
made it to CD. I was disappointed it wasn't included in
the Growin' Up Too Fast double CD, when Dusty and the
Secrets (both US Philips acts) were. You get to hear it in
all its scratchy vinyl glory. Check out the honking sax.
But who was Hedy Sontag?


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 12
   Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 18:20:30 -0500
   From: Mark Frumento 
Subject: Re: Tomorrow/Marvin, Welch and Farrar

> The answer to your question is "no," but you are asking a
> most appropriate question. You must be the only person I
> have ever come acrosss this side of the 60's that actually
> knows, or remembers, the "Tomorrow" group that featured
> Olivia Newton John managed and produced by one of the
> "Shadows" (who was also in a relationship with Olivia - if
> I am not mistaken, they were even married for a brief time).


If this is Bruce Welch you are talking about (I believe it
is) they were engaged. She broke it off, so the story goes.
Welch was also one third of the excellent, post- Shadows,
harmony pop group called Marvin, Welch and Farrar. The
three of them released some excellent songs and should
have been hit makers in their own right. Of course Marvin
being Hank Marvin.

Mark Frumento


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 13
   Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 12:48:04 EST
   From: Frank Youngwerth 
Subject: Jerry Ross/Shocking Blue/Abba

I bought the Jerry Ross Synposium Sequel CD on a whim a
couple years ago, and enjoy just about every track. I
didn't know Ross was behind the Dutch pop-rock chart
explosion of the early 70s, but it's interesting to
consider how important Shocking Blue may have been to Kurt
Cobain's early musical development. Early on Nirvana
covered SB's otherwise obscure "Love Buzz" from an LP Kurt
apparently owned and admired. Something set the guy apart
>from his grunge/punk contemporaries--he sure didn't get
his world-class hook sensibility from hanging out with the
Melvins!

I haven't seen any of the campy movies or the Broadway
show that have helped revive the popularity of Abba's
music, but I did go see the group's own The Movie when it
played at midnight here in Chicago, and I came back from
it convinced that, while probably not nearly as important
in a cultural/historical dimension, Abba didn't fall much
short of the Beatles (or anybody else), qualitatively or
quantitatively, at delivering wonderfully written,
produced and sung 3-minute songs, the primary medium for
Spectropop.

Frank Youngwerth
   


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Message: 14
   Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 18:15:02 +0100
   From: "Jan Kristensen" 
Subject: Re: Pop Icons

Back in 1958 a young 16 years old Norwegian heard My True
Love for the first time and became a  fan. For the next
3-4 years Jack Scott couldn't do anything wrong. He was
featured in my first try as a Rock journalist in a local
rag in 59 and I still have his records including an
obscure CD with 2 duets with Linda Scott. But I thought
he was born in 1938?

Jan K.

----- Original Message from: "Stone Jones"
>
> On January 26th, my pal Giovanni turned 66.  It was
> quite a party. Naturally it was a concert with a few
> hundred of his closest friends. Fittingly, it was at a
> club  called TBonz located a mile or so from the big
> barn near Detroit where he used to play regularly back
> in 1955 and helped to define what became known as Rock
> & Roll.
>
> Is he in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame?  No.  Should
> he be?  Of course I think so. Unfortunately there
> doesn't seem to be a clear and established criteria
> for
> Inductees.
>
> I have a suggestion.  How about this.
>
> If you are a Rock and Roll Singer who first charted in
> The 50s and have been able to support yourself and
> your family  singing Rock and Roll for at least
> 40 years.....you are automatically inducted.
>
> Check out
> http://www.rockabillyhall.com/JackScott.html



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Message: 15
   Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 09:23:01 -0800
   From: Mike Demers 
Subject: RE: Let's Dance!

At the risk of sounding too pscyhobabblesque, I think
that folks listen to music that reflects their emotional
needs (duh) - ABBA came out at a particular time and
filled a need for lightness in music just as AQUA has
recently (although AQUA has been much more of a parody
band).

Mike Demers

www.victoriahauntedhouse.com
 

-----Original Message from: Norman

> ...ABBA should not be discounted as an influence.  In as
> much as The Beatles had more dynamics attached to their
> persona, progressing at a time of substantial social
> change, ABBA have to be content with writing good pop
> songs without the social influence.
> 
> In as far as their music goes they were to the Seventies
> what The Beatles were to the Sixties.  One measure being
> how soon mainstream artists and other groups covered
> their songs.


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 16
   Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 09:46:54 -0800
   From: Gene Sculatti 
Subject: Re: Let's Dance!

And don't forget Bobby Fuller 4's LET HER DANCE and, on a
50s doowop tip, Norman Fox & the Rob Roys' LET HER DANCE.

