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Spectropop - Digest Number 360




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             greatly reduces intermodulation distortion
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There are 20 messages in this issue of Spectropop.

Topics in this Digest Number 360:

      1. Bow Down & Worship?
           From: "Martin Roberts" 
      2. Valiant Effort, etc.
           From: "Paul Payton" 
      3. Grace of My Heart
           From: Jimmy Crescitelli 
      4. Valiant records
           From: "Kingsley Abbott" 
      5. Re: Grace of My Heart
           From: Don Baylis 
      6. Re:Autumn Records
           From: tymespan 
      7. Re: Jeff Barry's Greatest Hits
           From: "Don Charles" 
      8. Jeff Barry and Friends
           From: "Don Charles" 
      9. Going to the Chapel? You're gonna get Mary.
           From: "Spector Collector" 
     10. Dancing With The Majors
           From: "Martin Roberts" 
     11. Re :When songwriting starts to suck
           From: Frank 
     12. Distant Cousins
           From: "Den Lindquist" 
     13. Re: Distant Cousins
           From: "Mikey" 
     14. Re :When songwriting starts to suck
           From: "Vincent Degiorgio" 
     15. Re: Various
           From: Michael Rashkow 
     16. The Jaynettes
           From: "Tony Leong " 
     17. RE: Bow Down & Worship?
           From: "Keith Beach" 
     18. Re: Various
           From: "Keith Beach" 
     19. Remixing Spector
           From: Paul Underwood 
     20. The Jaynettes / Big Dee Irwin
           From: simon white 


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Message: 1
   Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 18:43:31 -0000
   From: "Martin Roberts" 
Subject: Bow Down & Worship?

With George Harrison's "My Sweet Lord" sitting on top of
the British charts Mr Spector has now had 6 decades of Top
Ten Hits in the UK.

Wooooh!!!....... Way To Go Phil!!
 
Martin


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Message: 2
   Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 01:26:33 -0500
   From: "Paul Payton" 
Subject: Valiant Effort, etc.

Wow! Martin Roberts, thank you for the "Valiant effort."
I'd forgotten about George Freeman - "Down and Out" is
great! And Shelby Flint - you reminded me of how much I
liked "Wonderland" when it was new. Sure she was airy and
delicate - but so was Priscilla Paris! Hey, CCM, I'll buy
that collection too! (And yes, I also like Barry & The
Tamerlanes....)

Stewart Mason wrote:
>"Concrete & Clay" ... is this the same song that was a 
> UK hit for Unit 4+2?

Absolutely - "they were "dueling covers." I prefer
Rambeau personally; a little more open in feeling than
the Unit 4+2.

Also, thinking about DynoVoice: The Distant Cousins, "To
Have And To Hold" - same era, wonderful soft pop. Another
Crewe triumph. I think they also had a 45 on Date (CBS)
afterward, but it might have been a reissue of the same
song.

And thanks, Stewart and David Feldman, for the "Grace of
My Heart" reviews. I see a video rental in the near
future.

Someone mentioned "Celebrities At Their Worst" - Ernie
Anderson (ABC promos for "The Luuuv Boat") swearing up a
storm is on one of those.

More whenever,
Country Paul


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Message: 3
   Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 01:52:42 EST
   From: Jimmy Crescitelli 
Subject: Grace of My Heart

I really got a huge kick out of Bridget Fonda's gorgeous,
dead-on (even down to the giant flip hairdo!) take on
Lesley Gore, as the voice-over singer Miss Lily
Banquette warbled "My Secret Love, " as the character's
girlfriend watched from the studio sidelines... After
seeing the movie, I had to have the CD so I could play
this cut nine million times. Imagine my delight when I
saw that Miss Gore herself wrote the song!  And the
haunting spoken voice closing: "You and I... we are like
spies in the house of holy love... we are actors in a
heartless play... I smile my smile and play my part and
forever hide my lonely heart... my secret love." GO
LESLEY!!  And I agree that Ileana's cuts should have
been on the CD... they're excellent. Her "God Give Me
Strength" is poignant and heartrending and totally
honest. Beautiful.


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Message: 4
   Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 11:53:20 -0000
   From: "Kingsley Abbott" 
Subject: Valiant records

Also on Valiant was a fave of mine - after many Beach
Boys soundalikes, there was a full on Jan & Dean cop
called "Big T" from The Reveres.

I also like "Grace Of My Heart"...I Do, I Do, I Do...   
Strange the way 'Carole King' metamorphed into 'Marilyn
Wilson' half way through!  Certainly a
must-see-at-least-once for everyone on the list.

