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Spectropop V#0183

  • From: The Spectropop Group
  • Date: 11/11/98

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       Volume #0183                       November 11, 1998   
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                  Surpassing the State of the Art             
    
    
    
    
    
    
    Subject:     Re: mono
    Sent:        11/11/98 2:24 am
    Received:    11/11/98 7:48 am
    From:        dave prokopy, proXXXXXXXXst.net
    
    
    Trucker Toby, MUV9XXXXXXXXent2.lu.se writes:
    
    > I've read many times that people like Phil Spector and Brian 
    > Wilson preferred mono cos they could (paraphrasing) "control the 
    > listening experience" and I've always wondered what that means 
    > exactly!! Is it because they could blend instruments together in a
    > way which made them unseparable from eachother, creating one big 
    > noise/sound as opposed to a stereo mix where everything is spread 
    > out...??
    
    that's prety much exactly what it means. with stereo - especially 
    the kind of "hard" stereo mixing that was done in the sixties 
    (with instruments very distinctly mixed left, center, or right) - 
    it IS rather easy to affect the sound by simply turning the 
    "balance" control on your hi-fi, or sitting closer to one speaker 
    than the other.
    
    granted, you still CAN change the sound with mono, through EQ, or 
    depending on what kind of speakers you have. but, generally 
    speaking, the balance of instruments and vocals can't be changed 
    too much.
    
    brian had other reasons for mixing in mono, not the least of which
    was that he was mostly deaf in one ear. plus, like spector, brian 
    knew his target audience - teens who primarily heard his music on 
    AM radio and cheap record players. so he mixed his records to 
    sound best in those contexts.
    
    
    --------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------
    
    
    Subject:     Re: Mono
    Sent:        11/11/98 4:04 am
    Received:    11/11/98 7:48 am
    From:        Marc Wielage,XXXXXXXXctrax.com
    
    
    
    Trucker Toby <MUV9XXXXXXXXent2.lu.se> asked on the Spectropop List:
    
    >I've read many times that people like Phil Spector and Brian
    >Wilson preferred mono cos they could (paraphrasing) "control the
    >listening experience" and I've always wondered what that means
    >exactly!! Is it because they could blend instruments together in a
    >way which made them unseparable from eachother, creating one big
    >noise/sound as opposed to a stereo mix where everything is spread
    >out...??
    -------------------<snip>-------------------
    
    The explanation is simple:
    
    in stereo, if you change your listening position, you'll emphasize
    the sounds coming from one speaker over the sounds coming from the 
    other. That totally changes the balance of the recording.
    
    However, if you're listening to Mono, you have the same sounds 
    coming out of each speaker. No matter where you sit in the room, 
    the balance will more-or-less sound the same. That way, the 
    overall mix between vocals and instruments, or lead vocal and 
    background vocals, will remain consistent.
    
    When listeners have access to stereo recordings, or multi-channel 
    recordings (like Dolby Surround or DTS), you invariably run into 
    situations where the listener might wind up hearing a very 
    different mix, with radically different balances. With luck, it 
    might sound close to what the engineers and producer(s) intended 
    for you to hear, but there's much less of a risk of problems with 
    mono.
    
    
    --MFW
    
    
    --------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------
    
    
    Subject:     Mono
    Sent:        11/11/98 8:22 am
    Received:    11/12/98 6:53 am
    From:        Doc Rock, docrXXXXXXXX.com
    
    
    
    >I've read many times that people like Phil Spector and Brian 
    >Wilson preferred mono cos they could (paraphrasing) "control the 
    >listening experience" and I've always wondered what that means 
    >exactly!! Is it because they could blend instruments together in a
    >way which made them unseparable from eachother, creating one big 
    
    
    Jan preferred mono. On most cuts (except things like Pop Symphony 
    and Drag City), so did Dean.
    
    Why? To preserve the mix, as well as to cover up errors (flat 
    notes!).
    
