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Spectropop - Digest Number 389




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                           Total Sound Stereo
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There are 25 messages in this issue of Spectropop.

Topics in this Digest Number 389:

      1. Re: Superior covers
           From: Billy G. Spradlin
      2. Re: Grapevine
           From: Billy G. Spradlin
      3. Isley's instrumental backing track
           From: "David Feldman"
      4. Re: Bubblegum
           From: "Don Charles"
      5. Re: Spector ........ Jack
           From: "Peter Lerner"
      6. Nino Tempo & April Stevens
           From: Dan Hughes
      7. Is that "Runaway" traveling faster than she should?
           From: Thomas Taber
      8. Jody Miller
           From: "Jeff Lemlich"
      9. Re: More on that dreaded bullet-riddled La-La
           From: "Don Charles"
     10. Re: Jeff and Ellie, Country Style!
           From: "Don Charles"
     11. La La Di Da
           From: LePageWeb
     12. bits & pieces
           From: "Paul Payton"
     13. April, Ellie and Gayle
           From: "Don Charles"
     14. Re: Ray Stevens
           From: Dan Hughes
     15. Re: Ray Stevens / Novelty
           From: "robert campbell"
     16. Re: The Four Seasons' Name, the books are wrong.
           From: "robert campbell"
     17. Re: Bubblegum
           From: "robert campbell"
     18. Re: Superior covers
           From: "Cheryl Jennings"
     19. Re: Superior covers
           From: "Javed Jafri"
     20. Re: Spector ........ Jack
           From: "Javed Jafri"
     21. Re: Bubblegum
           From: "Javed Jafri"
     22. Re: April, Ellie and Gayle
           From: "Norman"
     23. George Freeman
           From: Simon White
     24. Ray Stevens: "Misty", boppin' down the sidewalk
           From: "Lindsay Martin"
     25. 101 Strings
           From: Michael Rashkow


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Message: 1
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 21:49:14 -0000
   From: Billy G. Spradlin
Subject: Re: Superior covers

The story goes that Gene played "You Showed Me" to the
Turtles on a old pump organ in the recording studio where
he was forced to play the song very slowly. The Turtles
based their version around his impromptu arrangement.
Great Song! I like the mono single mix where the guitar
lick in the chorus really jumps out - its mixed back on
the stereo mix.

Billy

> Then there are the hit cover versions of songs that were
> never hits in the first place.  My favorite in this
> category is "You Showed Me." The original by the Byrds
> (okay, "the Beefeaters") was a sloppy, Beatle-esque
> diamond-in-the-rough.  It wasn't even considered good
> enough to be included on the first Byrds album.  The
> Turtles transformed this Gene Clark/Roger (Jim) McGuinn
> tune into something sublime.
>
> Jim Cassidy


--------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------


Message: 2
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 21:42:33 -0000
   From: Billy G. Spradlin
Subject: Re: Grapevine

> Anyone close enough to Ronald Isley  to ask him?  If
> there is someone, can they also ask him why he doesn't
> seem to want to talk about his Motown recordings....

>From what (little) I have read about the Isleys, they
were treated as second-class outsiders (not being from
Detroit) and didn't like the label's "production line"
treatment. The group signed to Motown to keep thier
career going, but they didnt always get the best songs
and production teams.

Billy


--------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------


Message: 3
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 09:56:07 -0500
   From: "David Feldman"
Subject: Isley's instrumental backing track

John Lester writes:

> No......it was originally assigned to the Isley
> Brothers.......no vocals exist now though it is not clear
> whether Ronald cut it.......next was Smokey and his vocal
> appeared on the wonderful Motown Treasures
> CD..........then Marvin Gaye and then Gladys et al.
> Smokey later changed some lines on his first vocal and
> THAT version went on his Special Occasion album..
>

You imply that the instrumental track for the Isley's
version still exists.  Does it resemble the slower
groove of Marvin Gaye's version or the GK&P's?