Kingsley Abbott


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Message: 5
   Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 17:18:00 -0000
   From: Don Baylis 
Subject: Re: Grace of My Heart

A film enjoyable enough for me to have purchased the video
.. and then the CD .. however, a real bummer in that
instead of the powerfully sung female version of 'God Give
Me Strength' we are forced to suffer the Elvis Costello
abomination. The least that should have been done was to
offer the Original Soundtrack as shown, and then, if they
absolutely had to, add on the Costello version as an extra.
(or a minus).

Don Baylis


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Message: 6
   Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 13:08:39 EST
   From: tymespan 
Subject: Re:Autumn Records

> When I was
> music-directing radio, a package from Autumn was always
> opened first; they had a rep for "getting it" - and with
> Donahue and Sly at the helm, it only made/makes sense.
> Can someone direct me to a history/discography, please?

The Sundazed label  in the US and Big Beat in the UK have
released a large part of the Autumn catalog. Besides the
previously mentioned Mojo Men CDs, Sundazed has a
Vejtables CD  & Great Society CD of all their Autumn
recordings. Big Beat has a  comp CD in their Nuggets From
the Golden States series called Dance With Me-The Autumn
Teen Sound. 30 tracks including The Tikis (early Harpers
Bizarre), Mojo Men, Vejtables and many previously
unreleased tracks. The Tikis are especially great, more of
a garage /folk rock sound than their records as the
Harpers Bizarre but with their trademark harmonies.


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Message: 7
   Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 19:24:04 +0000
   From: "Don Charles" 
Subject: Re: Jeff Barry's Greatest Hits

>From: "Ken Levine"
>
> How about the Raindrops "It's So Wonderful"? 
> That would make my top 25.

No doubt there are countless variations on a Top 25 Jeff
Barry productions list.  I strongly encourage
Spectorpoppers to post their own lists of favorites! 
Perhaps we can determine what the most popular JB-produced
records are.  Soon, I'll post a list of must-hear rare
productions by the King of The Bubblegum Blues.

Don Charles


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Message: 8
   Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 19:37:54 +0000
   From: "Don Charles" 
Subject: Jeff Barry and Friends

>I've just learned that a soundtrack CD to last year's PBS
>bomb, the Jeff Barry tribute "Chapel of Love," is being
>issued next week with a delightful bonus: Ronnie
>Spector's version of "River Deep, Mountain High," which
>she didn't perform on the broadcast or home video
>versions.

It will be interesting to hear how Ronnie interprets this
classic song.

Although video production values on the special sucked, no
doubt contributing to the show's lack of success as a
fund-raiser, the performances, including those by Dee Dee
and her Crystals, were generally quite good.

I can't disagree with you about the production values. 
The special was never shown in my area (Kansas City).  If
I hadn't have bought the VHS, I'd never have seen it. 
Personally, I had mixed feelings about the show, and I
suspect Jeff Barry did, too . . . he sang a version of his
1973 country song "Walkin' In The Sun" (later covered by
Gene Pitney and Glen Campbell) which was unfortunately
edited out of the film.  Some of the performances didn't
impress me much.  However, I adored Jana Anderson's
performance of "Leader Of The Pack," and Deniece Williams
and Jeffrey Osborne were both in excellent voice.

Don Charles


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Message: 9
   Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 17:24:20 +0000
   From: "Spector Collector" 
Subject: Going to the Chapel? You're gonna get Mary.

Last night just before bedtime, I posted to Spectropop
that a CD containing a previously unreleased live Ronnie
Spector performance of "River Deep, Mountain High" was set
for release next week. This was based on information I
found at 
http://www.half.com/cat/buy/prod.cgi?cpid=1079542200&domain_id=1876

However, with the benefit of a good night's sleep, I
realize with near certainty that this must be a misprint
and that the version of the song on the CD will be the one
performed on the TV special of which it is the soundtrack,
namely by Mary Wilson.

I apologize to anyone that I inadvertently got as excited
as I got myself by believing what I read.  If by some
incredible chance it turns out that the track really is by
Ronnie, I'll certainly let you all know! David


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Message: 10
   Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 19:29:30 -0000
   From: "Martin Roberts" 
Subject: Dancing With The Majors

Great to read the chat about The Majors. The Collectables
CD is an essential purchase, even allowing for its limited
number of tracks and complete absence of credits. Annoying
for Spectropoppers though, it still leaves searching for
the Imperial 45 "Tra La La"/"What Have You Been Doing" the
B-Side being a Greenwich/Barry composition, which would
have fitted nicely on the Raindrops LP.