    And there were other reasons.
    
    For example, Jan mixed "Dead Man's Curve" with the vocal buried in
    the mix. He did that so that the listener would have to turn the 
    song up loud to try to hear the lyrics. That's because DMC sounds 
    best at a high volume.
    
    Doc
    
    
    --------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------
    
    
    Subject:     Re: Spectropop V#0182
    Sent:        11/11/98 3:15 am
    Received:    11/11/98 7:48 am
    From:        Barbara Alston, BARBXXXXXXXXcom
    
    
    Jimmy, you may be young but you have great insight and 
    understanding. It makes me feel wonderful to know that someone so 
    young can comprehend how we felt in those magical days. My 
    feelings might not appeal to everyone, but they are true and 
    honest. If someone had asked me in the 60's what I felt about that
    record, I fear my answer might have been somewhat shaded by the 
    times and politically incorrect. Thank you so much for your 
    comforting comments.
    
    You also seem to have a feel for how entertainers coexisted in 
    those days. We were truly a group of our own. Race relations were 
    never a problem to speak of in the entertainment world. We got 
    along so well that it was like living in two completely different 
    worlds. We couldn't understand how the outside world could be so 
    hateful to each other but treated entertainers with dignity and 
    respect (most of the time, that is). I imagine it is the same way 
    in the sports world. It just goes to show you that people can get 
    along very well if they want to. I remember those Dick Clark tours
    going through the southern states and not being able to order food 
    from certain eating establishments, not being able to get a room 
    in certain hotels/motels and so forth because of being Black. Dick
    Clark, bless his soul, would end up taking his whole tour to places
    where we could all eat or sleep, and most of the times they were 
    places "across the tracks." Sometimes, however, we could not all 
    get the same accommodations and had to split up due to our group 
    size. But, basically, we had the "one for all and all for one" 
    mentality. I would say today that entertainers and sports figures 
    have had a lot of positive effect on race relations as a whole.
    
    I also remember we had a section in Brooklyn (Bensonhurst) where 
    Black people couldn't even live in those days. And this is not 
    even in the South. So being a rebel was, as you said, strictly a 
    group of nonconforming Whites, no matter where they came from or 
    where they lived. Accordingly, we felt no kinship whatsoever with 
    that tune. It was entirely Phil's trip! And I would love to see 
    him trip over that big R right now :-) ...heeheehee! As you can 
    imagine, I have no love lost for Phil Spector either! But then 
    that's a horse of another color I must say!
    
    Thank you again and it was truly wonderful hearing your comments.
    
    Babs
    
    
    --------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------
    
    
    Subject:     Darlene Love
    Sent:        11/11/98 11:25 am
    Received:    11/12/98 6:53 am
    From:        john rausch, XXXXXXXX.net
    
    
    Hi Everyone, Just heard Darlene on my local oldies station doing a
    telephone interview and seems she has a pretty big spread in the
    latest (December?) ish of People mag. Anyone interested might like 
    to pick up a copy!
    Jonr
    
    
    --------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------
    
    
    Subject:     BOUNCE spectrXXXXXXXXities.com: Non-member su
    Sent:        11/12/98 2:41 am
    Received:    11/12/98 6:53 am
    
    
    ========== Start of forwarded message ==============
    
    
    *** Supreme Court rules in favor of Kingsmen
    
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Supreme Court gave the Kingsmen rock 'n'
    roll band a victory Monday in its battle to get paid for its 
    1963 hit song "Louie Louie." The band's five members signed a 
    contract in 1968 giving them 9% of future licensing fees and 
    profits from the record. The band sued Gusto Records and GML Inc.,
    the record companies that hold the recording rights, in 1993, 
    complaining it never received any royalties due. A federal judge 
    in California and a U.S. appeals court rescinded the contract and 
    granted the musicians the right to all royalties from the time 
    they brought the lawsuit. Attorneys for the record companies 
    appealed to the Supreme Court, but the court sided with the band, 
    rejecting the appeal without comment or dissent. See
    http://www.infobeat.com/stories/cgi/story.cgi?id=2557021286-652
    
