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Spectropop - Digest Number 912



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. More Bass-ics...
           From: Alan Gordon 
      2. Re: Rick Nelson, Glen Campbell & Jerry Fuller - Lost Recordings
           From: Mikey 
      3. Re: Jan and Dean and Eve
           From: Alan Gordon 
      4. Re: Rick Nelson, Glen Campbell & Jerry Fuller - Lost Recordings
           From: Michael Edwards 
      5. Re: Dave Clark dolls
           From: Bill George 
      6. Re: Spectropop party
           From: Bill George 
      7. Re:  Beverly Bremers
           From: Simon White 
      8. Re: Beverly Bremers
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
      9. Re: PMS pressings
           From: Alan V. Karr 
     10. Re: The Critters
           From: Clark Besch 
     11. Re: I Don't Want To Discuss It
           From: Clark Besch 
     12. Re: Robbs
           From: Clark Besch 
     13. Who or what is Bartok Lanski (?), "Back To You"
           From: Lindsay 
     14. Re: Four Seasons/Beach Boys/Robbs
           From: Lapka Larry 
     15. Re: Beverly Bremers
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
     16. Re: Beverly Bremers
           From: James Cassidy 
     17. Re: Wilson/Valli
           From: Mike Miller 
     18. Stumble and fall right down like a clown
           From: John Rausch 
     19. Re: Dave Clark dolls
           From: Mikey 
     20. Robbs; Jersey Surfin'
           From: Bob Rashkow 
     21. Popcorn Double Feature
           From: David Coyle 
     22. Re: Alternate Coasters
           From: David Coyle 
     23. Pat Lewis
           From: John Clemente 
     24. Re: Jackie on Rhino
           From: Bill George 
     25. Re: London
           From: Bill George 


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Message: 1
   Date: Mon, 09 Jun 2003 15:03:21 -0700
   From: Alan Gordon 
Subject: More Bass-ics...

My two cents, expounding on Mr. Harvey's buck and a half

According to the usually reliable Tony Bacon, there was an electric bass 
previous to Fenders.  Paul Tutmark of Audiovox produced one in 1936 
according to his catalogue.

Fender's first electric bass was produced in 1951.  It was christened the 
Fender Precision Bass, and was designed to look like the just released 
Telecaster guitar (whose name had also just changed from Broadcaster to 
Telecaster, because Gretsch had a set of drums named the Broadcaster set).

In 1954 the design of the Precision changed to look more like a big 
brother of the futuristically contoured Stratocaster. Both bass guitars 
had the same basic overall measurements and shape, but because of the body 
contours and different shaped pickguard, the 1954 version was 
significantly more jet-age looking. I think the scale length was the same, 
and besides the smoothly contoured body and pickguard, the only real 
difference was that the strings passed through the body below the bridge 
and anchored themselves in 4 metal ferrules.

Things evolved a bit in 1957 when the new two-piece humbucking pickups 
replaced the earlier single-coil "bar" type, and the head-stock became the 
recognizable Fender ikon.

