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Spectropop - Digest Number 423





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There are 9 messages in this issue of Spectropop.

Topics in this Digest Number 423:

      1. Re: Jimmie Rodgers; Hal Blaine; radio
           From: Paul Underwood 
      2. Re: You're No Good & "He Never Came Back"
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
      3. Let's Dance
           From: "David Feldman" 
      4. Re: R&B Neil and Howard
           From: "Robert Conway" 
      5. RE: Let's Dance!
           From: "Phil Chapman" 
      6. Re: You're No Good
           From: Mike Demers 
      7. Nilsson, Addrisi
           From: "Jack Madani" 
      8. Ronstadt, Peter's party, Randy Newman, TV, and more
           From: "Paul Payton" 
      9. Re: Nilsson, Addrisi
           From: Mark Frumento 


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Message: 1
   Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2002 10:25:56 +0100
   From: Paul Underwood 
Subject: Re: Jimmie Rodgers; Hal Blaine; radio

> Indeed, Mike. Very nice track - which puts me in mind of
> another folkie sound he had on Dot, although definitely in
> the pop vein; I forget which line is the title, but the
> chorus goes, "Please tell me if you can / What time to the
> trains roll in? / 2:10, 06 :15, 10:44." (With the verses, it
> works as music.
> 
It's another McKuen song "Doesn't anybody know my name"
(2.10 6.18). Tommy Roe did a very nice version of it. Paul


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 2
   Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2002 10:11:31 -0000
   From: Billy G. Spradlin 
Subject: Re: You're No Good & "He Never Came Back"

--- In Spectropop, "Robert Conway" wrote:

> Is no one taken with the young Linda Ronstadt's version
> of "You're No Good"? It certainly deserves mention.

I have heard that version since it was a hit the mid 70's
- it's since become an oldies and adult contemporary
radio staple. In fact I heard many classic oldies for the
first time as as a Rondstadt cover (I was a teenager in
the 1970's - 1980 high school graduate!) It wasnt until I
got into my late teens-early 20's and did some serious
listening to Oldies Stations (when most were still
programmed locally) till I heard the superior originals
of "Heat Wave" "Just One Look", "Ooh Baby Baby" and "Tell
Him". The only problem with her covers listening 20 years
later is that she always had a tendancy to belt out the
lyrics, and having "Laid Back" L.A. backing tracks and
production (though many feature Andrew Gold) doesn't help.

But I agree with others that Betty Everett's sly and
sassy version is the best. Dee Dee's version is bit too
upbeat and forceful for the lyric, I like the fuzzy
guitar solo though. 

BTW someone posted Hedy Sontag's - "He Never Came Back",
another great stomping production by Bob Crewe. Does
anyone have any artist/label info on her and a couple
other Crewe productions - The Candy Girls "Run" (is this
the Rag Dolls in disguise?) and Susan Lynne's - "Don't
Drag No More"


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 3
   Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2002 12:01:38 -0500
   From: "David Feldman" 
Subject: Let's Dance

On 26 Mar 2002, Spectropop wrote:

> Any help will be very gratefully received.

Just some general advice.  The biggest mistake for music
fanatics like us to make is to play obscure "finds" at an
event that is likely to be attended by mostly non-fanatics.
Better to play well known songs.

On the other hand, there is a difference between a song
that makes you tap your feet and a song that you want to
do serious dancing to.  For example, in my experience, "Do
You Love Me" or "Mickey's Monkey" work better than
"Dancing in the Street" or "Ain't Too Proud to Beg," which
are a little lethargic for dance purposes.

And yes, there should probably be some slow songs.  A
sizeable number of folks won't shake their booties
regardless of what song you play.


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 4
   Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2002 07:49:17 -0600
   From: "Robert Conway" 
Subject: Re: R&B Neil and Howard

Frank Youngwerth wrote:

>Didn't mean to knock the Archies, just that listening to
>two RKO album reissues a few months back left me colder
>than I'd have expected. Ron Dante is fine, but it doesn't
>mean much to me when I don't care to hear the song again.
>I don't know how "R&B" Neil and Howard are, but their
>melodies sure do make the 'trotters shine.