--------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------


Message: 4
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 17:42:14 +0000
   From: "Don Charles"
Subject: Re: Bubblegum

Bob Conway writes:

>Today many people have shed their guilt of enjoying the
>pleasure derived from listening to the Lemon Pipers, Salt
>Water Taffy, Vanity Fair, etc. Recently Buddah Records
>(BMG) has released the best of Ohio Express, Lemon Pipers,
>and 1910 Fruitgum Company. Varese Sarabande also has
>issued a number of "Bubblegum Classics" with 20 or more
>tracks that do indeed include the classics but also stir
>the debate as to what truly deserves to be labeled
>Bubblegum.

It certainly IS debatable.  Just as debatable is the
question of who the market for that kind of music really
was.  In my opinion, most of the releases from the
Kasenetz-Katz stable were marketed at adults, given the
preponderance of sexual doubles entendres in songs like
"Yummy, Yummy, Yummy," "Chewy Chewy," "Mercy" and "Come On
Down, Mary Ann."  Jeff Barry will tell you that his
Archies' records were meant for preteens, but a quick
inspection of his lyrics reveals that he was really
writing to the same teenage market he'd been addressing
since the early '60s.  The adolescent girls who bought
"Sugar, Sugar" and "Jingle Jangle" in 1969 were no doubt
the younger sisters of girls who had purchased "Iko Iko"
and "Leader Of The Pack" in 1965.  The market was still
there in the late '60s, but increasingly pretentious
mainstream rock acts were ignoring it.  Suddenly, it
became terribly uncool to appeal primarily to teenage
girls (which necessarily raises a question about sexist
tendencies in music marketing).  "Bubblegum," for lack of
a better term, filled the void, but it quickly acquired
dirty word status in the rock media.  The strong bias
against "bubblegum" acts persists today.  Why else do you
think Britney Spears is trying so desperately to convince
people that she's "not that innocent?"  Despite her
obvious appeal to teenagers, she doesn't want to
acknowledge that demographic too openly.  I expect to
Britney to announce a forthcoming Playboy centerfold any
day now . . .

Don Charles


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Message: 5
   Date: Sat, 16 Feb 2002 21:06:27 -0000
   From: "Peter Lerner"
Subject: Re: Spector ........ Jack

Thanks to all who responded with memories of Jack Spector
- sounds like a true good guy.

Den asked
>
> I didn't realize Jack Spector did any music programming
> for Radio Caroline. If anyone has more info on this, I'd
> like to hear more about it. I'd love to know what songs
> he included on this programming.
>
Well, the ones I remember include items like Run Mascara
by the Exciters; Down in the Boondocks by Billy Joe
Royal; Evening time by Elena; and something called That
Boy of Mine by Lori Burton, which I can't remember (have
I imagined it?); and Hang on Sloopy by the McCoys, and
something by The Sheep - just great US sounds, the
counterbalance to all those British beat groups.......

Peter


--------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------


Message: 6
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 08:06:27 -0600
   From: Dan Hughes
Subject: Nino Tempo & April Stevens

My contribution to the Nino & April discussion:  two
flip sides.

I've Been Carrying A Torch For You So Long That I Burned
A Great Big Hole In My Heart is the flip of their
biggest hit, Deep Purple.

And One Forty-Five (or 1-45) is the back of Stardust.
This song was bizarre in that it made use of several
different meanings of the title: The time was 1:45 when
a desperate man with one .45 (as in gun) shot another
man in a robbery and escaped with $1.45.  "One-forty
five, one-forty five, all he had was a dollar forty-five."

Anybody remember either of those?

---Dan

P.S.  Nice Nino and April web site at (where else?)
http://www.ninoandapril.com/


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Message: 7
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 09:48:47 -0800 (PST)
   From: Thomas Taber
Subject: Is that "Runaway" traveling faster than she should?

Many of us love Del Shannon - does anyone know for
sure (or conjecture) whether "Runaway" was speeded up
before its release? I've read that Fats Domino and
maybe Dion recordings were treated thus.  And, Del
fans, doesn't "Sister Isabelle" belong on any list of
records that shouldabeen hits?


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Message: 8
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 16:08:01 -0500
   From: "Jeff Lemlich"
Subject: Jody Miller

"Robert Beason" wrote:

> Anyone interested in hearing Spectropop songs done up
> country style should check out Jody Miller's Anthology
> CD, which includes C&W versions of "Be My Baby," "He's
> So Fine," "To Know Him Is To Love Him" and "Will You
> Love Me Tomorrow".  All these tracks were recorded in
> the early 70s.