I love the sound of The Boys Next Door as well. First 45 I
bought was the Tokens production "There Is No Greater Sin"
Co-Wr (topically) Al Cooper/"I Could See Me Dancing With
You" Cameo. None of there other records quite lived up to
the standard of this but then, not many records by anyone
do! Another single from the jukebox! I would list the
Sundazed CD (this time of course great sleeve notes, 22
tracks-inc. unreleased and credits!) another must-have.

Martin


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Message: 11
   Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 15:00:08 +0100
   From: Frank 
Subject: Re :When songwriting starts to suck

Bob Conway wrote:

> Try the new Elton John/Bernie Taupin CD--for whatever
> reason the early magic is back...at least for this CD.

I have to listen to this Elton John CD, I've been told
the same thing several times. It seems most people agree
he's back in form.

Frank


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Message: 12
   Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 20:45:23 -0500
   From: "Den Lindquist" 
Subject: Distant Cousins

----- Original Message From: Paul Payton
>
> Also, thinking about DynoVoice: The Distant Cousins, "To
> Have And To Hold" - same era, wonderful soft pop. Another
> Crewe triumph. I think they also had a 45 on Date (CBS)
> afterward, but it might have been a reissue of the same
> song.

The Distant Cousins had 4 singles on Date, all non-Crewe
material from 1966-67:

Date 1501 "Gently Goodbye"  b/w   "No More You" 
Date 1514 "Here Today, Gone Tomorrow"  b/w  " She Ain't Lovin' You"
Date 1542 "Stop Runnin' 'Round, Baby"  b/w " Take This Woman"
Date 1560 "Empty House"  b/w " Mister Sebastian" (reference to
John Sebastian)

I have all four singles; if anyone's interested, I can
put them to musica.

One other single exists:

Dynovoice 208  "Slipped Your Mind"  b/w "Empty House"
(this may be an earlier version of Date 1560).



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Message: 13
   Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 23:29:53 -0500
   From: "Mikey" 
Subject: Re: Distant Cousins

Den....could you put all the 45s to musica so we can hear
'em?

thanks!

Mikey

----- Original Message From: "Den Lindquist"

> The Distant Cousins had 4 singles on Date, all non-Crewe
> material from 1966-67:
>
> Date 1501 "Gently Goodbye"  b/w   "No More You"
> Date 1514 "Here Today, Gone Tomorrow"  b/w  " She Ain't Lovin' You"
> Date 1542 "Stop Runnin' 'Round, Baby"  b/w " Take This Woman"
> Date 1560 "Empty House"  b/w " Mister Sebastian" (reference to
> John Sebastian)
>
> I have all four singles; if anyone's interested, I can
> put them to musica.


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Message: 14
   Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 23:35:35 -0500
   From: "Vincent Degiorgio" 
Subject: Re :When songwriting starts to suck

I'm split on the new Elton. It feels country for him...
Call me crazy, but I guess I have to revisit

Vincent


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Message: 15
   Date: Tue, 22 Jan 2002 16:02:12 EST
   From: Michael Rashkow 
Subject: Re: the subject of theories about backsliding song writers


While I found the various theories interesting, I  think
they all beg the question, how come it didn't happen to:
Gershwin, Berlin, Loesser, Mercer, Rogers, Hammerstein,
Hart, Van Heusen, etc.  Or are we talking about a
different league?

> RE: Does anyone  in Spectropopland have a track listing
> for the Jaynets album  Sally Go Round The Roses on Tuff ?

I don't have it, but I know that Sally was cut at
Broadway Recording, with Pat Jaques on the board.  And
Artie Butler was responsible for the "arrangement" as
well as the keyboards. It may have been Butler's first
arranger credit. I was told that it was originally a
"country" song.  I don't know about that, but the lyric
sounds like maybe.

Also out of  the same small Broadway Recording came a
real NYC classic--and a record I love so much it hurts
me--Smokey Places, The Corsairs (featuring Jay Bird Uzell???).
I labor under the handicap of having none of my vinyl for
reference on these details.   Anyway,  somebody please
write out the words to those background/bass parts, I'm
tired of faking it.  And doesn't this one really sound
like it may have been a country song?

