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Spectropop - Digest Number 824



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                        Jamie LePage (1953-2002)
                  http://www.spectropop.com/Jamie.htm
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There are 23 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Where The Girls Are
           From: S'pop Team 
      2. Re : Always Something There To Remind Me
           From: Tony Bayliss 
      3. Re: Gary & the Hornets
           From: Tom Taber 
      4. Re: "Always Something There To Remind Me"
           From: Paul Lewis 
      5. Matthew Fisher; Four Seasons on Gone; Studio A; Requiem trouble
           From: Country Paul 
      6. Round Robin/Bon Bons
           From: Ian Chapman 
      7. Lincoln Chase 'n me
           From: Phil Milstein 
      8. Alex Chilton -The Letter
           From: Jonathan Litchfield 
      9. Beverley Jones
           From: Stuffed Animal 
     10. R&RHOF; side point to the Main Point; Lou Johnson
           From: Country Paul 
     11. Re: Where The Girls Are Volume 5
           From: Billy G Spradlin 
     12. Latest Newsletter
           From: Ken Charmer 
     13. Adam Faith/Dusty Lana
           From: Ken Silverwood 
     14. Re: Friend & Lover
           From: Dan Hughes 
     15. Re: Lou Johnson's "(There's) Always Something There To Remind Me"
           From: Ken Silverwood 
     16. Re: Lou Johnson's "(There's) Always Something There To Remind Me"
           From: Shawn Baldwin 
     17. Re: Where The Girls Are Volume 5
           From: Mick Patrick 
     18. Re: Bon Bons / Shangs
           From: Andres Andres 
     19. Re: Nino Tempo & April Stevens
           From: David Coyle 
     20. Re: Lou Johnson / Beverley Jones
           From: Mick Patrick 
     21. Re: Meet Me At Mary's Place
           From: David Coyle 
     22. re: Downtown
           From: Simon White 
     23. It's Not Easy by Normie Rowe
           From: Norman 


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Message: 1 Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 12:10:59 -0000 From: S'pop Team Subject: Where The Girls Are New at S'pop Recommends - Where The Girls Are, Volume 5 "A CD that has clearly set the standard for girl group compilations to come?" Why, Miss Sheila B must surely be referring to the latest addition to the "Where The Girls Are" series! It appears she quite likes it. Click here to find out why: http://www.spectropop.com/recommends/ Enjoy! The S'pop Team Spectropop - Spectacular! Retro! Pop! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 01:17:35 -0000 From: Tony Bayliss Subject: Re : Always Something There To Remind Me asks Andrew Jones: >I have the Shaw and Warwick versions, but I've never heard the >complete Johnson version. Has anyone? Is it worth my seeking out? Most definitely is it worth finding. IMHO I have always preferred the Lou Johnson version to the other two. My copy is on Canadian Quality (#1655) with the original recording credited to Big Hill Records. Playing it again just now, the thought strikes me that it was most probably conducted/arranged by Mr.Bacharach himself .. his style is almost unmistakeable .. horns, piano, female back ground singers. The B side is also well worth a listen .. strictly instrumental, although credited to Lou Johnson, it is another Bacharach/David composition. 'Magic Potion'. Tony Baylis -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sat, 15 Mar 2003 17:36:03 -0800 (PST) From: Tom Taber Subject: Re: Gary & the Hornets John Fox: > they recorded the first version of "There's A Kind of Hush" > that I ever heard--months before Herman's Hermits' version. I had just seen on a "chart" list a music survey that had both versions "tied" I believe at #13 - might have been an Ohio station. It's such a great, fun to sing-along song - did its composer(s) have other successes? Tom Taber -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 02:02:41 +0000 From: Paul Lewis Subject: Re: "Always Something There To Remind Me" Andrew Jones:5 Mar 2003 01:24:40 -0500 (EST) >I have the Shaw and Warwick versions, but I've never heard >the complete Johnson version. Has anyone? Is it worth my > seeking out? Thanks. Absolutely. It is taken in usual soulful way. I have it on the Rhino box set the Look of Love: The Burt bacharach Collection. In Australia it was cut down by Warners to a 2 cd set. Thanks Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 01:43:30 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Matthew Fisher; Four Seasons on Gone; Studio A; Requiem trouble Thanks to Phil Chapman for the Max Crook website; great stories! Through it I also linked to Matthew Fisher of Procol Harum (http://www.matthewfisher.com or http://easyweb.easynet.co.uk/~maf/index.html#Album). I was a Procol Harum nut from the "Whiter Shade" (never heard anything like it before) through "Salty Dog." If you related to that music, check this