Jody worked with some Spectropop favorites in the 60s,
including some sides produced by David Gates.  My favorite
is probably "I Knew You Well" (written and produced by
Gates) which features some beautiful harpsicord work.  The
flip (I'm Into Lookin' For Someone To Love Me) is a
Wine-Bayer song.  It was released on Capitol 2066.

Jody is alive and well, and happy to hear that she's still
appreciated by some of her old fans.

Jeff Lemlich
http://www.limestonerecords.com


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Message: 9
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 18:02:03 +0000
   From: "Don Charles"
Subject: Re: More on that dreaded bullet-riddled La-La

Please!!! No suggestions about shooting the La La!  Our
Miss Brooks is a national treasure . . . long may she
live.

Don Charles


>From: Thomas Taber:
>
> It went:
> Who shot the La-La? - I don't know;
> Who shot the La-La? - I don't know;
> Who shot the La-La? - I don't know
> he must be a (two syllable word) soul.


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Message: 10
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 18:05:21 +0000
   From: "Don Charles"
Subject: Re: Jeff and Ellie, Country Style!

>Anyone interested in hearing Spectropop songs done up
>country style should check out Jody Miller's Anthology
>CD, which includes C&W versions of "Be My Baby," "He's
>So Fine," "To Know Him Is To Love Him" and "Will You
>Love Me Tomorrow".  All these tracks were recorded in
>the early 70s.  Also included, of course, is the
>brilliant "Home Of The Brave", which pretty well sums up
>the entire previous decade in 2 minutes 50 seconds.
>
Sounds like a winner!  Ms. Miller was one of the first
celebrities to add her signature to my "Let's Send Jeff
Barry and Ellie Greenwich to Cleveland" petition.  Very
nice person.  Incidentally, she also cut an excellent
country version of "Lay A Little Lovin' On Me,"
originally cut by Robin McNamara for Jeff's Steed label.
To my ears, it has the edge.

Don Charles


--------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------


Message: 11
   Date: Tue, 19 Feb 2002 10:33:27 +0900
   From: LePageWeb
Subject: La La Di Da

Oliver Morgan had a record out in 1964 called "Who Shot
The Lala." It was coupled with "Hold Your Dog."

GNP Crescendo #318. (1964)


--------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------


Message: 12
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 14:38:41 -0500
   From: "Paul Payton"
Subject: bits & pieces

Andrew Simons: Guess I missed "Cholly Oop." (This could
go on like the "Annie" series from Hank Ballard and ff.!)

Tom Taber: can't help with the discography. Maybe I'll
transfer your "Who Shot The La-La" post to the Outsider
list; if someone there knows, I'll post the results here.

Rashkovsky writes:

> Ray Stevens ... a big talent. Writes, arranges, sings,
> plays and comes with unique perspective.... currently
> with Osama Your Mama.

Agree on the talent part, even if I don't always agree
with his political perspective. And what IS Osama Your
Mama?!?? I'm afraid to guess....

Re: "You Showed Me" - wasn't the Byrds' version more of a
demo? Does that count in the "covers" department, since
it never came out at the time, or as The Turtles taking a
potentially good song and making it great? BTW, I've
heard "the original" (on the new Sundazed box set) and it
is indeed lacking something, but is fascinating to hear
in the context of what became of it.

Re: "Bubblegum is the naked truth"? Nope. Nothing has a
monopoly on truth, or good music, etc. But there's great
stuff and crap in every genre, so point me to the former,
warn me of the latter (or let's laugh at it together),
and let the discussion rage on. I'm here for the duration.

Country Paul


--------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------


Message: 13
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 17:58:54 +0000
   From: "Don Charles"
Subject: April, Ellie and Gayle

I just acquired a copy of April Stevens' 1974 single
"Wake Up And Love Me" on A & M.  Every time I listen to
it, I have to clean my eyeglasses because she's doing
some big-time heavy breathing into the microphone!  This
was one of only two solo chart records she ever had in
the United States (the other being "Teach Me Tiger").
Jeff Barry and Nino Tempo writing and production credits,
natch.