albabe



-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Mon, 09 Jun 2003 20:25:53 -0400 From: Mikey Subject: Re: Rick Nelson, Glen Campbell & Jerry Fuller - Lost Recordings Albabe: > I forgot who was mentioning in here that they were going to pick up > the "Rick Nelson, Glen Campbell & Jerry Fuller - Lost Recordings." > I'm curious what he/she or anyone thinks of the package? That was me, and I did pick it up, and its a very nice package. Sound quality is terriffic. Also, possibly the only place where Glen Campbells 1961 Crest hit "Turn Around, Look At Me" is from master tape. Well worth the money. Mikey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Mon, 09 Jun 2003 16:25:08 -0700 From: Alan Gordon Subject: Re: Jan and Dean and Eve Phil MiIstein: > Now, anybody wanna hear Jan & Dean's version? Yea... me... please... What album was that on, sir? peace, albabe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Mon, 09 Jun 2003 20:30:48 -0400 From: Michael Edwards Subject: Re: Rick Nelson, Glen Campbell & Jerry Fuller - Lost Recordings Alan Gordon asks: > I forgot who was mentioning in here that they were going to pick up > the "Rick Nelson, Glen Campbell & Jerry Fuller - Lost Recordings." > I'm curious what he/she or anyone thinks of the package? It's just so wonderful to get a CD like this: there are so few quality sounding CDs covering pre-Beatles' 60s pop being issued now. For me, the highlight is Jerry Fuller singing "First Love Never Dies" also done by Frankie Avalon and the Walker Bothers. Mike Edwards -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Mon, 09 Jun 2003 21:33:44 EDT From: Bill George Subject: Re: Dave Clark dolls I have nothing to comment about the dolls, but I did hear Dave Clark interviewed on the radio a few weeks ago. I guess he's put a new band together and is back on the road. Anyone heard him yet? Bill George -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Mon, 09 Jun 2003 21:35:14 EDT From: Bill George Subject: Re: Spectropop party The S'pop Team wrote: > On entry, all S'pop members will be handed a Back To Mono button - > preferable to name badges, we thought. How about Back To Mono buttons with our screen names written on them? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 02:25:16 +0100 From: Simon White Subject: Re: Beverly Bremers David Bell wrote: > I'm sure that I'm teaching my granny to suck eggs here but I > hope Beverly Ann is aware that there are 4 lovely black and > white pix of her in the booklet that accompanies the BMG CD > release "Turning My Heartbeat Up" (7431 774012). She looks fab! > > As Kev Roberts wrote "Country / Pop singer with one of two > Northern soul associations. A real obscurity and poor seller > to boot. I can imagine the look on her face as someone runs > into her at a flea market in Wyoming, revealing she's a star > in the UK." The song is "He's Coming Home", of course. So does > she realise she's a star in the UK, Simon? I didn't know the pics were there myself! Its a cd I dont have. But tomorrow is another day. Beverly was contacted by someone from Canada via her new website: http://www.beverlybremers.com/main_page/ He told her she had two big records on RCA ("Get Smart Girl" on Scepter also got played) on the Northern scene and of course she had no idea what he was talking about, so looked it up on the web and .... she contacted Kev Roberts and he's interviewed her for his radio show. Incidently Kev's show has a fantastic interview every week. She happened to be in London this weekend and Kev suggested we meet up. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 02:21:39 -0000 From: Billy G. Spradlin Subject: Re: Beverly Bremers I just posted both sides of Beverly Bremers' Showcase single to Musica. (another one of my thrift store finds - wonder what I could get for it on E-bay?) I wonder who came up with the idea of doing "The Great Pretender" mid- sixites Motown style. It's an interesting arrangement of a Doo-Wop classic. "We Got Trouble" is another "good girl-loves-bad boy" song. Anyway she sounds great on both sides. My only gripes is the production sounds a little skimpy and I wish the end of "Pretender" wasn't faded out... Billy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 04:57:54 -0000 From: Alan V. Karr Subject: Re: PMS pressings Well, going back a about a decade earlier, CBS/Columbia wound up their historical/familial arrangement with EMI, mostly or partly due to EMI's reluctance to accept the 33 RPM LP format. Philips decided to enter the British market using US product as a linchpin, releasing discs on the Philips and later Fontana labels. Initially this partnership worked very well but mostly one-sided for Philips in England. British product languished on the then-weak CBS sister Epic label stateside, and few discs (Marty Wilde's Bad Boy, Frankie Vaughan's Judy) did much business here. Simultaneously, Mercury's UK distribution changed a few times, from Pye- Nixa (the terms were strict- Pye was not permitted to carry other US labels ala London under the deal-when it was terminated Pye International was created) and then to EMI c. 1959. The EMI license deal overlapped Philips' 1962 purchase by some months but by 1964, Mercury was one of Philips' UK labels too. Several English groups signed or leased to UK Mercury during the beat boom confusing the matter more. I dont think Mercury was ever slated to be an EMI acquisition, I think MGM was a more likely candidate at that time although certainly EMI enjoyed several British hits in their Mercury deal. I would agree that Philips (and Siemens-Polydor, as they entered into their joint venture at this time, having themselves had an American distribution arrangement with US Decca-thats how the Beatles Hamburg recording of My Bonnie came to be released in the USA) ran their US division on the cheap, (or worse as referred to by such as Ken Pitt in his excellent early Bowie bio, "The Pitt Report") One glance at the cheesy label lettering, misaligned