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Spectropop - Digest Number 421




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                        Music Everywhere You Go
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There are 15 messages in this issue of Spectropop.

Topics in this Digest Number 421:

      1. Bryan Hyland, Mike Clifford, Grape, Rick Nelson
           From: "Paul Payton" 
      2. The Globetrotters/Hugo and Luigi
           From: "Don Charles" 
      3. Mark Wirtz/Tomorrow
           From: Will George 
      4. Re: Jimmie Rodgers
           From: Michael Edwards 
      5. "You're No Good" -  who did the original version?
           From: Michael Edwards 
      6. Hal Blaine Audio-biography
           From: Bobby Lloyd Hicks 
      7. Re:  The Matchmakers
           From: Michael Sinclair 
      8. grape and regional hits
           From: "Frank Carmack" 
      9. Nilsson, Newman...
           From: "Joseph Scott" 
     10. Globetrotters - Rainy Day Bells
           From: Richard Globman 
     11. Too alive Crewe
           From: "James F.  Cassidy" 
     12. The Complete Sessions of Hal Blaine
           From: "Mike Arcidiacono" 
     13. Re: Jimmie Rodgers
           From: "Norman" 
     14. "toy-town"
           From: "Michael Coleman"
     15. You're No Good
           From: "Ian Chapman" 


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Message: 1
   Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 13:44:26 -0500
   From: "Paul Payton" 
Subject: Bryan Hyland, Mike Clifford, Grape, Rick Nelson

Mark Wirtz writes:

> Bryan Hyland, for instance made some extraordinary
> records, with arranging and production work that was
> nothing less than brilliant and trend setting. It's
> tragic that with all the justified attention given to
> people like Phil Spector and Jack Nitzsche etc, nobody
> ever mentions greats like Don Costa (arr/prod for a l
> the early Paul Anka hits), Stan Applebaum (arr/prod
> for the classic Neil Sedaka hits), Quincy Jones (!!!)
> arr/prod for golden hits like "It's My Party," and
> Snuff Garrett (prod of the classic Bobby Vee hits), or
> Chet Atkins, the genius behind countless pop rock
> creations. They paved the way for so many of us, AND
> THEY DIDN'T HAVE ANYBODY TO COPY FROM!!!

Yes - new threads! And add to the above list Hugo & Luigi;
see my post in Digest 420. If someone can play Brian
Hyland's "Come Away Little Girl" on Dot to musica, you'll
underscore Mark's comments and hear what the Stones might
have done if they'd kept going in the "2000 Light Years"
direction. Even such quiet gems as "Ginny Come Lately"
remain exquisite.

Similar teen-oriented material of unusual "adult" quality:
Mike Clifford, who did "Close to Cathy" (the big hit),
"One By One The Roses Died" and "Danny's Dream," was
essentially a voiceles wonder who sang beautiful, almost
romantic-era classical melodies to great arrangements by
Don Costa (I believe). All UA in the US.

Bob Rashkow wrote:

> IMHO there is no track quite like Moby Grape's BITTER
> WIND and, alas! probably never will be...a great 60s
> relic and folk-acid classic if I do say so myself!!! 
> Any takers?

Taken, indeed. The Grape had so many damn good tracks....

Frank Youngwerth writes:

> ... Bear Family has tackled Ricky Nelson 

They have? Can you tell me whether there's a version of
the Beatles' "From Me To You" there? I vaguely remember
hearing yet a different version from the Beatles and Del
Shannon, and thinking I heard it identified as Rick Nelson,
but I never could find out if he did or didn't cover it.

Country Paul


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 2
   Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 19:05:37 +0000
   From: "Don Charles" 
Subject: The Globetrotters/Hugo and Luigi

Songs are written by (the producer) Jeff Barry;
Sedaka/Greenfield; and R. Clark/J.R. Bailey/K. Williams. 
It's a wonderful, unique album, whoever's singing on it,
and way more interesting than most of the Archies material
I've heard. "Rainy Day Bells" is simply awesome neo-doowop,
and even shows up on a beach music compilation from 10-15
years ago.

