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Spectropop - Digest Number 367





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       Digest #367                           January 29, 2002
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      I've often played Pet Sounds and cried. (Paul McCartney) 
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There are 18 messages in this issue.

Topics in this Digest Number 367:

      1. Re : Dean Martin/Bow Down and Worship
           From: "Frank" 
      2. Starsailor
           From: Brian Chidester 
      3. re: THE SANDPEBBLES
           From: Mick Patrick 
      4. Be My Baby - or else!
           From: "Phil Chapman" 
      5. Nilsson, Dino, Oldham, Clusters
           From: "Paul Payton" 
      6. Love Power
           From: "Vincent Degiorgio" 
      7. Jimmy Cross
           From: Thomas Taber 
      8. Re: Dusty
           From: Michael Rashkow 
      9. Dusty
           From: Carole Gibson 
     10. Dusty!
           From: "Don Charles" 
     11. re: JIMMY CROSS / THE JOYS
           From: Mick Patrick 
     12. Re: Favorite Jeff Barry Lyrics...
           From: "Don Charles" 
     13. Dusty Sings The Blues
           From: "Don Charles" 
     14. Re: Dusty!
           From: "Vincent Degiorgio" 
     15. Re: Favorite Jeff Barry Lyrics...
           From: "Vincent Degiorgio" 
     16. Crystals Woman In Love
           From: Alan Ackerman 
     17. Re: St.Cliff & St. Phil?
           From: "Guy Lawrence" 
     18. Brian in London
           From: Richard Williams 


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 1
   Date: Sun, 27 Jan 2002 10:08:47 +0100
   From: "Frank" 
Subject: Re : Dean Martin/Bow Down and Worship

John Briggs wrote:
>
> It is good to see mentioned "The King of Cool" on the
> Spectropop postings earlier today.
>
> One of Dino's best 60's cuts on Reprise has an excellent
> 10 note bass line in the intro...... also repeated
> throughout the song. It also features fake ambient party
> chatter/noise.  The cut is "Open Up The Door... And Let
> The Good Times In" It charted at #55 back in '66.

I couldn't agree more. Might just add that not only
Collectors are releasing all his Reprise Lps on a series
of 2 on 1 but also Bear Family, known for their
incredibly well researched and packaged box sets after
having done two boxes of everything (and more) he did at
Capitol have not just launched another two boxes of
everything he did while at Reprise.

Frank

 


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Message: 2
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 04:28:30 EST
   From: Brian Chidester 
Subject: Starsailor

I was at a party with the guys from Starsailor. 
Supposedly, they have already been in the studio with
Phil.  We'll see what happens.  I stumbled upon them
because Steve Nice had been putting ads for Starsailor
shows in the L.A. Weekly that had three girls in Mod
outfits.  Their music is still good, even if, when I got
there, the group was five UK blokes who drink beer.

BC


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Message: 3
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 11:06:57 +0000 (GMT)
   From: Mick Patrick 
Subject: re: THE SANDPEBBLES

Greetings,

Thanks to Rashkovsky for sharing with us the story
behind Dusty Springfield's "What Good Is I Love You".
I'm so glad I asked that question. I had a gut feeling
that there was a tale waiting to be told. And I was
right.

I'd like to pounce on Mike's paragraph concerning
producer TEDDY VANN purloining a Greenwich/Rashkow
backing-track and turning it into a SANDPEBBLES
record...

> Of course, Teddy Vann once cut a song (Ellie and I)
> wrote, with his group the Sandpebbles, then took the
> track, wrote his own song over it, and released it
> that way. Title "FORGET IT". That's not very nice
> either. But hey, it's a five o'clock world when the
> whistle blows, right? The original song? I forgot it!
> Maybe if I heard the (Sandpebbles') record again the
> thing might come back to me.

The Sandpebbles were a group of former gospel singers
fronted by the wonderful LONZINE WRIGHT, owner of one of
the most remarkable voices I have ever heard (she makes
Judy Clay sound like Shelley Fabares!). The group had a
big hit with "LOVE POWER" at Christmastime 1967. Their
complete output, including "FORGET IT" and sixteen (count
'em) unissued tracks, is available for all to hear on
their 28-track CD "WE GOT LOVE POWER" (UK Westside WESM
609, 2000). All in stereo. I helped write the booklet for
this CD, one of the toughest assignments I ever had.
Here's a sample paragraph:

Lonzine Wright, Andrea Bolden and Calvin White cast off
their gospel robes in 1967 and teamed up to form a
secular group called the Natives. They pacted with
manager Art D'Lugoff - owner of famed New York night-club
the Village Gate - and writer-producer Teddy Vann who
soon had them in Bell Sound Studios recording their debut
single "Forget It". By the time the record was released
by the Calla label the group had been re-dubbed the
Sandpebbles, a name no doubt inspired by the then recent
Steve McQueen movie...."Forget It" provided the group
with a #81 hit on the Billboard Hot 100. The disc reached
#10 on the R'n'B chart...

