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Spectropop V#0110

  • From: The Spectropop Group
  • Date: 07/02/98

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          Volume #0110                             July 4, 1998      
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
      The perfect music of the Victrola gives dancing a new delight  
    
    
    
    Subject:     Re: Ronettes, re-recordings and a reality check
    Sent:        07/01/98 10:33 am
    Received:    07/02/98 12:14 am
    From:        Marc Wielage
    To:          Spectropop List
    
    Jamie LePage commented on the Spectropop list:
    
    >Ronnie tried to cover one or two of her Spector titles with poor 
    >results. In fact, she only achieved success After The Wall with 
    >Eddie Money on a record that wouldn't exist without Philles and 
    >Mr. Spector. Is Ronnie a victim, or is she a benefactor? Darlene 
    >Love too continued to make a living out of singing her Spector 
    >hits, even in that Ellie Greenwich musical. She sang lead on Dick
    >Dale and Al Casey hits too, but does she sue them? I really don't 
    >know, but I can attest to learning of her first from Phil Spector
    >records.
    ------------------------------------------------
    
    Fame is one thing, but a contract is a contract. If the written 
    contract says "we will pay you X cents royalties per record sold,"
    then that's that. The technicality that Spector is using is that, 
    after they juggle the books, none of these songs has ever made any
    profit.
    
    There's a similar problem that's gone on in Hollywood for years. 
    When movies like COMING TO AMERICA, which grossed more than 
    $300,000,000, technically "made no profit," then you know there's 
    a lot of shenanigans going on.
    
    Unfortunately, Spector himself is a very cagey, extremely shrewd 
    businessman. Me personally, I suspect The Ronettes are screwed, 
    though morally, he should've just settled with them and given them
    a couple of hundred grand to which they're clearly entitled.
    
    
    >Should artists that got ripped off re-record their hits for 
    >better money and forget about the old deal (original hits), or 
    >should they sue the people who actually gave them the success? 
    >Both? Tough call. 
    ------------------------------------------------
    
    The re-recording issue is a real problem for collectors. Me 
    personally, I sympathize with the plight of the artists, but I 
    think nobody would buy the fake versions if they were clearly 
    identified as such.
    
    Quick side story:  I once had to help shoot a series of mail-order
    "TV commercials in the 1970s for a producer who was hawking those 
    20 ORIGINAL HITS! SUNG BY THE ORIGINALS!" albums. When the track 
    started playing back in the studio, I turned to the guy and said 
    (after hearing about two notes), "oh, come on! That's not the real 
    song!"  He laughed and said, "I hired a Nashville studio group to 
    do all those soundalikes, and for the purposes of this record, we 
    called the group 'The Originals.'  So technically, it is 20 
    original hits, performed by 'The Originals.'"  I winced.
    
    Somebody should post the details of how the original "Key 7" 
    soundalikes got recorded in the early 1970s. I believe those were 
    the sources for most of the Percy Sledge, Lesley Gore, etc. 
    recordings out there. I'm not sure if they were affiliated with 
    K-Tel or what the exact story was, but I think GOLDMINE got to the
    bottom of that mess some years ago.
    
    
    >One last thing on this topic, it seems the Swinging Blue Jeans hit 
    >version of Hippy Hippy Shake is now fairly obscure.
    ------------------------------------------------
    
    Not at all. I show the original as being out on at least 8 
    different CDs:
    Best of British Rock ~ Capitol CDL-57266 (1:43 mono)
    The British Invasion: The History of British Rock - Vol. 1 ~ Rhino 
    R2-70319
    (1:43 stereo)
    Classic Rock - 1964 ~ Time-Life 2CLR-03 (1:43 stereo)
    Hippy Hippy Shake: The Definitive Collection ~ EMI 80256 (2:37 stereo)
    The History of Rock 'N' Roll: The British Invasion - 1964-1966 ~ Time-Life
    R962-07 (1:44 stereo)
    The Hits of 1963 ~ MFP (UK) 6033 (1:44 mono)
    Mighty Sixties - Vol. 10 ~ Wave (Jap.)  (2:05 mono - ext. vers.?)
    The Northern Beat ~ London (UK) 840 968 (1:43 mono)
    
    
    Granted, at least three of the above are non-U.S. imports, but all
    the others are readily available, particularly the Rhino and 
    Time-Life comps.
    
    --MFW
    
    -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    -= Marc Wielage      |   "The computerized authority     =-
    -= MusicTrax, Ltd.   |       on rock, pop, & soul."      =-
    -= Chatsworth, CA    |         XXXX@XXXtrax.com         =-
    -=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-
    
    
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    Subject:     Re: Ronettes, re-recordings and a reality check
    Sent:        07/02/98 2:16 am
    Received:    07/02/98 12:15 am
    From:        Jamie LePage, le_page_XXXX@XXXties.com
    To:          Spectropop List, spectroXXXX@XXXties.com
    
    Marc Wielage wrote:
    
    >The technicality that Spector is using is that, after they 
    >juggle the books, none of these songs has ever made any profit.
    