  
Rashkovsky


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Message: 16
   Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2002 05:01:32 -0000
   From: "Tony Leong " 
Subject: The Jaynettes

Most copies that I see for sale of the Jaynettes LP
sometimes go for over $200!!!  Based on how much I love
"Sally Go Round The Roses" and "Dear Abby", I often
wondered about WHO was in the group(s), and what exactly
those ladies were singing about.  Of course, I read the
liner notes from the back of the LP, but even THAT info.
about the members mentioned turned out to be erroneous,
and I found that out thanks to John Clemente and my
friend Frank Johnson.

 Luckily, another friend taped the entire Lp and some
 follow-up singles for me on a cassette, and I kept
 saying to myself that the Jaynettes were ahead of their
 time.  Many of their songs were pre- Psychedelic believe
 it or not.  For instance, a single "Snowman Snowman
 Sweet Potatoe Nose" contains lyrics like "...toot toot
 high, toot toot low, go cat go....blow your nose..."
 Whoa--risque for 1963!!! And "Dear Abby"..."go out in
 the yard and eat worms.."  And all of the songs were
 arranged to sound like nursery rhymes-- amazing!!! 

I wish someone out there would put out a definitive
Jaynettes compilation.  That material is certainly
different than that of the other girl groups of the
time--and very few people know that unfortunately!!!  If
someone out there can also tell me what "Sally Go Round
The Roses" is really about other than adultery, let me
know!! I just can't comprehend the other rumours that
I've heard upon listening to that classic--Clemente, can
you help???  Tony


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Message: 17
   Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2002 07:55:19 -0000
   From: "Keith Beach" 
Subject: RE: Bow Down & Worship?

Martin Roberts wrote

> With George Harrison's "My Sweet Lord" sitting on top of
> the British charts Mr Spector has now had 6 decades of Top
> Ten Hits in the UK.
> 
> Wooooh!!!....... Way To Go Phil!!

Is this single the recently revamped version from the
album "All things must pass"...where George tried to
eliminate as much of Phil's excesses (in George's opinion)
as possible. I read that George apparently thought that
the original production sounded too 'old-fashioned'. I
haven't yet got this new version to compare what George
thought was better than the album that gave him the
biggest seller of his career. I'd much rather Phil was
having a hit with new material instead of reissues.

BTW Martin, remind us what Phil's hit(s) were in the 90's.
50's = Teddy Bears
60's = a couple of records we might remember
70's = John Lennon/George Harrison etc
80's = Ramones
90's = ????


Keith Beach 


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Message: 18
   Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2002 08:11:14 -0000
   From: "Keith Beach" 
Subject: Re: Various

Michael Rashkow (is that pronounced 'cow' or 'kov'?)
wrote

> I  think they all beg the question, how come it didn't
> happen to: Gershwin, Berlin, Loesser, Mercer, Rogers,
> Hammerstein, Hart, Van Heusen, etc.  Or are we talking
> about a different league?
> 
Well Gershwin G died young, and Ira definitely faded.
Hart also died youngish. Rodgers got a second wind by
teaming with Hammerstein (they also wrote a couple of  TV
musicals that stink). But although they mostly had
longevity they had many many flops along the way. The
muse seems to come and go. Some burn bright at the start
of their careers, others build to a crescendo. Because of
the medium songwriters wrote for, stage musicals or
throwaway pop singles, they shouldn't be judged as
superior/inferior.

Keith Beach


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Message: 19
   Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2002 10:59:20 +0100
   From: Paul Underwood 
Subject: Remixing Spector

For me, the jury is still out on George Harrison's "All
things must pass": I'm not sure I want to hear all the
instruments. From the same period, though, I have been
listening to Eric Clapton's Spector- produced songs,
"Tell the truth" and "Roll it over", which were remixed
in 1987 for his "Crossroads" set. The remixes sound (to
these ears) dull and lifeless, as if the intention really
was to remove all trace of Spector. I find that all the
more surprising as Spector told Rolling Stone (in an
interview about Imagine) that the echo on his recordings
couldn't be removed. So how was it done?

One other thing: don't forget that Phil Spector remixed
"Let it be" as well as the Ramones' original version of
"Rock 'n' roll high school". So he can't really complain,
can he.

Paul


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Message: 20
   Date: Wed, 23 Jan 2002 10:25:26 +0000
   From: simon white 
Subject: The Jaynettes / Big Dee Irwin

Thanks for all the Jaynettes  info, men. Now I need some
help on something else. Did I dream it or has Big Dee
Irwin s  "Happy Being Fat'  been released on cd at some
point ?  I sure  I saw it somewhere but the brain has
gone....


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