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Spectropop - Digest Number 392




              http://www.spectropop.com/go2/teardrops.html
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There are 14 messages in this issue of Spectropop.

Topics in this Digest Number 392:

      1. Greatest Hits, Varied Seasons and Misty Sentimental Angels
           From: "Paul Payton" 
      2. john simon: you are what you eat
           From: "harvey williams" 
      3. Re: Flash Cadillac
           From: Mark Frumento 
      4. Bob Gaudio
           From: David Gordon 
      5. Re: bubblegum debate
           From: "Don Charles" 
      6. Re: Greatest Hits, Varied Seasons and Misty Sentimental Angels
           From: "Robert Conway" 
      7. Re: VALLI, GAUDIO & CREWE
           From: Mark Frumento 
      8. Re: john simon: you are what you eat
           From: Paul Richards 
      9. Re: Greatest Hits, Varied Seasons and Misty Sentimental Angels
           From: "Mike Arcidiacono" 
     10. The Greta Garbo Home For Wayward Boys and Girls
           From: "Javed Jafri" 
     11. re: Teardrops, Flash Cadillac
           From: "Jack Madani" 
     12. Any Tokens Fans?
           From: "DJ Steve" 
     13. Re: Greatest Hits, Varied Seasons and Misty Sentimental Angels
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
     14. Re:
           From: James Botticelli 


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Message: 1
   Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2002 03:13:00 -0500
   From: "Paul Payton" 
Subject: Greatest Hits, Varied Seasons and Misty Sentimental Angels

Bob Conway wrote:

> And isn't that the way it often goes with long-awaited
> best-of type collections?...with record execs often
> doing the dealing it seems like consumers usually end
> up a card or two short of a full deck.  A pet peeve of
> mine and perhaps the subject of discussion at a later
> date.

It happens a fair amount, creating "the mystery of the
phantom oldie." For example, Dion & the Belmonts' "Don't
Pity Me," a major hit, never made it to the first
Greatest Hits collection, and has been sort of "lost."
It's also my favorite D&B record. Same with Simon &
Garfunkel's "The Dangling Conversation."

Ken Levine mentions Noreen Corcoran - she had the fine
"Love Kitten" on VeeJay - a total girl-group sound! (Do I
remember correctly that Bob Crewe was behind that one, or
has time hazed things over?)

Alan Zwieg wrote:
> Now, will someone tell me where the sexual innuendo 
> is in "Chewy Chewy"?

"Something good to eat..." works for me.

Javed wrote:
> The Four Seasons did record one "serious" 60's type
> album called "Genuine Imitation Life Gazette" and they
> even tried to look a bit hipper on the cover of that
> one.

...which, IMO and the opinions of many others I knew,
represented some of their lesser and most "strapped on"
output. (And the hair was long, but not hip; you could
tell. Really.) Progressive rock stations avoided it in
droves - we could smell a shuck when we saw one - but
when they came back with "Who Loves You," modern but
true to themselves and their roots, we proudly played
that. (As the BBoys said, "Be true to your school.")

Mike Rashkow wrote:
> Thanks, Lindsay for reminding me about Misty ...it swings.

For another incredibly swingin' "Misty" check out Lloyd
Price on Double L, 1962-63. And of course Errol Garner's
jazz-piano original was uptempo, too.

Mike again:
> ...next I'll be talking about Tommy Dorsey.

Last summer I found an ancient 2 x 45rpm RCA EP with
original recordings of big band theme songs for a buck at
a tag sale. TD's "Getting Sentimental Over You" (which is
on it) is a masterpiece. Still. Good taste is timeless.
(Segue into it from "'Til" by The Angels [Caprice, 1960]
with the gorgeous French horn bridge.)

Now, back to our regularly-scheduled discussion.

Country Paul


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Message: 2
   Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2002 10:58:18 -0000
   From: "harvey williams" 
Subject: john simon: you are what you eat

Apologies if this has already been answered, I have a
big email backlog..... A long time ago Paul Payton
asked: 

> Re: the Rock Machine, "My Name is Jack - John Simon" is
> wonderful! Does anyone remember a song he did called "The
> Wabe" (as in , "Twas brilling and the slithy toves gyred
> and gimbled in the wabe")? What album was that on? Is it
> available? Weren't both those tracks from a movie? I
> forget the name....

