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Spectropop V#0032

  • From: The Spectropop Group
  • Date: 1/25/98

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            Volume #0032                               01/25/98
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                   PLAYABLE ON STEREO & MONO PHONOGRAPHS 
    
    
    
    
    Subject:     the most popular boy
    Sent:        1/18/98 8:42 PM
    Received:    1/25/98 9:20 PM
    From:        Jack Madani, Jack_MadXXX@XXXXXX2.nj.us
    
    It's great to have the list back!  Much of what I picked
    up over the break was music from outside of our chosen
    area here, but I certainly spent time digging around 
    for stuff.  One thing I have had no luck finding, if
    anyone can help me get a line on it, I'd be grateful: 
    I've been looking for "Here Come The Girls Volume 1," on
    Sequel Records from the UK.  I believe its catalog
    number is SEQ NEX 111.2.  This is NOT the volume that's
    subtitled "You can be wrong about boys," which is in
    fact volume 4 in the series but was issued here in the
    US and given the number "volume 1" as some cruel way of
    messing with our heads.  No, the one I want has no
    subtitle.  The one I want has "That's How It Goes" as
    the very first song.  O please, I hope someone can help
    me.  (BTW, I'm looking for a cd copy of this disc)
    
    Now to the pernt of my post:  Which boy has had the most
    songs sung to or about him:  Bobby, Jimmy, or Johnny?
    
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    Jack Madani - Princeton Day School, The Great Road,
       Princeton, NJ  08540   Jack_MadXXX@XXXXXX2.nj.us
    "It is when the gods hate a man with uncommon abhorrence that they
     drive him into the profession of a schoolmaster." --Seneca, 64 A.D.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    Archived by Spectropop
    
    Subject:     Re: Johnny Angel
    Sent:        1/22/98 12:59 AM
    Received:    1/25/98 9:20 PM
    From:        Doc Rock, docroXXX@XXXXXXom
    
    I need help, opinions, or better yet, some authoritative
    information.
    
    It is in regard to the song "Johnny Angel."  In liner
    notes, it is often stated that Darlene Love and the
    blossoms sang background on Shelly Fabares hit version. 
    I've been told that Darlene says the same on stage. And
    I've heard that Shelly herself says that.
    
    But when I interviewed Fanita of the Blossoms, she
    laughed at that claim. She says that the Blossoms did not
    sing on "Johnny Angel."
    
    Further, when I interviewed Lou Adler (record producer
    and Shelly's ex), he said that it was not the Blossoms,
    but session singer Sally Stevens and  her group that sang
    on Johnny Angel.  He said that Sally and a group of her
    friends ranging in number from two to four sang on all of
    the records of Shelly, Paul Peterson, and James Darren. 
    He said that Sally also sang on a few Jan & Dean sessions
    for Dore.
    
    When I listen to "Johnny Angel," I do not hear the
    Blossoms.  Does anyone else hear the Blossoms?
    
    They were very versatile and sang backup on many records
    in different styles.  Still....
    
    I don't suppose anyone has first hand knowledge, or
    access to the Union files showing who worked on specific
    sessions and song?
    
    Doc
    
    Archived by Spectropop
    
    Subject:     Re: *Spectropop 1998*
    Sent:        1/21/98 11:25 AM
    Received:    1/25/98 9:20 PM
    From:        CLimmer, CLimXXX@XXXXXXm
    
    
    > To help get things off to a good start, perhaps listers
    > would like to share any new finds or rediscoveries from
    > the recent holiday season.
    
    Let me take a moment to rhapsodize over the Simon &
    Garfunkel compilation, _Old Friends_.  If you've ever
    cared at all about S&G, folk-rock, or two-part harmonies,
    you *must* own this.  Wonderful vocal performances,
    timeless songs--notwithstanding Paul's sometimes
    sophomoric lyrics--and, finally, jaw- dropping sound
    quality. (Yeah, the liner notes are no great shakes.  If
    you wanna read, buy a book.)  
    