According to the label "Forget It" was produced by Teddy
Vann and written by him with Calvin White. No mention of
Rashkow or Greenwich. Whatever, it's a very powerful
record. The group subsequently changed their name to C &
the Shells. By the way, Mr Vann had a habit of recycling
backing tracks. But that's another story...

MICK PATRICK


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Message: 4
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 12:23:39 -0000
   From: "Phil Chapman" 
Subject: Be My Baby - or else!

"Be My Baby"

How the genius of Phil Spector and Ronnie Spector met and
created a song of magnificent carnality.

By Stephanie Zacharek

http://www.salon.com/ent/masterpiece/2002/01/28/be_my_baby/index.html


another good read!
Phil


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Message: 5
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 09:53:56 -0500
   From: "Paul Payton" 
Subject: Nilsson, Dino, Oldham, Clusters

David: re: Harry Nilsson, I wonder too about whether
Jimmie Cross=Nilsson, since I have both the Jimmie Cross
45's and the reference seemed inconsistent. However, I
welcome proof either way....

Nice to see Kenny Dino on musica; Martin (Roberts, not
Dean) gets it right. If you don't know it, check out his
"greatest hit" - Musicor 1012, "Your Ma Said You Cried In
Your Sleep Last Night" - two chords of deliciously
anxious power pop!

Phil Chapman: the Andrew Loog Oldham article
echoes perfectly the religious experience I also felt
watching the same concert - except I'd give more props to
the Wondermints. It was one of the best concerts I've
ever seen - or will ever see.

Incidentally, it's too bad Mr. Oldham never opened up
like that when he came to WHCN in Hartford for an early
70's interview - it went much to the tune of, "So, Andrew,
what was it like working with the Stones?" "Okay." "Any
stories you'd like to share?" "Nope." "So this new group
>from here in Connecticut, Repairs...." "They're okay."
And more of similar stuff - "...but that was once upon a
time, many years ago."

Repairs, by the way, were a very pleasant folk-rock-type
group with one particularly nice song, "Oh Lonesome
Sorrow," on Rare Earth (!).

By the way, Phil, just one more doo-wop backing - the
incredible bass at the beginning of the Clusters'
"Darling Can't You Tell (Tee Gee, 1958)" "Ohh-lala,
ooh-lala, ohh-la la la la...," my all-time favorite group
harmony record - a great vocal group, solid instrumental
backing (with a flute obligato and some rhythmic
surprises) and a thrilling dual lead vocal, largely on
open fourths, with the phenomenal Arlene Smith of the
Chantels! By the way, according to an interview with Don
K. Reed, the group went into the studio, did all the
intricacies live by themselves, and went home; when they
heard the song on the radio, Arlene Smith had been dubbed
onto it without their prior knowledge. But she made a
good record into magic!

Finally - in my last post, those cookies were Keebler's,
not the typo caused by the sugar rush from too many
cookies! :-)

Country Paul


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Message: 6
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 09:59:48 -0500
   From: "Vincent Degiorgio" 
Subject: Love Power

Unknown to many, prior to Luther Vandross' medley reading
of Love Power, the song  was also cut by disco pop artist
Roberta Kelly . Kelly's version was produced by Giorgio
Moroder and if you can find the vinyl in a bin on her
"Trouble Maker " album it's worth the purchase even for
curiosity. It's good stuff.

Vincent

"Mick Patrick" wrote:


> The Sandpebbles were a group of former gospel singers
> fronted by the wonderful LONZINE WRIGHT, owner of one of
> the most remarkable voices I have ever heard (she makes
> Judy Clay sound like Shelley Fabares!). The group had a
> big hit with "LOVE POWER" at Christmastime 1967. Their
> complete output, including "FORGET IT" and sixteen (count
> 'em) unissued tracks, is available for all to hear on
> their 28-track CD "WE GOT LOVE POWER" (UK Westside WESM
> 609, 2000). All in stereo. I helped write the booklet for
> this CD, one of the toughest assignments I ever had.
> Here's a sample paragraph:
>


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Message: 7
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 07:55:14 -0800 (PST)
   From: Thomas Taber 
Subject: Jimmy Cross

I remember seeing an obit. on Jimmy Cross in Billboard
maybe 15 years ago; I think he was 39 when he passed
on. 


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Message: 8
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 16:56:49 EST
   From: Michael Rashkow 
Subject: Re: Dusty

> I find it hard to believe that Dusty would replace a US
> drummer with a UK drummer, with what was written about
> her feelings towards UK musicians in her early 60's years.
> 
> 
Trust me.  I couldn't make up such a bubba meiser. 