I also recently acquired a copy of Ellie Greenwich's rare
second single for Bell, "(It's Like A)Sad Old Kinda Movie."
A member of the list supplied me with a promo copy (you
know who you are, and I'm eternally grateful).  The
topside is a pleasant Tony Macaulay tune, not too
memorable, really, but the flipside!!!  Honey, hush!
"That Certain Someone" is one of the best songs Miss
Ellie ever wrote with Mike Rashkow.  The lyrics sound
autobiographical, and her little girl vocal tears at your
heart.  It would've been an ideal choice to include in
her musical, "Leader Of The Pack."  It's a much stronger
tune than "Rock of Rages," and it gets that
standing-at-the-crossroads message across a lot more
subtly.

Thanks to another Spectropop subscriber (again, you know
who you are!) for sending me taped copies of Gayle
Haness's fantastic singles on Bang.  Every one is a Jeff
Barry composition and production, and every one kicks ASS!
Songs like "I've Never Gotten Over You, Baby," "Johnny
Ander" and "When Your Baby Says Good-Bye" make you
imagine what Mary Weiss and The Shangri-Las would've
sounded like had they continued to work with Jeff.

Don Charles


--------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------


Message: 14
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 08:24:30 -0600
   From: Dan Hughes
Subject: Re: Ray Stevens

Rashkovsky sez,

> I'm a Ray Stevens booster....

Back in the 70's I was program director at WKRP radio
(the real one, which was in Dallas, Georgia, about 30
miles east of Atlanta).  Our secretary's husband was
Ray's cousin.  He told me that Ray often attended the
annual Ragsdale summer reunion, but generally sat off by
himself and seldom spoke to anyone.

Weird.

---Dan


--------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------


Message: 15
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 11:41:32 -0800
   From: "robert campbell"
Subject: Re: Ray Stevens / Novelty

I just got my Perry VII decca record player out of the
closet and played "America Communicate With Me"  by Ray
Stevens.  It sent shivers through me, I have not played
that in close to 20 years.  Ray Stevens knew what he was
doing.  Good hook with the public and a great performer.

One of my favories I played is "Down and Out" by George
Freeman (Valiant #6039) arranged by Perry Botkin Jr.
Very spectorish, with castanets, thunderous drumroll and
strings.  The flip side called "The Quiver" sound like a
Philles B Side throwaway, with Hal Blaine style drumrolls.

I also just played "When I Get Scared"  by the Lovelites
on Phi-Dan. Great stuff huh?  Thanks for letting me be
part of your group.  You are all super.

Robertgippy

----- Original Message from: "Michael Rashkow"

> I'm a Ray Stevens booster. Think he is a biog talent.
> Writes, arranges, sings, plays and comes with unique
> perspective.  Sometimes a little over the top but
> Guitarzan is masterful, Mr. Business Man a major league
> piece, Unwind a killer record and he is still out there 30
> or more years later--currently with Osama Your Mama.

Guy wrote
>
> For all you novelty record nuts who came out of the
> woodwork after my "Juanita Banana" enquiry check out this
> site which I came across whilst doing a bit of Peels
> research for myself. www.execpc.com/~brikrn/ It's a great
> list of someone's novelty collection with a superb page of
> Beatle cash-ins.

Anyone in the mood for Clap Pat?    Regards  Robertgippy


--------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------


Message: 16
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 11:49:02 -0800
   From: "robert campbell"
Subject: Re: The Four Seasons' Name, the books are wrong.

> Doc wrote:
>
> > From my recent Bob Crewe interview:
> > "Where the name the Four Seasons came from? At that time,
> > I was dealing with a little store on the corner of 3rd
> > Avenue and 53rd Street that was called the Four Seasons
> > Antiques. That's where I first picked up on the name.

But what inquiring minds want to know is it true that
Franki Valli recorded the song "Ronnie" because  of
Ronnie Bennett?