    On a related note, I recently picked up a bargain bin
    copy of Garfunkel's '96 release, _Across America_, which
    includes Art's solo versions of several S&G classics. 
    It's nothing short of remarkable how intact his vocal
    range has remained, over thirty years later.  Worth
    hearing for his lovely rendition of "Scarborough Fair,"
    alone.
    
    Chuck Limmer
    
    Archived by Spectropop
    
    Subject:     Re: Psychedelic Rock
    Sent:        1/17/98 5:16 AM
    Received:    1/25/98 9:20 PM
    From:        BashPop, BashXXX@XXXXXXm
    
    > Subject:     Psychedelic Rock
    > 
    >  Recently, Madani spoke of the Flowerpotmen who are from
    > this same 1967 -- 68 time frame and are also currently
    > blowing my mind (I must admit that the flawless 5 minute
    > classic, Beach Baby is a very guilty pleasure of mine!).
    > Also, obviously I worship the Love classic, Forever
    > Changes (more pre-Byrds stuff) -- and even the first side
    > of De Capo.    Now, I'm asking the members of this list
    > to help me to find more of this magical music from this,
    > the Golden Age of psychedelic rock and roll. What other
    > LPs (CDs) belong alongside these beautiful works?    
    > Dave Mirich
    
    Hi Dave,
    
    Well, while the term "psychedelic rock" is generally used
    to describe 60s music with a lot of distortion and guitar
    and extended guitar and keyboard solos, if you consider
    things like Flowerpot Men to be in that category, I have
    many wonderful recommendations for you:
    
    Among the albums you ought to look for are:
    
    Colours-Colours
    Around Grapefruit-Grapefruit
    So Good-Don And The Goodtimes
    The Clique-The Clique
    Elephant Candy-The Fun and Games
    The Robbs-The Robbs
    Eternity's Children-Eternity's Children
    Down To Middle Earth-The Hobbits
    Blew Mind-The Hard Times
    
    There are plenty more where that came from, but start
    with those and see if you're happy.  All of them are out
    of print, but you can find them at collectors shops, swap
    meets, etc...Many of these are along the lines of soft-
    ish psych pop, and I think you'd love em!
    
    And, if you're a fan of Carter/Lewis, pick up the new Ivy
    League 2 CD reissue on Sequel.
    
    --
    Spectropop Rules!!!!!
    Take Care,
    David
    
    Archived by Spectropop
    
    Subject:     Re: Psychedelic Rock
    Sent:        1/18/98 2:20 PM
    Received:    1/25/98 9:20 PM
    From:        Javed Jafri, javedjaXXX@XXXXXX.ca
    
    >From:        D mirich, DmirXXX@XXXXXXm 
    > Now, I'm asking the members of this list to help me to 
    > find more of this magical music from this, the Golden Age 
    > of psychedelic rock and roll. What other LPs (CDs) belong 
    > alongside these beautiful works?
    
    David,
    
    One record that I recommend is by a group called Gandalf.
    Their one and only album came out on Capitol and it was
    eponymously titled. It's very hard to find and I don't
    know if it's ever been released on CD. Very little is
    known about the band and I'm not even sure what city
    they were form. I know they were American.  Their music
    could be categorized as psyche-pop and the album was
    produced by Koppelman and Rubin who were also
    responsible for the production of the Lovin' Spoonful
    and Sopwith Camel. The sound on the album however is
    closer to the Zombies and British psyche-pop. 
    
    I can't really describe the sound of this wonderful
    album, it's haunting at times with a definite
    psychedelic edge yet it is very hummable. They cover a
    couple of Tim Hardin songs including a killer version of
    Hang On to a Dream. The record also has covers of Bing
    Crosby's Golden Earrings and Harry Belafonte's Scarlett
    Ribbons. These sound nothing like the originals. The
    original material on the record is also first rate. I'm
    very surprised that the record has not become better
    known and that none of the group members rose to more
    prominence.
    
    If anyone on this list has more information about this
    wonderful group it would be appreciated.
    