I really never got into the Archies, Banana Splits, etc. 
Same with the Globetrotters; however, your comment about
R&B Neil and Howard immediately hit me as Neil Sedaka and
Howie Greenfield.  Am I so out of it that this has
already been covered?    

Bob Conway


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 5
   Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2002 17:27:04 -0000
   From: "Phil Chapman" 
Subject: RE: Let's Dance!

 Peter:
>Karen has one stipulation too - nothing by Abba -
>but I'm sure Spectropoppers wouldn't have
>taken me there anyway!

Think again! In my experience, the one record that's
guaranteed to fill the floor with all ages is "Dancing
Queen".


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 6
   Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2002 09:46:37 -0800
   From: Mike Demers 
Subject: Re: You're No Good

 How about including some music recently written, but
definitely in the 60s vein - one such suggestion (and I
have no affiliation with this band) is a band from North
Vancouver in Canada - the song I would suggest is called
Motorcycle - find the song at
http://www.mp3.com/Starcollector

Mp3.com is becoming a place to not only find recent
recordings but I have noticed all sorts of artists
posting material recorded in the 60s and 70s but out of
distribution etc. - Just an idea - I think songs like
this could turn peoples heads at a wedding

Mike Demers


-----Original Message from: Billy G. Spradlin

I have heard that version since it was a hit the mid 70's
- its since become an oldies and adult contemporary radio
staple. In fact I heard many classic oldies for the first
time as as a Rondstadt cover (I was a teenager in the
1970's - 1980 high school graduate!) It wasnt until I got
into my late teens-early 20's and did some serious
listening to Oldies Stations (when most were still
programmed locally) till I heard the superior originals
of "Heat Wave" "Just One Look", "Ooh Baby Baby" and "Tell
Him". The only problem with her covers listening 20 years
later is that she always had a tendancy to belt out the
lyrics, and having "Laid Back" L.A. backing tracks and
production (though many feature Andrew Gold) doesnt help.

But I agree with others that Betty Everett's sly and
sassy version is the best. Dee Dee's version is bit too
upbeat and forceful for the lyric, I like the fuzzy
guitar solo though. 


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 7
   Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2002 08:47:56 -0500
   From: "Jack Madani" 
Subject: Nilsson, Addrisi

>Subject: Harry Nilsson?
>
>I always thought of Harry Nilsson as having been
>influenced by people like Brian Wilson, Paul McCartney etc.
>But when you look at the chronology it can appear the
>reverse may be true as well. There are so many distinct
>traits like the bouncy melody, the vocal style, the home
>spun lyrics etc in HN that I am wondering where it all
>came from.

>...sub-genre called "toy town". Is it possible that this and
>other ultra catchy pop stemmed from Harry Nilsson?

I don't mean to suggest anything definite here, but I
just recently got the Addrisi Brothers' 1972 album We've
Got To Get It On Again, and it sure does sound at times
like Harry Nilsson--the vocal quality, the way melody
takes a quirky turn.  Not the title track, but selections
like "Windy Wakefield" and "Twogether."

Album produced by Norbert Putnam, btw.

jack


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 8
   Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2002 16:54:13 -0500
   From: "Paul Payton" 
Subject: Ronstadt, Peter's party, Randy Newman, TV, and more

Robert Conway writes:

> Is no one taken with the young Linda Ronstadt's
> version of "You're No Good"? It certainly deserves
> mention. 

I'm showing my age - I met Linda when she was REALLY young,
back in Stone Poneys days; to me this is mid-period! To my
ears, next to Betty Everett (I don't know the Dee Dee
Warwick version), Linda's pales on record; however, I saw
a remarkable live tour in the "Mad Love"-LP period (late
70's) with a cookin' and drivin' band, and she did "You're
No Good" and a bunch of her other "softer" rock covers
that absolutely bristled with energy above and beyond the
records' wildest dreams.