out. Paul Urbahns: >[T]wo of my favorite Four Seasons songs never appear on any >of the reissues and Rhino probably owns the rights. They are >Bermuda and Spanish Lace. Both are very good records. They were originally on Gone, George Goldner's label; they were heavily reissued on many Roulette multi-artist compilations, and shouldn't be too hard to find at record shows today. Steve Harvey, sad about Kit Stewart's passing. "Won't Find Better Than Me" was always a personal favorite. I noticed the Studio A discussion is back. I asked Al Gorgoni (with whom I've since lost touch) about it, but he has no memory of making the record, although he of course acknowledges that he did. As for the lead singer, it doesn't sound like Chip Taylor; Doug's idea of it being Tommy James is much closer to my ears. Ian Chapman: > Country Paul asked for Betty Barnes "Requiem (For A Girl Born > Of The Wrong Times)" to be played to musica. Itís now there > for all to experience. Thank you, Ian. Unfortunately, my computer won't open it for listening because "the file name is bad" (Ah, those Bill Gates- isms) and it won't tell me why. Can anyone help, please? (I'll avoid the obvious pun about "I'm dying to hear it.") And re: Ann Sidney - Miss World? Who'd have thought it from her fluffy little 45? Thanks for the info! Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 12:09:31 -0000 From: Ian Chapman Subject: Round Robin/Bon Bons Guy wrote: > Hi Ian, thanks for the Round Robin info. I don't have that > track "Little People" - could you tell me the writers? Sure thing, Guy - it's a total Page job - written by Billy and arranged by Gene! Flip is an instrumental, "Sit & Dance", credited to Romans/Fink, and has no other credits. Andres: > There are some other recordings in existence that some > attribute to the Weiss and Ganser sisters, > but it is unclear who really did them: the Shangri-Las' > Wishing Well on Spokane and What's Wrong With Ringo? by > the Bon Bons. Andres, There's never been any question that "Wishing Well" is by the real Shangri-Las - it's an early Kama-Sutra production. As indeed was the Shangra-Las (sic) on Smash before that. Check out Mick's liner notes on the fab "Myrmidons of Melodrama" comp for further information. The Bon-Bons question was raised a couple of years ago here on Spectropop. They were a group in their own right - if you take a look in the Photos section in the Miscellaneous folder, their pic is still there. Ian -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 12:40:48 -0500 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Lincoln Chase 'n me Had me a real nice time this morning listening to "Lincoln Chase 'N You", his 1973 solo album on Paramount. Starting with a paen to the sucking noises made when smoking pot, it is a strange LP indeed, yet remains rooted in a swell funk-pop that reminds me, in various places and ways, of Oscar Brown, Jr., Melvin Van Peebles and Exuma the Obeah Man. Highly recommended to anyone who might find something like that appealing. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 12:20:26 -0000 From: Jonathan Litchfield Subject: Alex Chilton -The Letter Steve Harvey wrote: >The story I heard was that Alex was coached by the >producer, Spooner Oldham (?), on how to sing the tune. >He was copying his lead vocal which was erased once >Alex's track was recorded. It was actually Dan Penn who did the coaching. The song was brought to the studio on a demo tape of Wayne Carson Thompson's. Chilton has said "The Box Tops are only marginally my records, I listen to them and I hear Dan Penn, I don't hear me." Those around at the time usually recall a tedious, syllable- by-syllable process of instruction. Penn has played down the suggestion. "They [The Box Tops] came Saturday morning about ten o'clock and they had Alex Chilton with them, who I'd never seen. We started running 'The Letter' down, and he sounded pretty good. I coached him a little, not a lot, told him to say 'aer-o-plane', told him to get a little gruff, and I didn't have to say anything else to him, he was hooking 'em, a natural singer." Both quotes are from Robert Gordon's excellent book It Came From Memphis. Jonathan L -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 19:25:58 +0000 From: Stuffed Animal Subject: Beverley Jones Mick: > I'm cooking up a Beverley Jones interview for publication > on S'pop. Thanks for the info, Sir Patrick . . . but now I'm probably going to piss you off, because I think this is the best version of "Wait 'Til My Bobby Gets Home" that I've ever heard, surpassing the Darlene Love/Spector version! It's those "stumbledrums" that do it for me, as well as Bev's bitchin' vocals. I call this a downright rowdy record, ideal for frat parties!!! Stuff -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 14:42:14 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: R&RHOF; side point to the Main Point; Lou Johnson Larry Lapka: > The Rock & Roll Hall of Fane....why should