    That's what's they do in the "creative accounting" department ;-)
    
    >I suspect The Ronettes are screwed, though morally, (Spector) 
    >should've just settled with them and given them a couple of
    >hundred grand to which they're clearly entitled.
    
    I absolutely agree. See, you have to keep in mind that Phil Spector 
    isn't alone in owning and exploiting masters for which artist 
    royalties are subject to substandard rates. It's good promo for
    a label to "generously" grant reasonable artist royalties on their old 
    masters even though the original deals don't require it. It's ironic 
    that if Phil gave them a few hundred grand, he'd be adding a great 
    little chapter to the legend: Tycoon of Teen rewards Spanish Harlem 
    Cinderella Trio for His Records. In time, it would be worth every 
    penny. On the other hand, it's still a great little chapter. It's 
    just that it's all like this.
    --
    le_page_XXXX@XXXties.com
    RodeoDrive/5030
    
    
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    Subject:     The Honeys: The One You Can't Have
    Sent:        07/01/98 3:02 pm
    Received:    07/02/98 12:15 am
    From:        Brad Elliott, surfXXXX@XXXnline.net
    To:          Spectropop List, spectroXXXX@XXXties.com
    
    Marc Wielage (XXXX@XXXtrax.com) wrote:
    
    > And finally, I notice in the more-or-less final mix of the song, 
    > it's provided in 2-track stereo (vocals on one side / instruments 
    > on the other). With a little work, it might be possible to create 
    > a reasonable-sounding stereo mix out of it, one that would sound 
    > considerably better than the monos on the BRILL BUILDING boxed set
    > or the Rhino BEST OF THE GIRL GROUPS VOL. 2 CD. I haven't checked 
    > it against the Capitol HONEYS disc yet, but I'd be surprised if 
    > that one was stereo.
    
    You'd be wrong, Marc. With the exception of "The Love of a Boy and
    a Girl," which was a mono demo, the entire Capitol Honeys CD is in 
    glorious stereo! Every one of their singles was remixed from the 
    original 3- and 8-track masters. As good as "The One You Can't 
    Have" is, you gotta hear "He's a Doll"! And the best part is 
    they're back-to-back on the CD -- what a one-two punch!
    
    > Has anybody ever found out who actually sang lead on this song? 
    > Are you sure it wasn't Marilyn Wilson? Both Wilson sisters have 
    > said in the past that their mother sings great.
    
    I'm sorry -- Marilyn's a heck of a nice person, but in my opinion 
    she can barely carry a tune (which is no crime -- neither can I). 
    Most of the Honeys' lead vocals were by cousin Ginger Blake, who 
    was possessed of a great set of pipes. She spent most of the 
    Sixties and Seventies singing professionally as a backing singer. 
    She's sung behind, among others, Richard Harris ("McArthur Park"),
    Tommy Roe ("Dizzy"), Three Dog Night ("Celebrate"), the Four Tops 
    ("Keeper of the Castle"), the Righteous Brothers ("Rock and Roll 
    Heaven"), Glen Campbell ("Rhinestone Cowboy") and even the Rolling
    Stones (the Beggar's Banquet album).
    
    "The One You Can't Have" definitely was sung by Ginger. By 
    comparison, Marilyn sang "Pray for Surf."
    
    Jack Madani (Jack_MadXXXX@XXX12.nj.us) wrote:
    
    > I recently saw a Curb CD greatest hits package for the Hondells,
    > but it has like only a dozen cuts on it so I passed on it. OTOH, 
    > it may possibly have My Buddy Seat taken from the master tapes.
    
    I've seen this CD, too. Has anybody picked it up? I'd love to know
    if the master tapes were used and how it sounds.
    
    Surf's up!
    Brad
    
    
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    Subject:     Re: Spectropop V#0109
    Sent:        07/01/98 4:15 pm
    Received:    07/02/98 12:15 am
    From:        Billy G. Spradlin, bilXXXX@XXXre.net
    To:          Spectropop List, spectroXXXX@XXXties.com
    
    
    >And finally, I notice in the more-or-less final mix of the song, 
    >it's provided in 2-track stereo (vocals on one side / instruments 
    >on the other). With a little work, it might be possible to create 
    >a reasonable-sounding stereo mix out of it, one that would sound 
    >considerably better than the monos on the BRILL BUILDING boxed set
    >or the Rhino BEST OF THE GIRL GROUPS VOL. 2 CD. I haven't checked 
    >it against the Capitol HONEYS disc yet, but I'd be surprised if 
    >that one was stereo.
    
    I have that Honeys CD, and "The One You Can't Have" is a Stereo 
    Remix and it sounds great, especially on Headphones! The Remix is 
    much fuller sounding than the original mono 45 with the backing 
    track and background vocals mixed up higher. Its one of the few 
    Remixes I have heard that improves on the original record. The 
    majority of the Honeys CD is remixed except for some late 1960s 
    and mid 1970s tracks. Those Honeys singles were terrific, I have 
    no idea why Brian didn't had any success with his non-B.B.'s 
    productions. I believe that Honey's CD is now out of print, but if
    you see it grab it ASAP!
    