"R. Clark" is Rudy Clark of "Good Lovin'" fame.  "Rainy Day
Bells" was a big "beach music" hit, I'm told, and Connie
Francis covered it in the '80s.  Yes, The Globetrotters
album is indeed a forgotten treasure . . . soul music for
children, sung by some of the greatest singers of the
doo-wop era, if the information Bobby Jay gave me was
correct.  I believe I hear Billy Guy doing the lead on
"Lillian Peabody" and "Sneaky Pete," and Johnny Moore
handling the comic turn on "Marathon Mary."  As for Archies
vs. Globetrotters, I don't think it's at all fair to
compare the two.  Jeff Barry may have produced both studio
groups, but The Archies were clearly more to the pop/rock
side, while The Globetrotters were R & B-oriented.  Ron
Dante isn't an R & B singer, but he was definitely one of
the greatest '60s pop vocalists.  Anything he sings is AT
LEAST worth hearing, and his Archies tracks rank among his
finest work.  Whether you like Archies or Globetrotters
records better depends on your personal tastes.  Personally,
I like 'em both!

A word about Hugo and Luigi productions:  You haven't
really lived until you've heard the incredibly fun sides
they cut with Jeff Barry in 1960:  "Teen Quartet," "All You
Need Is A Quarter"(from the Broadway musical DO-RE-MI),
"Lonely Lips" and the immortal "Face From Outer Space!"

Don Charles


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 3
   Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 14:27:07 EST
   From: Will George 
Subject: Mark Wirtz/Tomorrow

Mark writes:

>(aside from my work with Tomorrow),

Is that the same band that Olivia Newton-John was a member
of?

Bill


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 4
   Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 16:57:14 -0500
   From: Michael Edwards 
Subject: Re: Jimmie Rodgers

Great write-up on Jimmie Rodgers from Paul Payton. Jimmie
is another one of our greats whose career is limited to 2
songs by US oldies radio - and that's if he's lucky. From
his Dot days, members should check out Jimmie's The World
I Used To Know from 1964 - a song written by the poet, Rod
McKuen. Don't be put off, the result is not poetry, just
darned good pop music

Mike Edwards

----- Original Message from "Paul Payton"

> I think Rodgers' ouevre from that time period has many
> overlooked gems. Yes, he was pop-folk, but he had that
> wonderful voice, arrangements sympathetic to it, and a
> signature style that held fast until an unfortunate
> serious accident sidelined him in the mid 60's. Check out
> "Wonderful You" (with a wonderful full Hugo & Luigi chorus)
> and the absolutely naive and non-cynical "Better Loved
> You'll Never Be" (totally unhip but exquisite); and then
> later, on Dot, "It's Over," his most successful move into
> "relevant" folk-pop.


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 5
   Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 22:51:53 -0000
   From: Michael Edwards 
Subject: "You're No Good" -  who did the original version?

Does anyone know who first recorded "You're No Good"? It
seems to be commonly assumed that Betty Everett did. After
all, she did take the song to #51 in the Billboard Hot 100,
debuting on the chart in November 1963. Alan Warner in his
book, Who Sang What In Rock N Roll (Blandford, UK, 1990)
states that the song was "originally an R&B hit for Betty
Everett." He lists other recordings but not one by Dee Dee
Warwick (Jubilee 5459). I'm not sure when Dee Dee's
version came out, but the catalog number is close to that
of Betty Harris' Cry To Me (Jubilee 5456). Cry To Me
entered the Hot 100 in September 1963. Does that make Dee
Dee's version of You're No Good the earlier one? Dee Dee
made a career of lining up great material for other
artists. She did the original versions of Suspicious Minds
(later by Elvis) and I'm Gonna Make You Love Me (later by
The Supremes & Temps). Hopefully, sister Dionne is helping
her out as Dee Dee missed out on those big royalty checks.

Having said all this, neither Dee Dee's nor Betty's is the
definitive version of this great song from the pen of
Clint Ballard. That honor goes to a group from Liverpool
who once utilized the Beatles as their backing band, the
Swinging Blue Jeans. Ray Ennis and the lads strip the song
back to its basics, throw in some understated Scouse back
up vocals and take over ownership.

But I still would like to know who did it first.

