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Spectropop V#0070

  • From: The Spectropop Group
  • Date: 4/16/98
  •    ================================================
                     S P E C T R O P O P !      
       ================================================
           Volume #0070                    04/18/98
       ================================================
       Apply the same care as with conventional records
    
    
    
    
    
    Subject:     All Strung Out
    Sent:        4/16/98 2:34 AM
    Received:    4/16/98 6:35 AM
    From:        Marc Miller, marXXX@XXXXXXom
    To:          'spectroXXX@XXXXXXies.com', spectroXXX@XXXXXXies.com
    
    The fab song All Strung Out is currently available on "Nino Tempo &
    April Stevens: Sweet and Lovely - the best of"  Varese Vintage 5592.
    
    Marc
    
    ---[ archived by Spectropop - 04 /17/98 - 12:59:24 AM ]---
    
    Subject:     Claudine Longet
    Sent:        4/16/98 5:51 AM
    Received:    4/17/98 12:22 AM
    From:        Marie-J. Leclerc, XXX@XXXXXXron.ca
    To:          Spectropop  List, spectroXXX@XXXXXXies.com
    
    I was browsing at the used cd/vinyl shop and what did I 
    find? A Claudine Longet album, called, "We've only just 
    begun". I recall Claudine from that funny movie, "The 
    Party", where she befriended a clumsy and hilarious Peter 
    Sellers. I didnt know she had recorded albums, so, can 
    anyone tell me if there are others available? I really enjoy 
    that one, songs like "Cry me a river", "Close to you (they 
    long to be)", are done in a delicate way, very refreshing. 
    "Ain't no mountain high enough" is done with French lyrics, 
    courtesy of Ms Longet. Now, if only there were liners as for 
    the date and musicians, that would top it all. 
    
    Any infos on Claudine would be welcome, Thanks, Marie
    
    ---[ archived by Spectropop - 04 /17/98 - 12:59:24 AM ]---
    
    Subject:     Re: All Strung Out
    Sent:        4/16/98 4:19 AM
    Received:    4/16/98 6:35 AM
    From:        BashPop, BashXXX@XXXXXXm
    To:          Spectropop  List, spectroXXX@XXXXXXies.com
    
    
    << Subject:     Re: All Strung Out
      From:        Jamie LePage, le_page_XXX@XXXXXXies.com
     
     Bobby Lloyd wrote:
     
     >Nino Tempo and April Stevens album "All Strung Out". 
      
     >It's one of my all-time favorite records! I wanna hear it 
     >so bad.
     
    << That's really interesting because I remember it being one of  
     my favorites too. I wanna hear it so bad too; my vinyl copy 
     is in storage several thousand miles away from my 
     turntable. :-(>>
    
    Hi everyone,
    
    If you want to hear the "All Strung Out" album so bad, send 
    me a private e-mail and I'll make arrangements to tape it 
    for you.
    
    Spectropop Rules!!!!!
    Take Care,
    David
     
    ---[ archived by Spectropop - 04 /17/98 - 12:59:24 AM ]---
    
    Subject:     Lesley and TAMI
    Sent:        4/18/98 2:23 AM
    Received:    4/18/98 2:49 AM
    From:        Doc Rock, docroXXX@XXXXXXom
    To:          Spectropop List, spectroXXX@XXXXXXies.com
    
    As for favorite Lesley tracks, my favorite is "You Didn't 
    Look Around," especially the live version from the TAMI 
    Show. It is cut 3 on disk 2 on the 2 CD set.
    
    ---[ archived by Spectropop - 04 /18/98 - 02 :59:24 AM ]---
    
    Subject:     Re: Rodney and the Kessels
    Sent:        4/17/98 12:58 AM
    Received:    4/16/98 6:35 AM
    From:        le_page_XXX@XXXXXXies.com
    To:          Spectropop List, spectroXXX@XXXXXXies.com
    
    Brad wrote:
    
    >Hey, all.  Just got back from a week out of town...
    
    Nice to hear from you, Brad.
    
    >>Kessels made a Rodney single, too. At the time 
    >>everyone was using a makeshift studio...
    >>The Kessel kids cut Rodney's record there.
     
    >I'm assuming the Rodney single you're referring to is 
    >"Little GTO," on which Rodney was backed by the group 
    >Blondie, with The Honeys on backing vocals...
    
    Wow! That brings back memories. Now I recall the single you 
    mentioned and Blondie/Honeys involvement, but the side I was 
    referring to was "Rodney on the ROQ." Now I can't remember 
    whether this was the B-Side to Little GTO or not. 
    
    >1. Have you ever heard the European Bomp/London release that  
    >was credited to "The New York Blondes featuring Madame X"   
    >That release used Deborah Harry's demo lead vocal and got  
    >yanked because it hadn't been okayed by her record company.
    
    I remember Rodney playing the Debbie Harry version on his show, 
    but the Euro Bomp release escapes me. I seem to recall Rodney 
    saying it couldn't be released due to clearance problems.
    
    >2. Are you familiar with...the album "Rodney Bingenheimer 
    >presents All Year Party,  Volume One" (Martian Records LP 
    >1714, released 1984)...a cool record it is -- not just the 
    >two Rodney tracks, but...even "I Got Love" by the Martians 
    >(the Kessel brothers' own group), plus a bunch of never-
    >made-its.  All of the tracks are Kessel Bros. productions!  
    >The fine print on the jacket says that Martian Records was 
    >"A Division of Dan Kessel/David Kessel International."
    