    Javed
    
    Archived by Spectropop
    
    Subject:     Re: Psychedelic Rock
    Sent:        1/17/98 5:38 AM
    Received:    1/25/98 9:20 PM
    From:        Jeff Glenn, Jeff_GlXXX@XXXXXX.nba.TRW.COM
    
    > Now, I'm asking the members of this list to help me to
    > find more of this magical music from this, the Golden Age
    > of psychedelic rock and roll. What other LPs (CDs) belong
    > alongside these beautiful works?
    > 
    > BTW, thanks Jack before recommending the Andrew Gold
    > records.  I always hated the song Thank You for Being a
    > Friend (my local TV news station used it as their jingle
    > and burned it to the ground!  I didn't even know who
    > wrote this song but I wanted to see him to pilloried in
    > the town's square!) However, it turns out of the this
    > Brian-O-Phile is very talented and has a catalog of
    > highly listenable music.
    
    Dave, there was a terrific CD released last year that
    combined the two above elements: GREETINGS FROM PLANET
    LOVE by The Fraternal Order of the All.  This is
    essentially Andrew Gold (with some help from a few
    friends) making a psychedelic album that cops various
    groups styles in different songs (much like the Dukes of
    Stratosphear/XTC stuff).  There are great pastiches of
    the Beach Boys, the Beatles, the Doors, etc. and a song
    that sounds so much like the Byrds that you could play it
    for a Byrds fanatic and convince them it was a long lost
    outtake.  Great CD!
    
    Other bands from the 60's you should try are The Parade
    and The Merry-Go-Round.  The Parade's unreleased LP from
    the 60's was issued on CD in Japan on A&M; The
    Merry-Go-Round's one LP is also available on CD from
    Japan A&M (Emitt Rhodes, who produced a demo my band made
    of covers that we use to secure gigs) didn't even know it
    had been reissued in Japan (heck of a nice guy, and very
    down to earth).
    
    And let me second Scott's recommendation on the Move set
    MOVEMENTS and add that this might be the first time this
    material has ever been mastered from the first generation
    tapes, as the sound is superb (especially "Lightning
    Never Strikes Twice")!
    
    And another plug for ZOMBIE HEAVEN; great pop, great
    sound (thank you for the mono mixes of the Decca stuff!),
    great booklet.  The other best box to come out in 1996
    (the other is of course THE PET SOUNDS SESSIONS).
    
    I'm looking forward to receiving the first set of Sea of
    Tunes CD's; in fact I have to go to the Post Office now
    to mail off the money order.
    
    Jeffrey Glenn
    
    Archived by Spectropop
    
    Subject:     Re: Psychedelic Rock
    Sent:        1/22/98 8:53 AM
    Received:    1/25/98 9:20 PM
    From:        Big L, biXXX@XXXXXXmail.com
    
    >>Now, I'm asking the members of this list to help me
    to find more of this magical music from this, the
    Golden Age of psychedelic rock and roll. What other
    LPs (CDs) belong alongside these beautiful works?
    
    I don't think it rates up there with those works, but
    I really enjoy "A Scratch In The Sky" by the Cryan'
    Shames.
    
    >>BTW, thanks Jack before recommending the Andrew
    Gold records.  I always hated the song Thank You for
    Being a Friend (my local TV news station
    used it as their jingle and burned it to the ground! 
    I didn't even know who wrote this song but I wanted
    to see him to pilloried in the town's square!) 
    
    I also hated "What A Lonely Boy" by Gold - just goes
    to show that what becomes a hit may not be indicative
    of the artist's catalog. By those two songs, you'd
    think Gold was a Leo Sayer clone.
    
    
    ==
    Big L  
    
    
    Archived by Spectropop
    
    Subject:     Re: Spectropop V#0031
    Sent:        1/17/98 12:52 PM
    Received:    1/25/98 9:20 PM
    From:        GBMGIDEON, GBMGIDXXX@XXXXXXm
    
    Welcome back.
    
    I really missed the postings.
    
    I am listening right now to Julie Plug's STARMAKER cd.  If you like the
    Sundays or the Darling Buds, you should give this cd a listen.
    