Gene Sculatti


Bob Rashkow wrote:

a very partial list of suggestions:

> Keep On Dancing    Gentrys 1966   MGM
> Little Bit O' Soul       Music Explosion  1967  Laurie
> Hold On, I'm Comin'    Sam & Dave  1967  Stax
> (anything by Jay & The Techniques!  anything by the
> Animals! anything by the Grassroots!)
> Everybody          Tommy Roe  1963  ABC Paramount
> Little Miss Sad    Five Empressions  1965  Freeport
> Shake               Shadows of Knight  1968  Team
> Dance To The Music  Sly/Family Stone  1968  Epic
> Reach Out Of The Darkness    Friend/Lover  1968  Verve Forecast


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Message: 17
   Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 18:10:40 -0500
   From: "Jeff Lemlich" 
Subject: Regional Radio Hits

Great timing here!  I've just been putting together lists of WQAM and WFUN
local 60s hits that failed to reach the Billboard Hot 100.  The first two
installments are on my new Florida music forum:

http://pub64.ezboard.com/blimestonelounge

Go to the 60s Disc Jockeys & Radio Stations section

If that link doesn't work, you can go in through the front door:
http://www.limestonerecords.com
 then click on the MUSIC FORUM link.


Jeff Lemlich


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 18
   Date: Sat, 30 Mar 2002 00:20:54 -0000
   From: Tony Baylis 
Subject: The One & Only Jack Scott !

Warren Cosford says ..
> Is he in The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame?  No.  Should he
> be?  Of course I think so. Unfortunately there doesn't
> seem to be a clear and established criteria for
> Inductees.

Undoubtedly the omission of Jack from the Hall of Fame is
unexplainable and an omission that should be rectified if
the Hall of Fame is to be an honest listing of the Greats
of Rock & Roll. When an artist who first recorded in 1957,
(ABC Paramount) is still recording in the 90's (Curb
Records), then without doubt justice demands that he be
recognised for the years (decades) of pleasure he has
provided fans of solid, basic, Rock and Roll, and even
Country. While his chart years were (ouch) approximately
40 years ago, he sounds better today than when in his
heyday .. take a listen to his version of Running Scared
on Curb .. dare I say it? .. yep, it is superior to Roy
Orbison's hit.

Jack is not forgotten by rock and roll fans, only by the
Hall of Fame...

For a listing of Jack's 45 rpm singles see the url below ...
http://www.widomaker.com/~sabre/Scott1.htm


Tony Baylis


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 19
   Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 20:15:02 EST
   From: Mark Wirtz 
Subject: Re: Tomorrow/Marvin, Welch and Farrar + ABBA

In a message dated 3/29/02, Mark Frumento writes:

> If this is Bruce Welch you are talking about (I
> believe it is) they were engaged. She broke it off, so
> the story goes. Welch was also one third of the
> excellent, post- Shadows, harmony pop group called
> Marvin, Welch and Farrar. The three of them released
> some excellent songs and should have been hit makers
> in their own right. Of course Marvin being Hank Marvin.

Yes, it is indeed Bruce Welch to whom I referred. By the
way, wasn't Don Kirschner the "impresario" behind this
particular "Tomorrow" group?  Believe it, or not, I never
heard any of their recordings, and I'm curious - were
they any good? 

While Marvin, Welch and Farrar were indeed a darn good
harmony group, Bruce Welch ultimately made his
non-Shadows mark as the producer of some really cool
Cliff Richard recordings (one of which ALMOST broke Cliff
in the US - can't remember the title though).

RE ABBA - I am absolutely puzzled by this whole back and
forth dialogue about ABBA... were they vapid and
meaningless, or profound? To begin with, were THEIR early
simplistic, catchy tunes and recordings really THAT less
"substantial" than the Beatles' early hits? I mean, "She
Loves You, Yeah, Yeah," or "Waterloo," - come on, get
real - it's just POP MUSIC. POP standing for popular. And
on that note, considering ABBA's global POPularity, and
in the spirit of "you can't argue with success," arguing
the profundity of their music is about as futile as
arguing the profundity of chocolate, or Walt Disney. Sure,
some hate both, some get nauseated by their mere mention,
BUT - they have both made far too many people happy to
argue their validity. All that notwithstanding, can any
true, discerning pop music aficionado possibly not be
captivated by ABBA's later albums like, "Super Trouper"
and "The Visitors"? The material is most creative, the
vocal renditions superb, the musicianship outstanding,
the arrangements inventive and embracing, the production
and engineering nothing less than awesome. 

Regardless in which medium, do you know what makes a
"Star," more than talent, skill, or uniqueness (talent,
per se, is NOT what makes success, it merely sustains it
after the fact)? One word - CHARM. Don't believe me?
Check it out. Every "Star" in history radiated/radiates
that very seductive element. And, God knows, ABBA as
performers, as well as their music (not unlike the
Beatles), blazed with charm.