Thanks, 
Mike Edwards


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Message: 6
   Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 18:42:26 EST
   From: Bobby Lloyd Hicks 
Subject: Hal Blaine Audio-biography

Frank Youngwerth opined:

> Now that Bear Family has tackled Ricky Nelson, I'd love
> to see 'em do Jan & Dean. Or even better, the complete
> sessions of Hal Blaine!! 

According to Hal's daughter Michelle, who runs his
website (halblaine.com), in June they'll be offering a
4-CD audio-biography of Hal's recollections and
observations on his multi-decade career in the record
biz, available only from his website. 

Hal's Top 10 discography from 1956 thru 1981 is listed
in his book, Hal Blaine and the Wrecking Crew (his
website lists 1956 thru 1971), but Michelle says there
is talk of publishing Hal's Top 40 discography...which
would be a book in itself !

blh


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 7
   Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 17:54:47 -0800 (PST)
   From: Michael Sinclair 
Subject: Re:  The Matchmakers

--- Jeff Lemlich wrote:

> This got a U.S. release!  I have it right here in
> front of me:
> 
> Chapter One 45-2906  THE MATCHMAKERS - Wooly Wooly
> Watsgong/Tell Me A Secret

> 
Dear Jeff,

I had no idea. Thanks for the information. Isn't it odd
though that this got a US release, and 99% of my UK
productions never did?? LOL

Best,
Mark (Wirtz)


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 8
   Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 12:16:39 -0500
   From: "Frank Carmack" 
Subject: grape and regional hits

I remember first reading about the Grape in of all places
16 Magazine.

We used to get it for the cool Beatles coverage-not
realizing until too late that it was for the species of
FE-male that was looking increasingly GOOD to us 12 year
old guys.

Gloria was trying to pass those guys off as the next
teen-pop sensation- too bad No Depression music didn't
exit in '67.

The only song off the first LP that I remember hearing on
WROV(Roanoke, Virginia) was "Sitting By My Window", but
that was enough to convince me that I needed that album.
By the time I listened to it twice, I was a believer; in
the music, not the myth.

(A year later, I bought the Kaleidoscope, BEACON FROM MARS
based on a 30 second ad I heard from WLS in Chicago, late
at night, when they beefed up their transmission signal.I
think you could have picked up that signal in Puerto Rico.
Again, non-commercial music that was advertised
commercially, and impressed a music addicted teen from
Virginia enough to plunk down his yard mowing dollars for
a fix of the magic elixir.)

Ain't it great, 

Freeman Carmack


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 9
   Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 08:58:47 -0700
   From: "Joseph Scott" 
Subject: Nilsson, Newman...

Derek Taylor turned John Lennon and Paul McCartney on to
Nilsson's music in late 1967, and they both immediately
became very big fans of his. So there's probably some
Nilsson influence on some of the White Album and Abbey
Road songs.

Along the same lines, how about Randy Newman's influence
on others such as the Beatles? I've read a Feb. '67
McCartney interview in which he raves about the song
"Simon Smith And His Amazing Dancing Bear."

As Mark W. probably knows, McCartney has also
acknowledged the Teenage Opera as an influence on his
late '60s work.

Joseph Scott


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 10
   Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 08:30:24 -0800
   From: Richard Globman 
Subject: Globetrotters - Rainy Day Bells

Frank SED:

>It's a wonderful, unique album, whoever's singing on it,
>and way more interesting than most of the Archies material
>I've heard. "Rainy Day Bells" is simply awesome neo-doowop,
>and even shows up on a beach music compilation from 10-15
>years ago.

Agreed..."Rainy Day Bells" is one of the greatest doo-wops
ever.  Actually, I've never heard the other album
cuts...maybe I'll see if Audio Galaxy has anything lying
around.

Have no idea if this is true or not, but I was told that
Meadowlark Lemon himself sang lead on "RDB"...wouldn't that
be a hoot if it was true!

DICKYG


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Message: 11
   Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 10:00:04 -0500
   From: "James F.  Cassidy" 
Subject: Too alive Crewe

The Artist Formerly Known as Mark Wirtz wondered about the
whereabouts of Dan Crewe.  He manages producer/engineer/
mastermeister Bob Clearmountain and divides his time
between Nashville and Maine with his wife, singer/
songwriter Cindy Bullens.  His email and business phone
number can be found on: 
http://www.bobclearmountain.com.