"My Name Is Jack" is indeed a smashing record, bettered
only by "The Wabe". As far as I'm aware, both numbers can
only be found on the soundtrack LP for the movie "You Are
What You Eat", although there was a promo 45 of both
songs released too. Has anyone seen the film? I've not,
but the "plot" synopsis (I use the term loosely) in the
liner notes makes it sound like a real..er..trip. Did
John Simon release any other solo records around this
time?

HarveyW


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Message: 3
   Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2002 17:09:02 -0000
   From: Mark Frumento 
Subject: Re: Flash Cadillac

Kingsley - I just bought your Pet Sounds book yesterday
(I'm sure this is old news to most people on this list)
and am reading now. It's great! 

Hi all - I'm new to the list but I have been checking the
Web site out for a while now. I'm into it all... no need
to even elaborate.


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Message: 4
   Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2002 17:20:39 +0000 (GMT)
   From: David Gordon 
Subject: Bob Gaudio

Something I don't think I've ever seen mentioned is
that the intro. to "Touch Me" by the Doors is a
straight steal from "C'mon Marianne"

Re "Little Shop of Horrors" - Levi Stubbs as the voice
of Audrey is the best thing about the movie I'd
- is there much of him on the soundtrack album / CD ?


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Message: 5
   Date: Wed, 20 Feb 2002 20:08:43 +0000
   From: "Don Charles" 
Subject: Re: bubblegum debate

> Now, will someone tell me where the sexual innuendo 
> is in "Chewy Chewy"?

Look no further than the title.  Think Monica Lewinsky 
and Bill Clinton ...

Don Charles


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Message: 6
   Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2002 20:11:04 -0600
   From: "Robert Conway" 
Subject: Re: Greatest Hits, Varied Seasons and Misty Sentimental Angels

To Paul Payton:

I originally wrote: 

> > And isn't that the way it often goes with long-awaited
> > best-of type collections?...with record execs often doing
> > the dealing it seems like consumers usually end up a card
> > or two short of a full deck.  A pet peeve of mine and
> > perhaps the subject of discussion at a later date.)
>
Paul Payton's comment:  

> It happens a fair amount, creating "the mystery of the
> phantom oldie." For example, Dion & the Belmonts'
> "Don't Pity Me," a major hit, never made it to the
> first Greatest Hits collection, and has been sort of
> "lost." It's also my favorite D&B record. Same with
> Simon & Garfunkel's "The Dangling Conversation."

Paul,

Record execs who select tracks for best-of compilations
frequently make errors of omission.  Obviously it is all
about sucking in another consumer/fan to make money...a
good recent example (a phenomenom really) is the "best of"
package with extra (new songs).  I know the thinking is
extreme fans who own a best of CD will buy the new set for
two new tunes.  Hey, if these new songs are so worthwhile
then put them on a complete new CD of new songs.  Also, I
once joked to a friend who asked what new CDs I had
acquired that I couldn't afford any new CDs--I was too
busy rebuying/upgrading my Marvin Gaye collection...must
have rebought his Super Hits, Greatest Hits, I believe
three box sets (the first one was pathetic), and finally
wound up with "The Master--1961-1984).  Lastly, the
reported final word on best-of CDs by both the Turtles and
Association was issued on Tuesday.  Both anthologies are
two-CD sets with fifty tracks.  I intend to buy both even
though I have the Association's Japanese CDs including the
expanded single-disc greatest hits.  The Association had
fewer than 15 singles so I thought it would be a
no-brainer in terms of making sure each and every single
was included.  Not so..."No Fair at All," a great
harmony-laden ballad, is not included.  Comments on
rationale anyone?   

Bob Conway


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Message: 7
   Date: Fri, 22 Feb 2002 02:27:41 -0000
   From: Mark Frumento 
Subject: Re: VALLI, GAUDIO & CREWE

--- In spectropop, "Guy Thomas" wrote:

> Doesn't it seem that Frankie Valli, Bob Gaudio and Bob
> Crewe have never really let the world in on their lives
> and/or the processes behind their music...The trio created 
> an incredible amount of great records... Even after
> the British Invasion took off, they were able to hold
> their own well into 1967... What were the dynamics of
> the Valli&Gaudio relationship... How did they feel
> about not being recognized as was Brian Wilson & his
> BBs? The collaboration/partnership/interaction between
> the two chief Seasons and 'outsider' Crewe continues
> hold great interest for me. 