they not have > their place there? > Neil Diamond > Dave Clark Five > Moody Blues > Monkees (that's right - ask Tom Petty why he got into the > music business) > Michael Nesmith (you don't want the Monkees, then at least > have this guy in there) > Paul Revere and the Raiders > Petula Clark > Cliff Richard > Connie Francis My issue with Neil Diamond, Pet Clark, Cliff Richard and Connie Francis is that they started with rock (Pet Clark only arguably) and consciously "grew out of it." Paul Revere and the Raiders were not the kind of seminal influences I'd wish to see there, nor were the Moody Blues, despite the large successes of both groups. (Okay, I'd go for the Moodies over the Raiders.) Arguably, I'd support the Monkees, since their assemblage caused a major change in the way music was developed and presented, but to me it was as much about commerce as creativity. (Sadly, I wouldn't support Mike Nesmith, although he was my favorite Monkee musically.) Not keeping a scorecard on this stuff, I feel there are far more deserving artists who truly pioneered areas of the music who should be considered first. But that's the trouble with this kind of thing - it's both highly subjective and highly political. I've stepped close enough to the morass - time to pull back (at least for me). Justin McDevitt: > though I never saw Springsteen at the Main Point, I did see > the great Canadian folk artist Stan Rogers, as well as Steve > Goodman, (one of Chicago's finest) Amen to both. Steve Goodman, who I interviewed and who did a live "living room concert" at WHCN, was a gentleman, scholar, talent and righteous human being who was taken too soon. I only know of Stan Rogers from the hilarious and spot-on satire, "Workingman's Holler." Wish I could remember more about it; Dr. Demento used to play it a lot in the early 80's. Andrew Jones, I have to check, but I might have the 45 of Lou Johnson's "Always Something There...." Yes, it is worth acquiring; he had a huge rich voice which he used with tasteful restraint. He was doing a lot of Bacharach & David songs from the Dionne Warwick songbook - he seemed to be on his way to being a "male Dionne" for awhile. (Don't know if he was into psychics, though....) Another high point: his hit doo-wop soul ballad, "Thank You Anyway, Mr. D. J." (on Big Top, I believe); it's tied with my other favorite of his, "Kentucky Bluebird (Message to Martha)." He had a pretty fair string of 45s, almost all of them very good or better. I often wondered if he might have done better with a less-mundane-sounding name. Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 20:02:44 -0000 From: Billy G Spradlin Subject: Re: Where The Girls Are Volume 5 I just got my copy of the CD last week and loving it. The Jan Tanzy track was a nice surprise, did she cut any other great singles? My only (little) gripe is that the CD turns very R&B/Soul oriented in the middle of the CD - did't CBS sign any fine female pop singers during 66-8? Its great hearing the Orchids and April Young tracks from the source tapes rather than the worn 45 dubs I have heard the past couple years. Sound quality is excellent, though I'm disapointed with the Bootiques track - sounds like a vinyl 45 dub to my ears. Now I wish Mick & Malcolm could get the chance to raid and pillage the Bell/Amy/Mala (we NEED more Tracey Dey on legit CD!!!) and the Laurie vaults for simular comps! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 20:22:35 +0000 From: Ken Charmer Subject: Latest Newsletter Hi everyone The Frankie Valli and The Four Seasons Uk Historical Group have just published their latest free Newsletter (No 38) for March 2003 on the website http://www.btinternet.com/~seasonally Lots of old articles and comment Hope it is of interest. Chameleon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 20:45:11 -0000 From: Ken Silverwood Subject: Adam Faith/Dusty Lana Hello to all, I have posted to spectropop articles a poster from 1960 of Adam Faith headlining a "summer season " show with Emile Ford & The John Barry Seven. Further down the bill come "The Lana Sisters", who at the time featured the future Dusty Springfield, would she have been with them at this time June 1960. The season in this case was a period of 13 weeks twice nightly plus matinee's on a Tues & Thurs, so work that out. Here are some snippets from the rest of the obit. "His Blackpool performances earned Adam £1,000 per week , compared to £4 as a messenger boy for Rank Cinemas,what a night it was for young Adam Faith,the blue-eyed boy of today's record buying teenagers. Not only was it his opening night but also it was his 20th birthday." It appears he returned again in 1966 to star at the South Pier for the summer season. He was quoted as saying " I never really sang well enough to make a life profession out of it. I was successful at being a pop singer - that's different to being a good singer". Ken On The West Coast -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 