labels and self-destructing record sleeves and "bootleg" is the word that comes to mind. Regards, Alan V. Karr -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 06:04:29 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: The Critters Chris, I have both "Look at the Girls" 45 and all Bob Dileo singles. I think Bob sounds like the vocalist on the Copout 45. If you are looking for the Dileo 45's, I got them all as they were released and dated them all. "Band in Boston" was received 9/12/68 and is really cool pop/psych. Followup "Just Can't Help Believin'" b/w "Mind Excursion' dated 5/31/69 (BJ Thomas' version of "Believin'" was aound 6/70). "Jessica" dated 8/23/69. Nothing that special on followup singles. All were on Columbia. The Copout 45 was on Poppy which also had Alan Bown 45 I think, or was that Music factory? Looked about the same label from my memory. Anyway, hope this helps and if you ever find out who Bob Dileo was, please post it here! Thanks, Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 06:15:17 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: I Don't Want To Discuss It Bill Craig wrote: > The first version I ever heard of "Discuss It" was by Rhinoceros > in either '68 or '69. I think they were on Electra. The Rod Stewart > is really quite good also, coming from fairly early in his recording > life. Bill, the Robbs' version came out around May, 1968. Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 06:41:45 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Robbs Larry, the Robbs were certainly a local band in many ways. Altho on Dick Clark tours and the show, they played a ton of Chicago dates and were the big thing in hometown Milwaukee. Even in late 67 and early 68, after a year of all the above and the end of their Mercury career, they stuck close to home it seemed. I also think that with the exception of LA, where "Next Time You See Me" was a #1 most requested song, they did quite well in the midwest, but failed everywhere else basically. Another possiblity for the national failure was their often somewhat lethargic ballad cover renderings on "Action" and possibly their Beatles moptop haircuts that were getting out of style some by mid 67? If you heard their "Blowin' in the Wind" or "You've Got Your Troubles" Action performances, you'd likely agree. Ashame if so, because their records were anything but lethargic! They were crisp, polished pure pop that captured all the different sounds of the era. Of course, the Raiders eclipsed the other "regulars" on Action as you said. They'd been doing their schtick longer and were simply better performers and they had HITS! Going up against Steve Alaimo, Keith Allison, the Hardtimes and even the Robbs was easy. In the Robbs' defense, I'm thinking the only released song of theirs that was performed on "Action" was "Race With the Wind". Dick Clark did really try to do them right, tho. Even after "Race" had done well in Chicago, he put it on Bandstand's "Rate a Record" as a test saying "this is not really a new song"! Whaa??? Dick isn't "Rate a Record" supposed to be for new records??? Anyway, it unfortunately lost that battle too! Take care, Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 11:26:29 -0000 From: Lindsay Subject: Who or what is Bartok Lanski (?), "Back To You" There's a webpage I really like called Please Please Me which entertainingly lists and comments on a number of Beatles-like tracks. Some of them are blatant cash-ins (such as The Buggs and The Liverpools), but others are a matter of influence (Easybeats, Swinging Blue Jeans, Hollies). Some of them are up there for download as mp3s. One of the mp3s is a track the website guy taped off a radio show (KROQ) in '86, and he's not sure of the artist. He thinks they might be from San Diego. The song is "Back To Me", an infectious piece of neo-Merseyside with chunky Beatles-style harmonica, and the artist/s MIGHT be "Bartok Lanski". I can't find any trace of such a band, or person, anywhere on the web. Someone here might be able to identify it: it's at: http://www.deathbarney.com/Lets_Be_The_Beatles/Albums/Please_Please_Me.htm Scroll right down to the last item. Thanks chums, Lindsay -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 10:11:43 -0700 (PDT) From: Lapka Larry Subject: Re: Four Seasons/Beach Boys/Robbs Dear All: With all the talk about the Four Seasons vs. the Beach Boys, could someone tell me if "East Meets West" is available on CD? If not, maybe someone could post it to Musica? I distinctly remember seeing this record in the 45 racks of the old Record World chain here in New York, but for some reason, I never bought the record. As for the Robbs, I have contacted several record companies to try to get their music out legitimately, but so far no takers. If anyone is interested, I have a CDR of their music that I once again am offering to anybody who wants to hear it. Larry Lapka -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 08:39:48 -0000 From: Billy G. Spradlin Subject: Re: Beverly Bremers I just did a search with Google and found out Beverly has a website at http://www.beverlybremers.com Billy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 08:48:05 -0400 From: James Cassidy Subject: Re: Beverly Bremers Somewhat contrary to the quote from Kev Roberts, Beverly Bremers was not a complete unknown here in the US; she did have one major hit, "Don't Say You Don't Remember", #15 on Billboard in 1971. Jim Cassidy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 13:47:07 -0400 From: Mike Miller Subject: Re: Wilson/Valli Dave, i am not sure who has the most top 40 hits. all i know is that many of recordings of both groups are really great and that many of their best or most interesting were not necessarily the most popular at their time or the most popular in their catalogue. many of the later 60's recordings of both entities are among their best. one listen to "i know there's an answer" and "the night was so young" by the beach