    John King
    gbmgidXXX@XXXXXXm
    
    Archived by Spectropop
    
    
    Subject:     THE CAKE
    Sent:        1/17/98 6:15 AM
    Received:    1/25/98 9:20 PM
    From:        Doc Rock, docroXXX@XXXXXXom
    
    I have 2 LPs by the Cake.  They are truly great.
    
    Archived by Spectropop
    
    Subject:     Re: Spectropop V#0031
    Sent:        1/22/98 9:37 PM
    Received:    1/25/98 9:20 PM
    From:        Jeff Glenn, Jeff_GlXXX@XXXXXX.nba.TRW.COM
    
    Hi all!
    
    A quick heads up on two discs that I picked up the other
    day:
    
    1. 60'S GIRL GROUPS (Various Artists): A terrific
    17-track comp of 1962-1968 girl group tracks from Warner
    Bros, Reprise, and Loma Records.  Any CD that leads off
    with the Blossoms' "That's When The Tears Start" and ends
    with the Honeys' "He's A Doll" has got to be great!  And
    in between you get rare and obscure gems from the likes
    of the Apollas, the Royalettes (pre-MGM), the Three
    Degrees, the Dolls, the Cookies (a great post-Dimension
    track!), Sugar & Spice, the Pearls, the Chiffons
    (pre-Laurie), and the Revlons, as well as two more
    Blossoms' tracks.
    
    2. THE ALL-TIME GREATEST HITS OF ROY ORBISON (DCC 24K
    Gold Disc):  You probably think you've heard these all
    before (same track listing as the CBS version of this
    disc), but you're wrong!  Steve Hoffman has done an
    INCREDIBLE job on this stuff - as good as or better than
    his Buddy Holly work back in the 80's.  A bit hissy too,
    so you know he didn't screw with the sound.  All mastered
    from the original 2-track masters (the mixes were done
    live to 2-track during the sessions while monitoring in
    mono, meaning the mono 45 mixes can be duplicated by
    simply pressing the mono switch on your amp or receiver).
    And there are great liner notes by original engineer Bill
    Porter with lots of great anecdotes about the sessions! 
    Simply BREATHTAKING!!  Sorry to gush, but this disc is
    that good.
    
    That's enough for now.  Have a great day, everyone.
    
    Jeff
    
    Archived by Spectropop
    
    Subject:     Babe I Need Your Love
    Sent:        1/17/98 5:21 AM
    Received:    1/25/98 9:20 PM
    From:        John Barone, beachbXXX@XXXXXXmail.com
    
    Dan I believe the original version is by KC and the
    Sunshine Band, I think the correct title is Please
    Don't Go.
    
    JohnBarone
    
    
    Archived by Spectropop
    
    Subject:     Weekend In Palm Springs
    Sent:        1/20/98 10:56 PM
    Received:    1/25/98 9:20 PM
    From:        Jack Madani, Jack_MadXXX@XXXXXX2.nj.us
    
    Recently watched this movie that was shown on American
    Movie Classics (AMC).  Hilariously typical early-sixties
    teen flick, sort of an American International beach movie
    only with a bigger budget (it was from Warner Brothers). 
    Starring Troy Donahue, Connie Stevens, Stephanie Powers,
    Jerry Van Dyke, Robert Conrad, and a bunch of other
    recognizable faces.  And at the nightclub on stage who
    was performing but.....
    
    .....The Modern Folk Quartet! 
    
    They were like a Kingston Trio or a Chad Mitchell Trio. 
    Reeeeeeel folky. Not at ALL like what they sounded like
    on their Spector hit "this could be the night."
    
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Jack Madani - Princeton Day School, The Great Road,
       Princeton, NJ  08540   Jack_MadXXX@XXXXXX2.nj.us
    "It is when the gods hate a man with uncommon abhorrence that they
     drive him into the profession of a schoolmaster." --Seneca, 64 A.D.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------
    
    Archived by Spectropop
    End
    
    

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