As a newbie on the list I'm sure I'll make my share of
obvious and stupid statements (I've already done the
latter by assaulting Kingsley) but your subject is one
near and dear to my heart. Though I'm sure you are
looking for more expert input to your question here are
my thoughts for what they are worth:

It seems to me that because FV&TFS were caught between
the harmony group (i.e. Doo-Wop) scene and the rock and
roll scene they fell throught the cracks. By the time the
rock/pop guys came around teen magazines were picking up
on the younger set. As you say FV&TFS were the older,
experienced guys by then and probably not as interesting.

I think this has all lead to real identity crisis for
that group. It's a shame and you bring a lot of great
questions. I think Crewe and Gaudio are sometimes seen as
imitators but that is just not fair, in fact Brian
Wilson is known to have adored the FS.

By the late 60s it does seem that British acts were
hipper to the quality of the writing and I have some
great covers of FS tunes. One especially great cover is
"Begger's Parade" by the Falling Leaves.

Anyway it would be good to hear your questions answered.
As it has been left it seems like it was a just a big
production machine but I don't think that was really the
case.


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Message: 8
   Date: Fri, 22 Feb 2002 01:15:31 -0000
   From: Paul Richards 
Subject: Re: john simon: you are what you eat

--- In Spectropop, "harvey williams" wrote:

> Paul Payton asked: 
> 
> > Re: the Rock Machine, "My Name is Jack - John Simon" is
> > wonderful! Does anyone remember a song he did called "The
> > Wabe" (as in , "Twas brilling and the slithy toves gyred
> > and gimbled in the wabe")? What album was that on? Is it
> > available? Weren't both those tracks from a movie? I
> > forget the name....
> 
> "My Name Is Jack" is indeed a smashing record, bettered
> only by "The Wabe". As far as I'm aware, both numbers
> can only be found on the soundtrack LP for the movie
> "You Are What You Eat", although there was a promo 45
> of both songs released too. Has anyone seen the film?
> I've not, but the "plot" synopsis (I use the term
> loosely) in the liner notes makes it sound like a
> real..er..trip. Did John Simon release any other solo
> records around this time?

Don't know the record or the movie, Harvey, they sound
pretty cool, has anyone heard 'Jabberwock' by 'Boeing
Duveen & the Beautiful soup' which is also based on the
poem? Amazing record produced by the god-like Mark
Wirtz. Was'Excerpt from a Teenage Opera' a US hit?


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Message: 9
   Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2002 19:38:28 -0500
   From: "Mike Arcidiacono" 
Subject: Re: Greatest Hits, Varied Seasons and Misty Sentimental Angels

Bob Conway wrote:
>
> And isn't that the way it often goes with long-awaited
> best-of type collections?...with record execs often
> doing the dealing it seems like consumers usually end
> up a card or two short of a full deck


Remember Jay and The Americans Greatest Hits? It didnt
have 'She Cried", not only their FIRST hit but a biggie.

Same thing!!


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Message: 10
   Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2002 20:17:59 -0500
   From: "Javed Jafri" 
Subject: The Greta Garbo Home For Wayward Boys and Girls

> "My Name Is Jack" is indeed a smashing record,
> bettered only by "The Wabe". As far as I'm aware,
> both numbers can only be found on the soundtrack LP
> for the movie "You Are What You Eat", although there
> was a promo 45 of both songs released too. Has
> anyone seen the film? I've not, but the "plot"
> synopsis (I use the term loosely) in the liner notes
> makes it sound like a real..er..trip. Did John Simon
> release any other solo records around this time?

I have always loved Manfred Mann's version of this song
and thought it was a very worthy follow up to The Mighty
Quinn. The song actually made the top 10 here in Toronto
and I'm still the proud owner of the original 45 although
some might dismiss it as dare I say bubblegum.

Javed


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Message: 11
   Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2002 16:34:45 -0500
   From: "Jack Madani" 
Subject: re: Teardrops, Flash Cadillac

>I've been told  that  a Teardrops cd  has been released
>but I can find nothing.  Obviously  I have left some
>stones unturned although I thought I had left no stone
>unturned. Anyone ?