boys and "raven" and "saturdays father" by the four seasons and you can hear the progression and varied sound of both. comparing these two groups or even as single artists (valli vs. wilson) will not find a "winner". as far as i am concerned, both are winners. their body of work speaks for itself and the entire music world is much better off with their contributions to all of music. these two acts were enormously successful and greatly contributed to most forms of music during their heydeys and afterwards. i for one wish more music was released by both of these acts during the sixties period. the constant touring and branching out by various members took their collective tolls on both groups, and caused them to have less studio time actually making records. doowopdaddy (mike miller) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 16:26:10 -0400 From: John Rausch Subject: Stumble and fall right down like a clown In a recent post, someone asked about the dj/stock version of Philles 123... Check out Mark Lanwher`s wonderful site, The Philles Label Gallery: http://home.tbbs.net/~msland/Spector/PSindex.htm Scroll down to the Stumble And Fall link to get your answer. John Rausch -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 16:49:38 -0400 From: Mikey Subject: Re: Dave Clark dolls Bill George: > ...but I did hear Dave Clark interviewed on the radio a few weeks ago. > I guess he's put a new band together and is back on the road. Anyone > heard him yet? You mean Mike Smith, the lead singer. Dave Clark isn't going to touch a drum set ever again. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 18:28:30 EDT From: Bob Rashkow Subject: Robbs; Jersey Surfin' (Or: Sherry, Candy and Dawn are Surfer Girls!) Thanks Larry Lapka and Patrick Rands, you're probably right that the Robbs suffered from too much exposure by Dick Clark, and not enough from Mercury Records. How sad! If I remember they did manage to get some teen mag coverage & were in a paperback book from around '68 that featured only pop acts with really good-looking guys in them. Every Mother's Son and the Evergreen Blues were in it and possibly the Monkees, Grapefruit, and the Five Americans and the Strawberry Alarm Clock--don't remember the name of it. It made the rounds of some 6th-grade girls and that's where I first saw the name The Robbs. What was the release month of RWTW? Larry or Patrick? I seem to dimly recall hearing it once or twice at camp on someone's transistor--was it summer '67??? Mike Miller: > the constant touring and branching out by various members took their > collective tolls on both groups, and caused them to have less studio > time actually making records. Especially true, I think, in the case of the Beach Boys' LPs. Considering the rate at which the top moneymakers were churning out product in those days, it must have been quite an event in the recording industry when they finally came out with Smiley Smile--a true 6Ts classic to which they gave their all & which demonstrated that they were ready for the changing patterns just ahead. Bobster -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 17:04:07 -0700 (PDT) From: David Coyle Subject: Popcorn Double Feature The Castaways didn't do "Popcorn Double Feature"... I'm pretty sure you're thinking of "Lavender Popcorn," which I think in the UK was done by a group called Scrugg. The Castaways version is on their compilation CD on Plum, called "Liar Liar: The Best Of The Castaways." It has all their singles, some unreleased tracks and great liner notes, but is brought down a notch by a number of '70s/'80s bar-band era tracks. David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 17:28:01 -0700 (PDT) From: David Coyle Subject: Re: Alternate Coasters This wasn't some nostalgia-fest disc, like the common Searchers and Gerry and the Pacemakers discs that have Gerry doing "Imagine" and Mike Pender's Searchers doing "Red Ferrari." This was about 18-20 tracks, most of them familiar titles, but then saying "alternate version -- take 20" or "stereo version" or whatever. I don't remember enough about it, and that's why I asked. Maybe I just imagined it...since I didn't pick it up and don't own it, I can't prove it even exists. Here's looking forward to a new Coasters compilation. The last available US disc besides the budget "Very Best Of The Coasters" disc was a 2-CD set called "50 Coastin' Classics," which was probably passable in the early '90s. I wish I could have found Sequel's expanded edition of their original "Greatest Hits" album, but all I managed to snare was the "Coastin' With The Coasters" reissue, which at least got me the original version of "Ain't That Just Like Me?" Wonder if the Rhino set will have any unreleased tracks... David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 21:41:39 -0400 From: John Clemente Subject: Pat Lewis Hello All, I recently spoke with Louvain Demps of The Andantes. I'm sorry to report that she informed me that singer Pat Lewis is seriously ill. The Rhythm and Blues foundation has set up a fund for Ms. Lewis. When I find out any more information, I will pass it on. John Clemente -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 22:35:57 EDT From: Bill George Subject: Re: Jackie on Rhino I can heartily recommend this disc (Surprise!) Jackie's first Atlantic album is probably the peak of her career. And the unreleased tracks are as good and soulful as anything she ever released. My eternal gratitude to anyone who can tell me who wrote "When I'm Gone." -Bill -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Tue, 10 Jun 2003 23:08:29 EDT From: Bill George Subject: Re: London Andrew Hickey ranted: > London has an intense aura of evil about it that means only > truly great music can entice me down... I've always found London to feel like "home." I wish it was. Any Londoners want to trade flats with me in NYC??? - Bill -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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