    Another Favorite Remix is Dusty Springfield's "Stay Awhile" on the
    Targon Reissue of "I Only Want To Be With You/Stay Awhile-Dusty) 
    Two-fer. The original mono mix has always sounded tinny and 
    super-distorted, but the stereo remix really brings out the great 
    drumming on that song! I was disappointed that the compilers of the
    Mercury 3-CD box didn't include these remixes, and used horrid 
    sounding reprocessed stereo instead!!
    Billy G. Spradlin
    
    
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    Subject:     the war of sound
    Sent:        07/02/98 6:44 am
    Received:    07/02/98 7:15 am
    From:        john rausch, jXXXX@XXXohio.net
    To:          Spectropop List, spectroXXXX@XXXties.com
    
    just got my new issue of goldmine and thought id share with
    everyone...there is a small article on ronnie verses phil in the 
    courtroom with a picture of phil and the ronettes that I have 
    never seen before 
    jonr
    
    
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    Subject:     Re: Spectropop V#0107
    Sent:        07/03/98 12:26 pm
    Received:    07/04/98 2:28 am
    From:        Doc Rock, docroXXXX@XXXcom
    To:          Spectropop List, spectroXXXX@XXXties.com
    
    > Almost always, the alleged re-recordings were, in 
    >fact, the original recordings. However, the version of "The Letter" 
    >on one of these albums CLEARLY was a re-recording. The voice was
    >most certainly Alex Chilton, but it sounded like the Alex Chilton 
    >from his "High Priest" album days and not the gruff blue-eyed soul
    >days of the Box Tops. Perhaps this is the version that you heard on
    >the radio.
    >
    >-- Scott
    
    
    Would it have been played PRIOR to the hit version?
    Doc
    
    
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    Subject:     Re: Spectropop V#0108
    Sent:        07/03/98 12:26 pm
    Received:    07/04/98 2:29 am
    From:        Doc Rock, docroXXXX@XXXcom
    To:          Spectropop List, spectroXXXX@XXXties.com
    
    Was everyone aware that Robin (aka Jackie) Ward was the female 
    voice on Pat Boone's "Speedy Gonzales?"
    
    Or that her voice was speeded up on "Wonderful Summer" to make her
    sound young?
    
    Robin was her daughter's name.
    
    
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    Subject:     Re-recordings
    Sent:        07/03/98 12:37 pm
    Received:    07/04/98 2:29 am
    From:        Paul Urbahns, PaulurbXXXX@XXXom
    To:          Spectropop List, spectroXXXX@XXXties.com
    
    In a message dated 98-06-30 14:35:53 EDT, you write:
    
    << Not many would hold a gun to an artist's head. The artists 
    re-record their hits, get a fair royalty and a decent advance. Are
    they compromising? >>
    
    The K-Tel remakes that most of the discussion is about concern 
    1970's recordings made in Nashville. I talked with the producer of
    these recordings and was told that they took the Rock On book and 
    started contacting original members of some of the groups. I was 
    discussing The Diamonds in particular for an article I was working
    on. Anyway, he pulled out the original contract and it was signed 
    by the original members not the reformed group that was currently 
    touring. The engineer (I can't remember his name, but could look 
    it up) stated he remembered that session because it was like a 
    homecoming because some of them hadn't seen each other in quite 
    a few years. The contracts as I understand it was for a flat cash 
    fee, no royalties. K-Tel wanted to own the masters so they could
    sub lease them. The artists which they re-recorded were ones that no
    longer had a recording contract with any record company. Stan 
    Shulman was one of the guys I talked to. He is a fairly well 
    known producer of the 60's.
    
    In the case of some of the artists they wanted to re-record the 
    songs because the originals are not available for leasing, that's 
    why they probably did 20 on Chubby Checker. they had trouble using
    some of the original group names, like the Platters. So on many of 
    the releases it lists Paul Robi and Tony Williams of The Platters.
    Some artists own the rights to their hits (Freddy Cannon is one) 
    and therefore they sub licensed the originals.
    
    I looked up the names here they are:
    The Engineer I talked to was Paul Whitehead and he told me the 
    masters were cut at Audio media recorders on 19th Ave South in 
    Nashville. By SJ Productions which is related to Key seven music 
    somehow, but I am not sure.. Stan Shulman, whom I also talked with 
    was the Executive producer. Stan owned Dunes label in the 60's He 
    discovered Ray Peterson "Tell Laura I Love Her", He was involved 
    with Pretty Little Angel eyes and Phil Spector. He owns a 
    Nashville publishing company that published Kentucky Rain when 
    Elvis had a hit with it (written by Eddie Rabbitt).
    
    I have other information but I doubt if you are interested that 
    they used 24 track tape machines. The audiophile issues are 
    normally in wide stereo but the general releases are mixed almost 
    to mono. As far as I know only the Gary US Bonds recordings had to
    be withdrawn from release. Frank Guida took K-Tel to court and I am
    not sure of the result but K-Tel now licenses the originals from 
    Guida. Of course I have the original K-Tel remakes. I bought them 
    hoping they would be better quality (sound-wise) than the 
    originals but they tried to imitate the originals and the remakes
    are really bad.
    Paul URbahns
    paulurbXXXX@XXXom
    
    
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