I found a link offa one of the girlgroup websites (I
apologize for not citing the particular websites, but I
believe it's from the Spectropop page), and I emailed the
fella who was offering the Teardrops cd, but after
several months I haven't heard from the fella yet. Their
stomping slice of compressed-drum bliss "You Won't Be
There" is on one of the "Girls Will Be Girls" anthologies,
IIRC.
>
>Javed's mention of Flash and the Kids reminded me how
>splendid their "Sons Of The Beaches" Surf/harmony
>pastiche album was.  Hidden away on that is one of my
>all time faves - "Time Will Tell" - that i first heard
>being played in the wonderful Rock On shop in London's
>Camden Town (where the Ace Records empire grew).  "Time
>Will Tell" is the most gorgeous slab of full on harmony
>pop,

And how.  Play it back to back with its source inspiration,
The Beach Boys' "I Can Hear Music," and you'll find it's
in the same key, and close to the same tempo.

I first owned Sons Of The Beaches on an 8-track tape.  The
tape jumped from channel 1 to channel 2 right in the
middle of "Only Time Will Tell"--the engineer faded slowly
down during the a cappella break, and then faded slowly
back up after the jump to channel 2.  Duh.

jack


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Message: 12
   Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2002 18:37:22 -0500
   From: "DJ Steve" 
Subject: Any Tokens Fans?

Out there? I bet you are from Brooklyn. I really love
their 1st album with The Lion Sleeps Tonight and all 
those good doo-wopy folky songs like Sloop John B. Is it
on CD yet? How about Neil Sedaka from the Brill Building?
Gotta love his early writing. Anyone read his auto- bio?
Does he mention the Tokens?

Dj Steve


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Message: 13
   Date: Fri, 22 Feb 2002 07:56:01 -0000
   From: Billy G. Spradlin 
Subject: Re: Greatest Hits, Varied Seasons and Misty Sentimental Angels

> Javed wrote:
> > The Four Seasons did record one "serious" 60's type
> > album called "Genuine Imitation Life Gazette" and they
> > even tried to look a bit hipper on the cover of that
> > one.

I thought it was strange on Rhino's re-issue back in
the early 90's used a different photograph on the cover,
removing the staged protest rally photos. If you get a
chance to see the original gatefold cover its a hoot. 
I think its a terrific album - most of the songs are
excellent and ambitious (except for the title track
which is as silly as anything the Moody Blues did),
though the production sounds a bit thin in places. I
noticed by 1968 the Seasons productions were getting
way too into adult-MOR ballads, less true Pop. 

The last truly great thing the Seasons did IMO was a
1967 B-side (of "Watch The Flowers Grow") called "Raven"
which is the last thing they did in the old
"stomp-clap-stomp" formula and is as fine as any of the
A-sides they were releasing at the time. 

> ...which, IMO and the opinions of many others I knew,
> represented some of their lesser and most "strapped on"
> output. (And the hair was long, but not hip; you could
> tell. Really.) Progressive rock stations avoided it in
> droves - we could smell a shuck when we saw one - but
> when they came back with "Who Loves You," modern but
> true to themselves and their roots, we proudly played
> that. (As the BBoys said, "Be true to your school.")

I think the 1972 Mowest album (which I dont have - has
it ever been released on CD) should have gotten them
back on the airwaves had Motown promoted the excellent
"The Night" instead of "Walk - Don't Look Back" (a nice
update of the groups 60's sound but not a great track)
in the USA as originaly planned.

And dont forget Frankie scoring big with "My Eyes Adored
You" in 1975, a really sappy song (I remember a friend
in Jr. High who loved the dammed thing) but it got him
back on the radio.

Billy


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Message: 14
   Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2002 20:48:11 EST
   From: James Botticelli 
Subject: Re:

> > The Four Seasons did record one "serious" 60's type
> > album called "Genuine Imitation Life Gazette" and they
> > even tried to look a bit hipper on the cover of that
> > one.
> 
> ...which, IMO and the opinions of many others I knew,
> represented some of their lesser and most "strapped on"
> output. (And the hair was long, but not hip; you could
> tell. Really.)

Fellow lister and indie filmmaker Alan Zweig has a
fairly well-developed theory on hair and its musical
meaning...Perhaps he could expound for us again. It
makes sense when you hear it . Also Alan maybe could
mention his film "Vinyl" that I've been lucky enough to
see.. Go on Alan wichyerbadself..JB

[ ADMIN NOTE: Thanks to JB for the enthusiastic
recommendation! Those members interested in reviewing the
recent "length of hair" thread are invited to read it at
the archives beginning here:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/message/3103
]



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