    
    
    --------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------
    
    
    Subject:     Burt 'n Eva
    Sent:        11/11/98 11:03 am
    Received:    11/12/98 6:53 am
    From:        Jeffrey Thames, KingoGXXXXXXXXcom
    
    
    >From Marc's list of Burt Bacharach's biggest Billboard successes:
    
    > #1 (1 wk.) Maxi Priest - "Close to You"   (Charisma 98951)  [6/30/90]
    
    I'm sure most of you've caught this by now, but this is a 
    different song from the B&D "they-long-to-be" classic immortalized
    by Karen and Richard. I believe this "Close To You" (one of my 
    favorite #1's of the early 90's) was written by Maxi himself, 
    although I don't have that info in front of me at present.
    
    Will mentioned Little Eva's complete Dimension anthology, which 
    features "Makin' [It] With The Magilla". I gotta know: is this the
    same song (or the same recording, for that matter) used in the 
    Magilla Gorilla cartoon of the same name? I remember taping that 
    song from the TV when I was a kid (using my old hand-held...this 
    was a little before the age of the VCR) and listening to it for 
    weeks afterwards. And to think it was actually released! So is 
    this a new comp, and if not, is it still readily available?
    
    Thanx!
    
    Jeff
    
    --------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------
    
    
    Subject:     Burt Bacharach Hits
    Sent:        11/11/98 6:11 am
    Received:    11/11/98 7:48 am
    From:        David Feldman, felXXXXXXXXnderables.com
    
    
    Marc listed Burt Bacharach's greatest hits, including...--
    
    >  #1 (1 wk.) Maxi Priest - "Close to You"   (Charisma 98951)  [6/30/90]
    
    A great song, but not the Burt song made famous by the Carpenters.
    Dave Feldman
    
    Candy of the Fortnight:  Atomic Fireballs
    CD of the Week: The Look of Love:  The Burt Bacharach Collection
    Word of the Week:  Edgy
    Best Time Killer of the 90's:  Filling out the UPDATED gender survey at
      "http://www.imponderables.com"
    
    
    --------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------
    
    
    Subject:     Re: Bacharach's biggest hits
    Sent:        11/11/98 2:02 pm
    Received:    11/12/98 6:53 am
    From:        Frank Youngwerth, FXXXXXXXXcom
    
    
    << #1 (1 wk.) Maxi Priest - "Close to You"   (Charisma 98951)  [6/30/90]>>
    While some of Maxi Priest's hits were remakes, this "Close to You"
    isn't the Bacharach-David song that the Carpenters recorded, but a 
    different song with the same name. 
    
    
    --------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------
    
    
    Subject:     Re: Maxi Priest (alleged Bacharach content)
    Sent:        11/12/98 2:01 am
    Received:    11/12/98 6:53 am
    From:        Engelbert Humperdinck, MUV9XXXXXXXXent2.lu.se
    
    
    Marc wrote (or maybe quoted from another source):
    
    >I show that as Burt's sixth-biggest chart success ever, out of 129
    >that made the BILLBOARD charts. Here's the Top 10:
    
    [SNIP]
    
    >#1 (1 wk.) Maxi Priest - "Close to You"   (Charisma 98951)  [6/30/90]
    
    This was DEFINITELY NOT written by Burt Bacharach!!! :)
    
    Close To You by Maxi Priest is watered down reggae at its worst 
    (makes Inner Circle's theme to Cops sound like Lee "Scratch" Perry 
    in comparison! :-D), it was a huge hit when I was about 13.....in 
    1990, that is.
    
    We now return to soft rock, girlpop groups and if Mike
    Love will ever get his hair back.
    
    Tobias
    
    
    --------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]--------------------
    End
    
    

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