    Somewhere I have the Martians 45, but I don't remember the 
    other side. The album release date is interesting, because 
    most of those tracks are from the late 70's, I believe. By 
    1984, LA was leaning toward the hair band thing with Guns N 
    Roses just starting to make a buzz. That implies the '84 
    album was all the stuff the Kessels had in the can from 
    their Phil bodyguard days during the latter half of the 
    70's, so I guess a lot or most of that album was recorded 
    at the Hollywood Blvd. studio I mentioned. 
    
    I love that "A Division of..." credit, btw. Just like Uncle 
    Phil.
    
    >Even Harvey Kubernik makes an appearance playing percussion 
    >on one track.
    
    There you go! Harvey Kubernik - Now THAT'S nostalgia! I guess 
    a Kessels/Rodney album would have to have Harvey credited for 
    something. :-) I remember a couple of Sunday-before-X'mas 
    Rodney shows at the old KROQ studios in Pasadena. Harvey was 
    there,  David and Dan too, and of course Rodney, spinning 
    obscure Spector sides. Harvey had, if memory serves, Things 
    Are Changing and the Bonnie Jo Mason (Cher) single "Ringo, 
    I Love You." That was the first time I ever heard those 
    sides. I think I had Let's Dance (the Screw) and maybe 
    "Lover's Wonderland" by the Sugar Plums.
    
    Now, a question for you, Brad. Do you agree that Fowley's 
    track off _74/79_ sounds nothing like Phil circa A Woman's 
    Story / Lennon's R&R album, yet has much in common with the 
    production values of Rodney Bingenheimer presents All Year 
    Party,  Volume One?
    
    Sorry for the diversion, all; thanks for the memory jog, Brad.
    
    We now return you to your regularly scheduled decade...
    --
    le_page_XXX@XXXXXXies.com
    RodeoDrive/5030
    
    ---[ archived by Spectropop - 04 /17/98 - 12:59:24 AM ]---
    
    Subject:     Re: Bacharach
    Sent:        4/16/98 12:55 PM
    Received:    4/17/98 12:23 AM
    From:        David Feldman, feldXXX@XXXXXXerables.com
    To:          Spectropop List, spectroXXX@XXXXXXies.com
    
    I speaketh too soon. At the end of the program, Bacharach 
    gave a heartfelt thank-you to Hal David, and mentioned 
    "Alfie" as a great lyric. I have to agree. What I love 
    about David is his directness, his lack of gimmicks, and 
    his economy with words, even with syllables.
    
    Listen to "Walk On By." Is there a word in the lyric that 
    is longer than two syllables? The succession of one-
    syllable words:
    
       "If you see me walking on the street,
        And I start to cry,
        Each time we meet,
        Walk on by..."
    
    give the song its movement, reinforcing the title.  Just 
    brilliant stuff.    
    
    David's credo seems to be: Never use a five-syllable word 
    when a one-syllable word will do. Never use a metaphor 
    when a naked expresion of emotion will do. Great stuff.
    
    Dave Feldman
    
    RIP: Carl Wilson
    CD of the Month:  "The Lateness of the Hour" (Eric Matthews)
    Movie of the Month:  Love & Death on Long Island
    Best Time Killer of the 90's:  Filling out the gender survey at
      "http://www.imponderables.com"
    
    ---[ archived by Spectropop - 04 /17/98 - 12:59:24 AM ]---
    
    Subject:     Re: Covers
    Sent:        4/16/98 3:15 AM
    Received:    4/17/98 12:23 AM
    From:        Doc Rock, docroXXX@XXXXXXom
    To:          Spectropop  List, spectroXXX@XXXXXXies.com
    
    >>I feel that if we use that expanded definition of cover
    >>(recording of a previously recorded song), then Elvis (or
    >>any other artist) who records a song off of a demo record
    >>has made a cover record.
    >------------------------------------------------
    >
    >I disagree.  To me, if the demo record (or tape) was never 
    >commercially released, then the new version isn't a cover.  
    >Virtually any artist who ever recorded a song written by 
    >somebody else did so on the basis of hearing a demo; by your 
    >definition, that means just about every hit ever made was a 
    >cover version -- if the artist didn't write it themselves.
    
    That is not MY definition.  The definition these days is, 
    you remake a song, you cover it. MY definition is the old 
    one:  Recording of a currently popular song is a cover.
    
    But I still see very little difference from calling Gary 
    Lewis 1965 recording  of "Save Your Heart For Me" a cover 
    because it was a Brian Hyland flipside in 1963; and calling 
    "Clambake" a cover if it was done off a PJ Proby demo.
    
    To me, neither of those is a cover.
    
    >Me personally, I think the 1990s definition works, only in 
    >that it's become more widely-accepted:  any new version of  
    >a previously established old hit by another artist.
    
    Except that is not the 90s definition. The 90s definition 
    includes flip side, LP cuts, and like that.
    
    >...is most significant when you have a major hit cover of a  
    >hit done decades ago.  But I think it should only be  
    >applied to new versions of songs that were _commercially  
    >released_.
    
    Commercially released or previously established old hit?
    
    There have been Buddy Holly songs, released after his death 
    and never on the charts, that have been said to have been 
    "covered" by later artists.  And I have heard concert 
    performances that were said to include covers of old songs!
    
    Call me a purist. A cover cannot be made once the original 
    has left the charts!
    
    Doc
    
    ---[ archived by Spectropop - 04 /17/98 - 12:59:24 AM ]---
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