WOW! The Brute Force in England concert - please, anyone,
keep us apprised!!!!

Peter Lerner: your subject line is a great place to start
for your wedding: "Let's Dance" by Chris Montez (Monogram
in the US). Other ideas in a brainstorm:
Contours, "Do You Love Me" (Gordy)
Chartbusters, "She's The One" (Mutual)
Kenny Dino, "Your Ma Said You Cried In Your Sleep Last
Night" (Musicor)
Crystals, "He's Sure The Boy I Love" (Philles)
Gary US Bonds, "Quarter to Three" (Legrand)
Chubby Checker, "Let's Twist Again" (Parkway - more fun
than the 3-time #1 "Twist," and not as burned out)
Beatles, "Thank You Girl" (VeeJay - okay, Parlophone!)
Dave Clark Five, "Glad All Over" (Epic)
Marketts, "Surfers' Stomp" (Liberty)

How am I doing so far? Not a "smoocher" or "slow shuffle"
in sight. But for an evening closer, check out the
Corsairs' "I'll Take You Home" (Tuff), the perfect wedding
party wrap up, both sound and subject. In fact, Bette and
I played it at the end of our reception 8 years ago.

And a new band in the classic sound: Slow Slushy Boys, on
Wildebeest in the US http://wildebeest.com;
don't know in

Europe, but I think it's a French label (they're French).
They've got some stuff that'll rock your socks off.
Farfisa-organ driven 60's sounds but in 2002 fidelity!

And Peter, congratulations to you and Karen.

In a message dated 3/24/02, Jim Cassidy writes:

> singer/songwriter Cindy Bullens

Scott, thanks for the update; we used to play her first
couple of albums a fair amount at WHCN in Hartford back in
the freeform early '70's. I don't remember much about the
music except that it was good.

Mark Wirtz notes:

> Randy Newman became an undeniable influence on
> virtually all creative music makers, consciously, or
> unconsciously. In a way, he is sort of the Bob Dylan
> of modern popular music (with strong, nostalgic links
> to traditional, melancholic pop music).

...and after 16 nominations, he finally got an Oscar!
Granted, IMO there is much more music of Newman's more
deserving, but by now I'd give him an Oscar for setting
the phone book to music. I agree with Mark and amplify: he
is one of the seminal influences, albeit subsurface, on
'60's-and-after music. (Too bad Sir Paul was in direct
competition; I also think "Vanilla Sky" is prime Paul.)

Watching "Once And Again" last night, I was thinking about
how much the beautiful bittersweet story would have been
enhanced by a Randy Newman soundtrack - "Think It's Going
To Rain Today," "Marie," and other great truths of the
broken-hearted who remain eternally hopeful.

Speaking of TV, "The American Embassy" (new and OK, on Fox)
used a white-reggae-novelty song called "Smoke Two Joints"
on the soundtrack; I believe the record was originally
>from Hawaii in the '80's. I can't find a tape I have of it
to get the artist's name - and I also thought only I and
maybe a hundred other people around the world
knew/remembered it. (I think Dr. Demento played it a
couple of times in a less-PC era.) Any help, please?

And back squarely on topic, do any of our UK friends (or
anyone) know anything about Ellie Janov's cover of
"Portobello Road" (Capitol in the US, 1967), written by -
pardon the words - Cat Stevens? Nice harpsichord-driven
track. Did she do anything afterward?

And that's more news than is fit to print!
Country Paul


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 9
   Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2002 20:50:44 -0500
   From: Mark Frumento 
Subject: Re: Nilsson, Addrisi

> I don't mean to suggest anything definite here, but I
> just recently got the Addrisi Brothers' 1972 album We've
> Got To Get It On Again, and it sure does sound at times
> like Harry Nilsson--the vocal quality, the way melody
> takes a quirky turn.  Not the title track, but selections
> like "Windy Wakefield" and "Twogether."

Nilsson sings on that album. I agree though the songs have
a Nilssonish feel. Great stuff. One forgets how good those
guys were at song writing and singing too


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
End



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