16:33:32 -0600 From: Dan Hughes Subject: Re: Friend & Lover Matthew H. wrote: > Anyone have any info on the song > 'Reach Out in the Darkness' by Friend & Lover? Mick replied, > "Reach Out Of The Darkness" was a USA Top 10 hit for Friend > & Lover in 1968. The act comprised Jimmie David Post and his > wife Cathy. And I add, Jim Post was a famous Chicago folk singer who recorded several albums under his own name. Just last night I was talking to a guy who used to hang out at the Earl of Old Town (Chicago folk club in the 60s-70s) and he mentioned seeing Jim and Cathy perform there frequently. ---Dan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 23:13:08 -0000 From: Ken Silverwood Subject: Re: Lou Johnson's "(There's) Always Something There To Remind Me" Mick: > Is the Lou Johnson track available on a single disc, anyone? Yes Mick, I have a copy London American HLX 9917 b/w " Wouldn't That Be Something" A Giant-Baum-Kaye opus. Who were those guys? I have a lot of singles with their compositions on either "a" or "b" side. I also have a Lou Johnson "Best Of.." CD entitled "Sweet Southern (sic) Soul" it's on Marginal & has 18 sides from his Big Top & Big Hill days another 6 are probably late 60s. Oh and by the way I picked up a quite decent copy of Beverley Jones "Why Do Lovers----" recently for £3, I also noticed that her 4th single has her version of "Heatwave" as an "a" side, anyone heard that? As an aside what are the chances of another in the "Girls Will Be Girls" series on Westside, they were a good accompaniment to the "Early Girls" & "Where The Girls Are" series. Ken On The West Coast -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sat, 15 Mar 2003 22:09:10 -0600 From: Shawn Baldwin Subject: Re: Lou Johnson's "(There's) Always Something There To Remind Me" Mick Patrick said: > (Lou Johnson's) version of ("(There's) Always Something There To Remind > Me") is the original and without a doubt the best. You should hear Martha Reeves' version of the song, it really kicks butt! Shawn ps Dionne recently re-recorded the song for her latest cd -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 00:39:05 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Where The Girls Are Volume 5 The S'pop Team: > New at S'pop Recommends - Where The Girls Are, Volume 5 > "A CD that has clearly set the standard for girl group > compilations to come." Why, Miss Sheila B must surely be > referring to the latest addition to the "Where The Girls > Are" series! It appears she quite likes it. Click here to > find out why: http://www.spectropop.com/recommends/ Billy G Spradlin > I just got my copy of the CD last week and loving it. The > Jan Tanzy track was a nice surprise, did she cut any other > great singles? Did you read the booklet? You'll find that info there. > My only (little) gripe is that the CD turns very R&B/Soul > oriented in the middle of the CD... I like variety on my compilations and always include some soul tracks. Besides, doing that also widens the market. After all, if the CDs don't sell enough, there might be no further volumes. An entire CD of whiney white "Da Doo Ron Ron"-alikes would irritate me greatly. > It's great hearing the Orchids and April Young tracks from > the source tapes rather than the worn 45 dubs I have heard > the past couple years. Sound quality is excellent, though > I'm disappointed with the Bootiques track - sounds like a > vinyl 45 dub to my ears. Actually, the two Orchids' tracks are disc dubs. I shall inform the mastering engineer that you approve of his work. Sony could not (or would not) supply master tapes for the Orchids' and Bootiques' tracks, despite agreeing to license the cuts to Ace. They couldn't find them or, more likely, couldn't be bothered to look. Go figure. > Now I wish Mick & Malcolm could get the chance to raid and > pillage the Bell/Amy/Mala (we NEED more Tracey Dey on legit > CD!!!)... To date MB and I have included tracks by the lovely Tracey Dey on three legit CDs. The folk at Sundazed have a licensing deal with BMG for Bell/Amy/Mala material. Perhaps it's time a US label got involved in the girl-group reissue scene instead of leaving the job to us Brits. Howzabout it, Ephram? Glad you like the CD, Billy. MICK PATRICK PS: Dame Thora Hird R.I.P. