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Spectropop V#0038

  • From: The Spectropop Group
  • Date: 2/5/98

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           Volume #0038                               02/05/98
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                       super fi sound - in stereo
    
    
    
    
    Subject:     Grass Roots Question
    Sent:        2/4/98 2:48 PM
    Received:    2/5/98 1:04 AM
    From:        Richard Globman, rglobXXX@XXXXXXeocomm.net
    
    Jack asked:
    
    > I keep pondering the two-disc Rhino best-of, and the 
    > single-disc MCA  best-of.  Is there any reason to go with 
    > one over the other?  Does the  MCA disc have everything 
    > one would need, or maybe they are re-recordings  or 
    > something weird like that?
    
    Don't know about the Rhino set, but I have the MCA disk.  Three pages of 
    liner notes (you'll need about 47 magnifying glasses to read it, however).
    
    Track lineup is:
     1. Let's Live For Today
     2. Where Wer You When I Needed You
     3. Things I Should Have Said
     4. Midnight Confessions
     5. The River Is Wide
     6. Bella Linda
     7. Lovin' Things
     8. Wait A Million Years
     9. Baby Hold On
    10. Heaven Knows
    11. Come On and Say It
    12. Temptation Eyes
    13. Two Divided by Love
    14. Glory Bound
    15. The Runway
    16. Sooner or Later
    
    Off the top of my pointy little head, I can't think of anything major 
    that is missing.
    
    DICKYG
    
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    Subject:     Re: Grass Roots
    Sent:        2/4/98 8:53 AM
    Received:    2/5/98 1:04 AM
    From:        David Bash, BashXXX@XXXXXXm
    
    << From:        Jack Madani, Jack_MadXXX@XXXXXX2.nj.us
     
     I keep pondering the two-disc Rhino best-of, and the single-disc MCA   
    best-of.  Is there any reason to go with one over the other?  Does the   
    MCA disc have everything one would need, or maybe they are re-recordings  
     or something weird like that? >>
    
    Hi Jack,
    
    Definitely go with the Rhino Collection, for two reasons: 1. The Grass 
    Roots had much more to offer than what is on the MCA disc, certainly 36 
    tracks worth and 2. The sound quality on the Rhino set is infinitely 
    better, and the book that comes with it is interesting and informative.
    
    --
    Spectropop Rules!!!!!
    Take Care,
    David
    
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    Subject:     Re: The Grass Roots
    Sent:        2/4/98 2:30 PM
    Received:    2/5/98 1:04 AM
    From:        Javed Jafri, javedjaXXX@XXXXXX.ca
    
    Jack,
    
    The one re-recording you have to be aware of is the one done for the 
    first Grass Roots single "Where Were You When I Needed You". The original 
    song was done by P.F. Sloan and fellow studio hands. The original concept 
    of the band was very much a Sloan studio project. Once the song became a 
    hit a real group was put together with Robb Grill and co. This new 
    fabricated group became a force to be reckoned with and recorded and 
    released some fine material but they recorded their own vocals over the 
    original track of WWYWINY for an early Greatest Hits comp. I still prefer 
    the cool original.
    
    I have a greatest hits by the group on which recordings originally made 
    by the second and Sloan-less incarnation of the band are re-recorded. I 
    don't recall the label off hand but I was disappointed when I first heard 
    it.
    
    A bit of interesting trivia concerning the name Grass Roots. This was the 
    original name of the group Love (of Forever Changes fame) but they had to 
    drop the name when the Slaon recording started to take off.
    
    Javed
    
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    Subject:     Grassroots/Neo Girl Group Sounds
    Sent:        2/4/98 8:54 AM
    Received:    2/5/98 1:04 AM
    From:        David Marsteller, davebXXX@XXXXXXlin.org
    
    I can't speak on the relative merits of the two sets (I'll keep my vinyl 
    for now), but the MCA recordings ought to be the originals.
    > 
    >  Have there been that many girl-group-sounding recordings 
    > that have   managed to break onto the charts in the past 
    > 15 or 20 years?  There must   be others, but at this 
    > moment all I can think of is Tracey Ullman's "They   Don't 
    > Know," The Pointer Sisters' "He's So Shy" (a particularly 
    > faithful   recreation of that old genre that we love so 
    > well here on Spectropop),   and perhaps Madonna's "True 
    > Blue."
    
    Hmm, I thought Melissa Manchester's "You Should Hear How He Talks About  
    You" was pretty close. Mari Wilson's "Just What I Always Wanted" reminds  
    me of Dusty Springfield, unfortunately that wasn't a U.S. hit (as far as  
    I know). Was Ronnie Spector's "Say Goodbye To Hollywood" mentioned  
    recently on this list? I'm sure there are more songs out there, but they  
    probably didn't make the charts.
    Later
    Dave
    
    /************************************************************************/
    /**   "Reach out and grab a fistful of now"                            **/
    /**                                             Thornetta Davis        **/
    /**      David Marsteller davebXXX@XXXXXXlin.org                       **/
    /************************************************************************/
    
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    Subject:     Beat at Abbey Road
    Sent:        2/3/98 5:44 PM
    Received:    2/4/98 8:08 AM
    From:        Jack Madani, Jack_MadXXX@XXXXXX2.nj.us
    
    Does anyone have any thoughts on this new compilation I've seen, called 
    The Beat at Abbey Road?  
    