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Message: 9
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 18:15:32 +0000
   From: Carole Gibson 
Subject: Dusty

I would echo Mick Patrick in saying what a fascinating
story from Mike Rashkow on the recording of Dusty's What
Good Is I Love You.  I always thought Ellie did the
backing on that record but now know differently.  I am
told however, that she did sing on Dusty's Don't Say It
Baby, anyone know if Ellie was on anything else?

Should there be many other inhabitants of Planet Dusty on
this site, if you haven't yet found the book The Complete
Dusty Springfield written by Paul Howes, the editor of the
Dusty Springfield Bulletin, then search it out. Every song
Dusty ever recorded is covered with anecdotes and details.
Practically everything you would need to know about her
music, TV and live appearances, is in there.

A recent thread about Jeff Barry produced tracks, made me
think of the ones he did with Dusty.  Her Live Here With
You, is one of my favourite Dusty tracks ever.  On this
song, Jeff Barry didn't surround her with sound, the
production is minimal and it leaves Dusty's voice at it's
most childlike and vulnerable, it's incredibly intimate
and like nothing else she ever did.  In fact, on all the
Barry tracks, Dusty shone, he took her in all directions,
rock, gospel, soft rock (as in You've Got A Friend, which
pre-dates James Taylor).  He appreciated her range and
diversity, seems to have enjoyed the experience of working
with her and what a pity that it took almost 30 years for
some of these tracks to see the light of day.

Regards
Carole 


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Message: 10
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 20:39:02 +0000
   From: "Don Charles" 
Subject: Dusty!

Speaking of Dusty Springfield, I don't think anyone
produced her better than she produced herself (in
collaboration with Johnny Franz and others).  In my
opinion, her best album of the '60s is DUSTY . . .
DEFINITELY, followed closely by WHERE AM I GOING,
EV'RYTHING'S COMING UP DUSTY and DUSTY IN MEMPHIS.  No
disrespect to Gamble and Huff and their associates, but
I feel that BRAND NEW ME doesn't rate too high when
compared to her other albums, and I think that has to do
with the lack of eclecticism (every track a Gamble/Huff
copyright with similar arrangements).  There are some
great songs on there, though, like "The Star Of My Show."
SEE ALL HER FACES suffers because of the tracks included
by outside producers - to my ears, they stick out like a
sore thumb.  Despite its committee of producers, I do
like REPUTATION quite a bit.  In fact, I think of it as
her last great album, but I think I enjoy her
self-produced WHITE HEAT set a little bit more.  There's
no Dusty Springfield studio album I downright hate, but
VERY FINE LOVE comes uncomfortably close.

Don Charles


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Message: 11
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 16:57:38 +0000 (GMT)
   From: Mick Patrick 
Subject: re: JIMMY CROSS / THE JOYS

> Original Message from Thomas Taber:
> I remember seeing an obit. on Jimmy Cross in Billboard
> maybe 15 years ago; I think he was 39 when he passed
> on.

Greetings,

Correct, Tom, the late Jimmy "I Want My Baby Back" Cross
and the late Harry Nilsson were not one and the same
person. I could not operate without a copy Joel
Whitburn's Top Pop Singles www.recordresearch.com at my
side. Here's what the book says about Jimmy Cross:

"Appeared in the 1957 movie The Amazing Colossal Man.
Co-founded a production company with Larry Cox (producer
of Jefferson Starship). Produced the syndicated radio
series Country Concert. Died August 10th 1978 (aged 39)
of a heart attack." Succinct, huh?

But in my view, what I am most grateful to Jimmy Cross
for is not the above-mentioned Shangri Las-inspired "sick
disc" or his Chicken/Red Bird 45 "Hey Little Girl" but
THE JOYS' "I STILL LOVE HIM" (Valiant) which he co-wrote.
What a great track that is.

MICK PATRICK
 


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Message: 12
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 20:45:49 +0000
   From: "Don Charles" 
Subject: Re: Favorite Jeff Barry Lyrics...

Isn't that Baby I Love You by Andy Kim ??

No, the lyrics I quoted are from Andy's "How'd We Ever
Get This Way." I'll probably get my head bitten off for
saying this, but I actually prefer Andy's version of
"Baby, I Love You" to the Ronettes' original.  Jeff
Barry's arrangement is so haunting . . . however, his
remake of "Be My Baby" doesn't have the same impact.  I
doubt that The Ronettes' single will ever be bettered.

Don Charles


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Message: 13
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 22:39:14 +0000
   From: "Don Charles" 
Subject: Dusty Sings The Blues

I would echo Mick Patrick in saying what a fascinating
story from Mike Rashkow on the recording of Dusty's What
Good Is I Love You. I always thought Ellie did the
backing on that record but now know differently.

