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Spectropop V#0014

  • From: The Spectropop Group
  • Date: 11/14/97

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           Volume #0014                                 11/15/97
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    Subject:     Re: Spectropop V#0013 - Oldies Radio
    Sent:        11/14/97 3:52 AM
    Received:    11/14/97 11:03 AM
    From:        Kit Carson, XXX@XXXXXXday.com
    To:          Spectropop List, spectroXXX@XXXXXXies.com
    
    
    >1. Oldies radio is more concerned with product than emotions.
    
    Bright Oldies programmers know emotion drives the format. Our product 
    *is* emotion.
    
    >2. Oldies radio is more concerned with money than anything.
    
    That's not fair at all. I'm sure you have a job, too. We have 
    multi-million dollar facilities in our charge, and we certainly are 
    expected to maintain sufficient ratings to sell ads to keep them on the 
    air. No ratings--no ad sales--no profit--no music. But the "they're only 
    interested in the money" slam is unfair to those of us who work hard at 
    what we do and the thousands of people who listen to us.
    
    > ...3. Most people in their 40s and 50s want the nostalgia 
    > limited to gentle  prods. They look upon their younger days 
    > with some embarrassment. They  seem to want to remember only 
    > what they can relate to in the present.  Listening to "Jumpin' 
    > Jack Flash" reminds them that they did things in  their youth 
    > that they are not comfortable with now.
    
    Actually, looking back on misspent youth is a guilty pleasure for a lot 
    of folks.  :-)
    
    > Take "Walkin' In The Sand." For the most part, a poignant song 
    > that  brings back only good memories. Contrast that with "I 
    > Can Never Go Home  Anymore." A similar record, maybe better - 
    > but brings back memories of  conflicts with parents, maybe 
    > even the time you ran away. Not warm, fuzzy  feelings for most 
    > folks. They don't want to be reminded. That's why  you'll 
    > never hear ICNGHA on your typical oldies station.
    
    Yeah, you're right.
    
    > ...4. Oldies radio serves, in most cases, as background music 
    > in the car or  office.
    > 
    Oldies listeners are more active than most formats. Depends on 
    the station, really.
    > 
    > 5. Oldies stations have continually narrowed their playlists 
    > until many  are only playing a few hundred records.
    
    Most Oldies stations have a basic, day-in-day-out library of 450-550 
    records. That's about twice the library size of a CHR (Top 40) station, 
    and a little less than a narrow Classic Rocker. But mature Oldies 
    stations usually have a discretionary library of hundreds more titles 
    used for requests and special features. This is the case on my station 
    and all the "good" Oldies stations you cite.
    
    > There are exceptions. WCBS-FM in New York is probably the best 
    > oldies  only station in the country - and they've been around 
    > long enough to  celebrate THEIR 25th anniversary. I also like 
    > WMJI in Cleveland, and WGRR  in Cincinnati.
    
    WCBS's own research shows that it's the personalities--not the 
    music--that makes their station stand out. I agree that WGRR is a 
    terrific station--and on the internet!
    
    > So, taking the "product" approach, playing only records that 
    > originally  were Top 10, you're not going to get much in the 
    > way of the more esoteric  records, that may have been 
    > wonderful, but weren't big hits in their  time. And, really - 
    > how can you argue with the concept? If a record  wasn't even a 
    > hit during it's first run, there must have been a reason.
    
    People don't tire of records they love. They *do* tire of records they 
    don't know or don't like.
    
    > BTW, I'd like to list a few songs that I loved, even though 
    > they weren't  hits:...
    
    I've got a bunch of my own, and most are Stax.
    
    Just call me Mr. Pitiful,
    
    Kit Carson
    Hear us on RealAudio at http://cool107.com
    
         -----------[ archived by Spectropop ]-----------
    
    Subject:     backhanded compliment songs/oldies radio/stereo _PS_ mix
    Sent:        11/14/97 3:30 AM
    Received:    11/14/97 4:16 AM
    From:        dave prokopy, prokXXX@XXXXXX.net
    To:          Spectropop List, spectroXXX@XXXXXXies.com
    
    how about "she's just my style" by gary lewis and the playboys?  "other 
    guys who see her may not think she's much to see."  ouch!!
    
    Big L, bXXX@XXXXXXt writes about oldies stations:
    
    > 5. Oldies stations have continually narrowed their playlists until many 
    > are only playing a few hundred records.
    
    that's certainly true of the new oldies station here in indianapolis.  
    there was already an oldies station out of a town just outside of indy, 
    that was pretty good.  they played a surprisingly wide range of stuff.  
    then this new station came along, and i was impressed at first.  but 
    lately, they seem to have settled into the same handful of standard 
    motown/beatles/beach boys tracks.  even the more "obscure" tracks they 
    play, they end up playing OVER and OVER again.  (my mind's in a million 
    places, so i can't cite specific examples off the top of my head, sorry.) 
     the DJ's are relatively okay, although at times they make some 
    incredibly boneheaded comments.
    