--------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------


Message: 17
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 12:15:54 -0800
   From: "robert campbell"
Subject: Re: Bubblegum

My opinion of chewy chewy and yummy yummy being appealing
was that at that time, we were all going though  such a
dramatic change in the music culture. Once was serious
hard hitting rock (like quicksilver messenger service ,
Cream, Vanilla Fudge)  that everyone bonged, and
windowpaned through, (I was one of them!) was beginning
to become less attentive  and was to emerge into a more
so called "happier and elightened stuff".  Chewy Chewy
and Yummy Yummy was very sexually oriented as was the era
when it was released, however it was sung like June
Cleaver .   I think that it is why we liked it.  The
vietnam thing was rough for a lot of  us people and
listening to bubble gum just made life seem to be just a
tad easier to deal with.


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Message: 18
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 20:19:01 -0600
   From: "Cheryl Jennings"
Subject: Re: Superior covers

Gene Clark when playing that song over the years did play
it much slower than the Byrds recorded it and very much
like the Turtles recording. I would suspect he wrote it
with McGuinn in that way as he usually had his songs
speeded up when the Byrds arranged them.

Cheryl
~*~

> The story goes that Gene played "You Showed Me" to the
> Turtles on a old pump organ in the recording studio where
> he was forced to play the song very slowly. The Turtles
> based their version around his impromptu arrangement.
> Great Song! I like the mono single mix where the guitar
> lick in the chorus really jumps out - its mixed back on
> the stereo mix.
>
> Billy
>
> > Then there are the hit cover versions of songs that were
> > never hits in the first place.  My favorite in this
> > category is "You Showed Me." The original by the Byrds
> > (okay, "the Beefeaters") was a sloppy, Beatle-esque
> > diamond-in-the-rough.  It wasn't even considered good
> > enough to be included on the first Byrds album.  The
> > Turtles transformed this Gene Clark/Roger (Jim) McGuinn
> > tune into something sublime.
> >
> > Jim Cassidy


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Message: 19
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 22:49:48 -0500
   From: "Javed Jafri"
Subject: Re: Superior covers

Billy G. Spradlin wrote :
> The story goes that Gene played "You Showed Me" to the
> Turtles on a old pump organ in the recording studio where
> he was forced to play the song very slowly. The Turtles
> based their version around his impromptu arrangement.
> Great Song! I like the mono single mix where the guitar
> lick in the chorus really jumps out - its mixed back on
> the stereo mix.


I wonder when Gene Clark played them his version. If it
was during his first go round with the Byrds then the
Turtles must have kept the arangement in their heads for
a while or delayed releasing the song. The Turtles
version peaked on the charts in early 1969 which I think
was at least two or three years before the first release
of the Byrds Preflyte recordings.

On another Byrds related note. This morning on our local
classic rock station they read a few lines from "So You
Want to a Rock'n Roll Star" and asked callers to ID the
song and guess what I got through and identified the
song and won some sort of dinner and ski package. The
caller before me was somewhat clue-less and said that it
sounds like a Stones lyric. Nice to hear Q-107 ( Toronto)
play the tune. Not your average classic rock fare.

Javed


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Message: 20
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 23:40:42 -0500
   From: "Javed Jafri"
Subject: Re: Spector ........ Jack

> Den asked
> > I didn't realize Jack Spector did any music programming
> > for Radio Caroline. If anyone has more info on this, I'd
> > like to hear more about it. I'd love to know what songs
> > he included on this programming.
> >
> Well, the ones I remember include items like Run Mascara
> by the Exciters; Down in the Boondocks by Billy Joe
> Royal; Evening time by Elena; and something called That
> Boy of Mine by Lori Burton, which I can't remember (have
> I imagined it?); and Hang on Sloopy by the McCoys, and
> something by The Sheep - just great US sounds, the
> counterbalance to all those British beat groups.......

That would probably be "Hide and Seek" by the Sheep. The
Austrailian sheep farmers concocted by the team of
Feldman, Goldstien and Gottehrer on the Boom label. Great
record !