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 11:21:08 +0300 From: Andres Andres Subject: Re: Bon Bons / Shangs Andres wrote: > There are some other recordings in existence that some attribute > to the Weiss and Ganser sisters, like What's Wrong With Ringo? by > the Bon Bons. Ian Chapman replied: > The Bon-Bons question was raised a couple of years ago here on > Spectropop. They were a group in their own right - if you take a > look in the Photos section in the Miscellaneous folder, their pic is > still there. Thanks for info, Ian. The only thing in question - why this strange rumor ever appeared?! If you use www.google.com and search for bon bons Shangri-Las you'll see that this confusion exists at many sites! Even on Spectropop (http://www.spectropop.com/gg/shangrilas.html) we read <>. Could it be that the Shangri-Las actually were the Bon-Bons for just a short period of time and at the same time another Bon-Bons existed too? Sorry, didn't read Mick's liner notes on the "Myrmidons of Melodrama" comp. Andres -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 16:24:59 -0800 (PST) From: David Coyle Subject: Re: Nino Tempo & April Stevens "Deep Purple" by Nino Tempo & April Stevens is one of my all-time favorite recordings ever -- not merely "'60s", "pop", or "duo" -- it's just a great song. But I can't seem to get interested enough in a whole Nino & April CD collection. I have "All Strung Out" on that White Whale compilation, it does nothing for me. I saw a Nino & April Scopitone on AMC once, along with a newsreel about them, and once again, nothing. It didn't help that the Scopitone was for a lame, cheezy version of "Land Of 1000 Dances". Am I missing out on something? Is there anything else enough like "Deep Purple" to reel me in? David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 01:03:43 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Lou Johnson / Beverley Jones Me: > Is Lou Johnson('s version of "(There's) Always Something > ere To Remind Me") available on a single disc, anyone? Ken: > Yes Mick, I have a copy London American HLX 9917 b/w > Wouldn't That Be Something" A Giant-Baum-Kaye opus. I meant on a single compact disc, as opposed to the Rhino three CD set. > I also have a Lou Johnson "Best Of.." CD entitled "Sweet > Southern (sic) Soul" it's on Marginal... Marginal CDs are bootlegs. I meant a legit single compact disc. > ...I picked up a quite decent copy of Beverley Jones "Why Do > Lovers..." recently for £3, I also noticed that her 4th single > has her version of "Heatwave" as an "a" side, anyone heard that? Beverley sings "Heatwave" fabulously well. However, the beat group-style backing grates. I love the b-side, though. > As an aside what are the chances of another in the "Girls Will > Be Girls" series on Westside, they were a good accompaniment > to the "Early Girls" & "Where The Girls Are" series. Unlikely! It's a while since Westside have released anything. There is no third volume of "Girls Will Be Girls" planned. MICK PATRICK -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Sun, 16 Mar 2003 17:12:17 -0800 (PST) From: David Coyle Subject: Re: Meet Me At Mary's Place Haven't heard the Springsteen version, but I read somewhere when the CD first came out that "Mary's Place" is either a ripoff or rewrite (depending on who you ask) of Sam Cooke's "Meet Me At Mary's Place", recorded for his SAR label in the early '60s. Dave -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 07:52:52 +0000 From: Simon White Subject: re: Downtown Honourable mention here for Frank Sinatra's version of "Downtown" on the "Strangers In The Night" album. Frank makes a noise, thus: "When you're alone, And life is making you lonely, You can always go, Eegghhhew, Downtown" I wonder whether it was a comment on the song particularly? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 18:46:49 +1030 From: Norman Subject: It's Not Easy by Normie Rowe Hi, going back a couple of weeks ago Phil Chapman posed the question about Normie Rowe's "It's Not Easy" > Does anyone know if Normie's is the original version of this > Brill Building song? The following is an extract from Normie's answer to the question; "It's Not Easy was picked from a series of demos played to me by a song plugger from Screen Gem - Columbia music in London in 1966. It had been written by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weill for the Righteous Brothers just before their 1966 break-up. I must've been the next person to hear it. I couldn't believe my ears when I heard the song originally. The Righteous Brothers were the first artistes to show me that white people could actually sing with the feelings usually associated with Afro- Americans from the Blues/Rhythm and Blues/Gospel genres which eventually led to the world explosion of so-called Soul Music of the sixties. Man and Weill had written most of the R.B.'s hits and I was one big fan of both teams. The orchestra on the recording was 36 piece which included John-Paul Jones and Jimmy Page, both of whom went on to form Led Zeppelin, The Ted Heath Band brass section, and a vocal group made up of singers from the Breakaways, and The Ivy League. Phil Dennys wrote the score. The production team of John Carter and Terry Kennedy were more than up to the task of producing a really fine recording. It's Not Easy was recorded at Advision in London's West End, on a four track Ĺ" Ampex machine in November of 1966. Bill Medley recorded It's Not Easy about 1970, and Dusty Springfield also had a go at it on an LP around the same time. ...Regards, Normie Rowe." Norman -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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