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Jack Madani - Princeton Day School, The Great Road,
       Princeton, NJ  08540   Jack_MadXXX@XXXXXX2.nj.us
    "It is when the gods hate a man with uncommon abhorrence that they
     drive him into the profession of a schoolmaster." --Seneca, 64 A.D.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
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    Subject:     Neo-Girl Group Sounds
    Sent:        2/4/98 2:48 PM
    Received:    2/5/98 1:04 AM
    From:        Richard Globman, rglobXXX@XXXXXXeocomm.net
    
    Jack Madani SED:
    
    > Have there been that many girl-group-sounding recordings 
    > that have  managed to break onto the charts in the past 15 
    > or 20 years?  There must  be others, but at this moment 
    > all I can think of is Tracey Ullman's "They  Don't Know," 
    > The Pointer Sisters' "He's So Shy" (a particularly 
    > faithful  recreation of that old genre that we love so 
    > well here on Spectropop),  and perhaps Madonna's "True 
    > Blue."
    
    Oh man....how could you forget the absolutely wonderful "This Is It" by 
    Natalie Cole?  I mean, can't you just hear Martha & The Vandellas all 
    over that?
    
    DICKYG (Nat would have been so proud of her!)
    
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    Subject:     Re:  Spectropop V#0037
    Sent:        2/4/98 11:48 AM
    Received:    2/5/98 1:04 AM
    From:        Ken Williamson, KentXXX@XXXXXXm
    
    In a message dated 3/2/98 3:01:47 pm, you wrote:
    
    >and with the recent promo 4 disc box that's been 
    >circulating around, Bacharach has become a mainstay recently at 
    > the homestead. 
    
    Any idea where one might be able to pick this up?  I've been looking for 
    this for at least the last three years.  Thanks.
    
    --KFW
    
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    Subject:     Re: Bacharach
    Sent:        2/4/98 1:07 PM
    Received:    2/5/98 1:04 AM
    From:        Paul MacArthur, rtf_XXX@XXXXXXdu
    
    Re: Bacharach
    
    >>...Varese has a Bacharach songbook due out Feb 24th.
    >>Does anyone have a track list.
    
    McCoy Tyner did a very good tribute to Bacharach that came out this 
    summer.
    
    It's called WHAT THE WORLD NEEDS NOW...THE MUSIC OF BURT BACHARACH.
    
    Lots of strings on it, but the arrangements by John Clayton are pretty 
    good and Tyner is of course a great soloist.
    
    - Paul
    
    ----------
    
    Album of the Week: Stanley Clarke JOURNEY TO LOVE
    
    Song of the Week: Vanilla Fudge "You Keep Me Hangin' On"
    
    Q: How do you get a guitarist to stop playing?
    A: Put some sheet music in front of him.
    
    ----------
    
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    Subject:     Girls! Girls! Girls!
    Sent:        2/4/98 8:26 AM
    Received:    2/5/98 1:04 AM
    From:        le_page_XXX@XXXXXXies.com
    
    Jack Madani wrote:
    
    >Have there been that many girl-group-sounding recordings 
    >that have managed to break onto the charts in the past 15 or 20 >years?  
    
    No, there haven't, and it's interesting that the genre seems to be locked 
    into the early sixties, up to around when JFK was offed. After the GG 
    sound faded, there were few GG sounding discs. Even when there is a 
    reference, it is usually parody, as in "Homecoming Queen's Got a Gun" by 
    Julie somebody (I forget, but I can still name all three of the 
    Ronettes!) Sure there is the occasional cover, like Mariah Carey's 
    Christmas (Baby Please Come Home) or Celine Dion's River Deep, but these 
    *sound* little like GG records. If you think about it, more male artists 
    make GG-sounding records than do female artists. 
    
    It may be the lyrics. Lesley Gore sang "Maybe I know that he's been 
    ,cheating maybe I know that he's been untrue, but what can I do" while 
    Brian sang "It'd be another story if she looked at the guys." The typical 
    GG record was about giving one's "heart" away and the fear of being 
    rejected. Of course there is the occasional exception like Glenda 
    Collins' "It's Hard To Believe It" (a bizarre lyric but arguably Joe 
    Meek's finest record ever). 
    
    One cover that comes to mind is Dolly Parton et al doing Mr. Sandman. 
    Even that was a novelty, though, and besides, Chordettes were really 
    pre-GG; more like a female barbershop vocal group. Great stuff, though. 
    Archie Bleyer was a visionary.
    
    >Heaven knows I love Spector, but there's plenty to recommend 
    >that other school of production, that "east coast sound," I guess 
    >you'd call it.
    
    Yes, there are plenty of East Coast records worth recommending. 
    
    New York records tend to be disciplined and feature a small ensemble with 
    an emphasis on jazzy R&B-ish shuffle. West Coast records are typically 
    wild, big and reverby, many with a strong eight beat rock feel. I think a 
    big reason for the difference in sound is the difference in the nature of 
    the entertainment businesses on each coast; East being Broadway, West 
    being film and TV. Now where do the Brit GG records by Tony Hatch, Ivor 
    Raymonde etc. fit in to this theory?
    
    East Coast/West Coast...Don't forget the Motor City!
    
    LePageWeb
    
    
    
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