    Big L also adds:
    
    > ...[the stereo remix of "IJWMFTT"] went beyond "remixing" and 
    > "remastering:"  it is rerecording, something that should never 
    > be done.
    
    okay, i'm none too happy with the remix of this song, for reasons i 
    mentioned on the BB list, but i don't see where there was any 
    "rerecording" done.  what exactly are you referring to here?
    
         -----------[ archived by Spectropop ]-----------
    
    Subject:     Darian and Domenic - Back To Stereo
    Sent:        11/15/97 4:39 AM
    Received:    11/15/97 4:40 AM
    From:        Jamie LePage, XXX@XXXXXXies.com
    To:          Spectropop List, spectroXXX@XXXXXXies.com
    
    Darian Sahanaja , monsaXXX@XXXXXXink.net wrote:
    
    > Zekley has a slew of great records under his  sleeve. You 
    > should check out the great article/discography that Domenic  
    > Priore did (okay, I helped a little) in his Dumb Angel Gazette 
    > Vol. 3.
    
    Oh. That's interesting. So why oh why am I the last one to know?  :-)
    
    More importantly, where can I check it out? When did you and Domenic do 
    this? I know of the Gazette, but the only issue I have is Look Listen 
    Smile Vibrate.
    
    ==========================================
    
    Back To Stereo
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
    
    The WB release of Phil Spector's Greatest Hits has a very strange version 
    of Darlene Love's He's Sure the Boy I Love. It seems to be the original 
    vocal with a second lead vocal on top featuring some wo-wo's and ya-ya's 
    in the intro that were not on the Philles 45. To my knowledge that was 
    the only release of that version. Anyone know anything about this?
    
    LePageWeb 
    
         -----------[ archived by Spectropop ]-----------
    
    Subject:     Gary Zekley
    Sent:        11/14/97 3:10 AM
    Received:    11/14/97 3:51 AM
    From:        carol knudson, knudXXX@XXXXXXolumbia.edu
    To:          Spectropop List, spectroXXX@XXXXXXies.com
    
    
    Hey all,
    
    WOW!, thanks for all the replies on Gary Zekley!! I knew you guys would 
    have the scoop on him.  Now I have so much more I have to look for,  too. 
    This list is great!
    
     Aside from the seemingly quite thorough list of Gary Zekley tunes he was 
    so kind to take the time to type out for us,
    
      Jamie LePage also wrote:
    > 
    >  But Carol, where did you find this?
    > 
    Well, I'll tell ya'- though I had wanted to keep it a secret- I found  
    most of my Gary Zekley songs on the "US Soft Pop Rarities" compilation.  
    A GREAT Japanese CD that I picked up while visiting a good friend, with 
    similar taste in music, in Tokyo. ;)
    
    He then asked about my 'Ginger and the Snaps' aquisition:
    
    > 
    > Same question. Where did you find these? Are you holding out? :-)
    > 
    
    Sorry, you can't take credit for this one...:). I found this locally on 
    an otherwise kind of shoddy 'Girl Group Sound' compilation series. I saw 
    the G+TS song, which I hadn't heard before, and had to buy it. I am still 
    under the spell of I-must-buy-everything-with-or-associated-to-the-name- 
    BRIAN-WILSON.
    
    CAROL
    
         -----------[ archived by Spectropop ]-----------
    
    Subject:     Guitar Playin' Was the Life for Him
    Sent:        11/14/97 6:25 AM
    Received:    11/14/97 11:03 AM
    From:        James K Cribb, jkcrXXX@XXXXXXcom
    To:          Spectropop  List, spectroXXX@XXXXXXies.com
    
    I too saw the obit for Tommy Tedesco, who I think had been so fresh in 
    many of our minds as we've been listening a lot lately to the Pet Sounds 
    sessions.
    
    I knew of his work with Brian and Spector but I was amazed at all the 
    other work he'd done, particularly TV (Bonanza, Green Acres, M*A*S*H) and 
    film (Godfather, Field of Dreams). 
    
    And the hits: "Along Comes Mary," "Eve of Destruction," MacArthur Park," 
    ...
    
    I'm not sure if he was the most recorded guitarist, but damn he must've 
    been the most listened to.  What a legacy he has left us.
    
    James
    
         -----------[ archived by Spectropop ]-----------
    
    Subject:     Re: Spectropop V#0013 - Wildwwwds
    Sent:        11/14/97 2:13 PM
    Received:    11/15/97 3:54 AM
    From:        Javed Jafri, javedjaXXX@XXXXXX.ca
    To:          Spectropop List, spectroXXX@XXXXXXies.com
    
    No Good To Cry was also covered rather badly IMO by the Poppy Family and 
    was a hit here in Canada...and here's some Wildweeds trivia, Al  Anderson 
    was a member of this band and he later went on to form NRBQ who as far as 
    I know are still rocking.
    
    Javed
    
    >From:        Big L, bXXX@XXXXXXt
     
    > BTW, I'd like to list a few songs that I loved, even though they weren't 
    > No Good To Cry - Wildweeds
    > River Is Wide - Forum
    
    
         -----------[ archived by Spectropop ]-----------
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