Jim Cassidy


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Message: 12
   Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2002 10:28:15 -0500
   From: "Mike Arcidiacono" 
Subject: The Complete Sessions of Hal Blaine

----- Original Message from: "Frank Youngwerth" 

> Now that Bear Family has tackled Ricky Nelson, I'd love to
> see 'em do Jan & Dean. Or even better, the complete
> sessions of Hal Blaine!!

Well, Frank, if Bear DID "The Complete Sessions" of Hal 
Blaine", it would be 8,000 songs!!!

mike


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 13
   Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2002 19:16:15 +1030
   From: "Norman" 
Subject: Re: Jimmie Rodgers

Hi,

Re: Paul Payton and Mike Edwards mentioning the talented
Jimmie Rodgers.

I would certainly say that it was Jimmie Rodgers who turned
me on to Rod McKuen with the hit The World I Used To Know
in 1964.

I hope I am not confusing the singers here but I believe
Jimmie Rodgers is the son of  Hank Snow and was named in
honour of Jimmie Rodgers (America's Blue Yodeller, The
Singing Brakeman etc.,)

Some early printed material I have refers to Jimmie as
Jimmy.  Was this the same elsewhere or just a typical
ethnocentric Australian Anglicisation of an unfamiliar word.

Honeycomb and Kisses Sweeter Than Wine were played
frequently enough when I was a kid but I can't find them
listed on the local chart. I think they both charted in
Australia as well as "English Country Garden".

Surprisingly enough the following list did chart in
Adelaide from 1958 to 1967.

Secretly #7    1958
Are You Really Mine #36    1958
Bimbombey #1    1959
Waltzing Matilda  1959  ????
I'm Never Going To Tell On You 1959
Just A Closer Walk With Thee 1960
Wreck of the John "B"    1960
The World I Used To Know  #6    1964
Child of Clay  #12    1967

I saw Jimmy Rodgers interviewed on Australian  TV several
years ago.  It was very interesting and frank, especially
about the "mugging incident".


Cheers
Norman


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Message: 14
   Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2002 02:48:15 -0700
   From: "Michael Coleman" 
Subject: "toy-town"

Please elaborate on this "toy-town" sub genre.  

Thanks,

Michael Coleman


----- Original Message from "Mark Frumento" 

> My interest in Mark's music and others of his day stems
> from my love of British pop/psych... more specifically the
> sub-genre called "toy town". Is it possible that this and
> other ultra catchy pop stemmed from Harry Nilsson? Can
> anyone piece it together?


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------


Message: 15
   Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2002 01:12:21 -0000
   From: "Ian Chapman"
Subject: You're No Good

Mike Edwards wrote: 

> Does anyone know who first recorded "You're No Good"? It
> seems to be commonly assumed that Betty Everett
> did...I'm not sure when Dee Dee's version came out, but
> the catalog number is close to that of Betty Harris' Cry
> To Me (Jubilee 5456)... Does that make Dee Dee's version
> of You're No Good the earlier one? Dee Dee made a career
> of lining up great material for other artists. She did
> the original versions of Suspicious Minds (later by
> Elvis) and I'm Gonna Make You Love Me (later by The
> Supremes & Temps).... Having said all this...the
> definitive version of this great song [is by] the
> Swinging Blue Jeans. Ray Ennis and the lads strip the
> song back to its basics, throw in some understated
> Scouse back up vocals and take over ownership.
> >
> But I still would like to know who did it first.


Mike,

It was Dee Dee Warwick who cut the original version of
"You're No Good", and indeed "I'm Gonna Make You Love Me".
Not "Suspicious Minds", however - Elvis had a hit in '69,
Dee Dee's version appeared in '71.  Regarding the
Swinging Blue Jeans version of  "You're No Good" - no way
can I agree with that appraisal.  It's fine as a piece of
British Beat, but can't compare to the sublime treatment
the song gets from both Dee Dee and Betty Everett.
Personally, the Betty Everett version is the one for me -
the measured, ice-cool, put-down delivery, that little
catch of breath after the second line....... if ever a
record defined closure, this is it.

Ian


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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