Javed


--------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------


Message: 21
   Date: Tue, 19 Feb 2002 00:04:03 -0500
   From: "Javed Jafri"
Subject: Re: Bubblegum

>From: "robert campbell"

> My opinion of chewy chewy and yummy yummy being appealing
> was that at that time, we were all going though such a
> dramatic change in the music culture. Once was serious
> hard hitting rock (like quicksilver messenger service ,
> Cream, Vanilla Fudge) that everyone bonged, and
> windowpaned through, (I was one of them!) was beginning
> to become less attentive and was to emerge into a more
> so called "happier and elightened stuff". Chewy Chewy
> and Yummy Yummy was very sexually oriented as was the era
> when it was released, however it was sung like June
> Cleaver

Well can you believe that as a 15 year when I became hip
and started listening to FM underground radio and albums
like "On The Threshold of A Dream" in the dark, I
actually scratched my copy of "I'm A Believer/Steppin
Stone" as a symbol of my disdain for bubblegum. That was
in 1969. Luckily I saw the light again. By the way one
of the best bubblegum influenced songs ever was "The Way
I Feel Tonight" by Flash Cadillac and The Continental
Kids released in 1973. It was the b-side of their version
of "Dancin' On A Saturday Night" and in my opinion the
superior side.

Javed


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Message: 22
   Date: Tue, 19 Feb 2002 15:56:15 +1030
   From: "Norman"
Subject: Re: April, Ellie and Gayle

Interesting that Ellie Greenwich would have recorded Tony
Macaulay's "(It's Like A) Sad Old Kinda Movie".  If it is
the same song it flopped for Pickettywitch.

Anyway, as much as I rate Macaulay as great, why would
Ellie Greenwich sing one of his songs.  Maybe I hold her
in too much esteem but I would imagine she could teach
him how to write a song or two.

Sir Norman

----- Original Message from: "Don Charles"

> I also recently acquired a copy of Ellie Greenwich's rare
> second single for Bell, "(It's Like A)Sad Old Kinda Movie."
> A member of the list supplied me with a promo copy (you
> know who you are, and I'm eternally grateful).  The
> topside is a pleasant Tony Macaulay tune, not too
> memorable, really, but the flipside!!!


--------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------


Message: 23
   Date: Tue, 19 Feb 2002 08:06:43 +0000
   From: Simon White
Subject: George Freeman

robert campbell wrote on 18/2/02 7:41 pm:

>
> One of my favories I played is "Down and Out" by George
> Freeman (Valiant #6039) arranged by Perry Botkin Jr.
> Very spectorish, with castanets, thunderous drumroll and
> strings.  The flip side called "The Quiver" sound like a
> Philles B Side throwaway, with Hal Blaine style drumrolls.

For the record [ ho ho ] I just sold my copy of this for
200 pounds . Considering I bought it for 25p I thought I
got a good deal.  It s nice but not 200 worth of nice. I
suggest anyone with a spare gets in quick !


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Message: 24
   Date: Tue, 19 Feb 2002 17:43:05 +1000
   From: "Lindsay Martin"
Subject: Ray Stevens: "Misty", boppin' down the sidewalk

Michael "Rashkovsky" Rashkow wrote
> I'm a Ray Stevens booster.  Think he is a big talent.

And, since we were discussing remakes, Stevens's "Misty"
is indeed the work of a big talent, one of those cases
where the rearrangement turns the original inside-out and
comes up with something startling and fresh and wonderful
(I'm on fairly safe ground in assuming the arrangement
was by Stevens himself, am I not?).

As for his crazy stuff, this image from "Harry the Hairy
Ape" still makes me smile: "...the near-sighted local DJ
Just boppin' down the sidewalk on his way to work with a
box of records on his arm that he was gonna play."

Lindsay


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Message: 25
   Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2002 09:04:30 EST
   From: Michael Rashkow
Subject: 101 Strings

In a message dated 2/15/2002, James Botticelli writes:


> A year later to be covered by Les Baxter on his


I had the opportunity to be assistant engineer on several
101 Strings sessions at Bell Sound.  I think the guy's
name was Dave Miller that did them.  Here's what they were
really.  4 violins, 02 viola and a cello overdubbed until
Dave thought he had enough. He always used to say, "101
strings?...at these prices they're lucky they get a hole
in the middle!"  ....and laugh and laugh.

RASHKOVKSY


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