Best,

Mark (Wirtz)


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Message: 20
   Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 20:27:38 EST
   From: Mark Wirtz 
Subject: Re: "Ice Cream Man" / Clover

In a message dated 3/28/02, John Cook writes:

> There's a track called 'Ice Cream Man' by the band
> Clover. Not sure of the issue year, but I believe it's
> 1968. There are 2 versions, one of which, as has been
> noted before, sounds a lot like a 'Teenage Opera' style
> production- kids chorus, etc. Did you have any
> connection with this or is it a coincidence/possible
> homage to your efforts? 

Thank you for your question, John. In answer to it, no, I
had no connection with "Ice Cream Man," or Clover, and to
be quite honest, I had never heard of either.

Best,


Mark (Wirtz)


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 21
   Date: Sat, 30 Mar 2002 02:03:06 -0000
   From: Billy G. Spradlin 
Subject: Re: Emerald City Bandits, shooting again!

> Can I hear Dean singing on it? Nope, but then I can't hear
> Dean singing on Jan & Dean's records either! I'll leave
> that to the 'voice experts' to decide.

Dean Torrance DID sing on (almost?) all of J&D recordings,
usually falsetto. That's him doing the lead on "Linda" and
the Two Girls For Every Boy line on "Surf City". I saw
them in concert 4 years ago and he can still hit 'em.  

About the only J&D song I can think of that had neither J
or D singing on (besides those cool instrumentals and a
couple of Jan solos) was the LP track "Move Out Little
Mustang" which is Sloan- Barri and was released as a 45 on
Imperial as "The Rally Packs". How It wound up on a J&D
album the same way is a mystery.

Billy


PS: Can someone make an audio file of the Emerald City 
Bandits track?


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Message: 22
   Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 21:30:31 -0500
   From: Mark Frumento 
Subject: Re: "Ice Cream Man" / Clover/Abba

> Thank you for your question, John. In answer to it, no, I
> had no connection with "Ice Cream Man," or Clover, and to
> be quite honest, I had never heard of either.

This song was obviously influenced by Excerpt From a
Teenage Opera. The band was the same Clover that had Huey
Lewis (of the News) in it. They went on to back up Elvis
Costello on his first album and early recordings.

Ice Cream Man is quite fun but a little twisted too. It's
supposed to be about a man selling ice cream but it is
clearly not a ice cream he is selling. The children's
chorus is the main connection to EFATO.

> RE ABBA - I am absolutely puzzled by this whole back and
> forth dialogue about ABBA... were they vapid and
> meaningless, or profound? To begin with, were THEIR early
> simplistic, catchy tunes and recordings really THAT less
> "substantial" than the Beatles' early hits?

Agree with Mark's whole thought (only part of which I've
quoted here). Abba were a great group. Not sure if it
matters what your sensibilities are. You have to forget
the image they became. If they only ever put out the song
SOS they'd have done their share for pop music. As it is
they release plenty of substantial and extremely tuneful
songs.


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 23
   Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 21:57:46 EST
   From: Mark Wirtz 
Subject: Re: "Ice Cream Man" /Huey Lewis

In a message dated 3/29/02 9:15:43 PM, Mark writes:

> This song was obviously influenced by Excerpt From a
> Teenage Opera. The band was the same Clover that had
> Huey Lewis (of the News) in it. They went on to back up
> Elvis Costello on his first album and early recordings.

WOW! I REALLY like and respect Huey Lewis!! This I GOTTA
hear!!
   
 M:)


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Message: 24
   Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 22:41:45 EST
   From: James Botticelli 
Subject: Randy Newman Gems

In a message dated 3/29/02, Michael Edwards writes:

> Randy penned a real nice ballad
>recorded by the Fleetwoods, "They Tell Me Its Summer".

I have the 45 conincidentally, but that's not the point. I
wish to uncover Randy's gems...My gem came from 1964 and
was called "I Dont Want To Hear It Anymore" about a guy
who continually overhears through thin walls a
neighbor couple arguing. Jerry Butler blew my mind with
his interp. Any others?


Jimmy Botticelli
Taking the EZ..Way Out!


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 25
   Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2002 22:37:36 EST
   From: James Botticelli 
Subject: More Gems

In a message dated 3/29/02, Michael Edwards writes:

>I first heard this song on an 80s girl group compilation
>album called simply "Gems". That album was a bare bones
>affair with no information other than the song titles and
>the artists. The cover featured a girl in a "mod" leather
>jacket. 

There was a second volume of Gems as well. fidelity poor, 
esprit etait perfectimundo


Jimmy Botticelli
Taking the EZ..Way Out!


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
End


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