I still think that's Miss Ellie in the background on that
single!  I'm absolutely sure that's her singing "Why
should I still love you . . ."  Didn't Dusty use the
original Greenwich-Rashkow backing vocal track?

A recent thread about Jeff Barry produced tracks, made me
think of the ones he did with Dusty. Her Live Here
With You, is one of my favourite Dusty tracks ever. On
this song, Jeff Barry didn't surround her with sound, the
production is minimal and it leaves Dusty's voice at it's
most childlike and vulnerable, it's incredibly intimate
and like nothing else she ever did. In fact, on all the
Barry tracks, Dusty shone, he took her in all directions,
rock, gospel, soft rock (as in You've Got A Friend, which
pre-dates James Taylor). He appreciated her range and
diversity, seems to have enjoyed the experience of
working with her and what a pity that it took almost 30
years for some of these tracks to see the light of day.

When I interviewed him, Jeff told me he definitely did
enjoy working with Dusty.  Knowing him, with an
exceptional vocalist like her, his tendency would be to
almost underproduce, and that's probably why some of the
backing tracks have a minimalist flavor.  I've
unofficially titled this album DUSTY SINGS THE BLUES, due
to its heavy blues and gospel orientation, and I'd be
thrilled to see it released as a CD in its own right,
instead of scattered over two CDs as "bonus tracks," the
way Rhino did it.  Incidentally, if anyone else was as
disappointed as I was that the LP cuts were issued with
almost no songwriter information, let me fill in a few of
the blanks . . .

I'll Be Faithful  (Ned Albright, Mike and Steve Soles)
All The King's Horses  (Aretha Franklin)
Someone Who Cares  (Alex Harvey)
Make It With You  (David Gates)
Love Shine  (Neil Goldberg) UNCONFIRMED
Haunted  (Jeff Barry, Bobby Bloom)
Natchez Trace  (Neil Goldberg, Gil Slavin)
(You Ask Me To) Live Here With You  (Gil Slavin, Mike Soles)
Have A Good Life, Baby (Neil Goldberg) UNCONFIRMED
Nothing Is Forever  (Jeff Barry, Bobby Bloom)
You've Got A Friend  (Carole King)
I Have Found My Way Through The Darkness (Gil Slavin, Mike Soles)
I Believe In You  (Jeff Barry)

Don Charles


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Message: 14
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 19:41:29 -0500
   From: "Vincent Degiorgio" 
Subject: Re: Dusty!

One of Dusty's best, but unknown tracks was an early 80's
nugget she did with The Buggles on Mercury called "Baby
Blue". This captures her in what some might feel was a
down period, but it is a great song and her voice cuts
through it beautifully. To my knowledge it was only
released as a single in the UK and on 12"...

Vincent


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Message: 15
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 19:42:34 -0500
   From: "Vincent Degiorgio" 
Subject: Re: Favorite Jeff Barry Lyrics...

----- Original Message from: "Don Charles"

> Isn't that Baby I Love You by Andy Kim ??
>
> No, the lyrics I quoted are from Andy's "How'd We Ever
> Get This Way." 

Thanks Don. Sometimes when you start singing these
things in your head and they've had so many hits, you
make your own medleys without realizing.

I stand corrected,

Vincent


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Message: 16
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 23:35:45 -0000
   From: Alan Ackerman 
Subject: Crystals Woman In Love

I am looking everywhere for an MP 3 of the Crystals'
version of "Woman In Love With You."  Can any of you guys
help me out on this?

A desperate Monophonius


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Message: 17
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 21:27:54 -0000
   From: "Guy Lawrence" 
Subject: Re: St.Cliff & St. Phil?

Justin McDevitt wrote.....

> When I comtemplate an eternity in heaven, however that will look
> or be, I know that there will be a giant listening room
> with perfect acoustics an a cosmic sound system which I
> can visit at my leisure to listen to the music that
> helped to sustain me through the rough times and lifted
> me up in affirming the good memories, positive learning
> experiences and loving people that shaped my life and
> character while on this earth. DO I HEAR AN AMEN!

....sounds great Justin! There's just one thing I
need to know before I convert - will there be Round
Robin in heaven? Guy


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Message: 18
   Date: Mon, 28 Jan 2002 09:46:39 +0000
   From: Richard Williams 
Subject: Brian in London

Brian's first night at the Festival Hall was a deserved
triumph. The mixed bag of the first half contained many
highlights -- and reminded me that I once wanted the whole
world to be exactly like "Don't Worry Baby" -- but the
complete recital of Pet Sounds was a dream come true.
Special congratulations to all the 10 musicians for their
devotion: there was a sense that the songs were being
curated with immense care and understanding. And what
beautiful orchestral detailing. French horn! banjo!
Theremin! Bass harmonica! These things, as the man said,
I'll keep until I die.

Richard Williams


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