The Spectropop Group Archives presented by Friends of Spectropop

[Prev by Date] [Next by Date] [Index] [Search]

Spectropop - Digest Number 810



________________________________________________________________________
______________                                            ______________
______________                                            ______________
______________        S  P  E  C  T  R  O  P  O  P        ______________
______________                                            ______________
________________________________________________________________________
                        Jamie LePage (1953-2002)
                  http://www.spectropop.com/Jamie.htm
------------------------------------------------------------------------


------------------------------------------------------------------------

There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Telephone songs
           From: Eddy Smit 
      2. Re: More Superman-Related Requests
           From: Eddy Smit 
      3. Re: Telephone songs
           From: Mikey 
      4. Re: Telephone songs
           From: Bill Craig 
      5. Re: Telephone songs/Little Richard concert /What Is Rock And Roll
           From: Simon White 
      6. Re: Elvis' SunDays
           From: Mike Rashkow 
      7. Re: Telephone songs
           From: Andres Andres 
      8. Re: Telephone songs
           From: Frank 
      9. Re: Telephone songs
           From: Mike Edwards 
     10. Telephone songs
           From: Tony Waitekus  
     11. Little Richard TV commercial
           From: James Cassidy 
     12. Elvis after Sun
           From: Mike Edwards 
     13. Macca/slap-bass
           From: Stratton Bearheart 
     14. Re: Off The Hook
           From: Richard Havers 
     15. Re: Telephone songs
           From: Dan Hughes 
     16. Re: Telephone songs
           From: James Botticelli 
     17. Re: Off The Hook
           From: Simon White 
     18. Re: Elvis after Sun
           From: Richard Havers 
     19. Re: Macca/slap-bass
           From: Steve Harvey 
     20. RE: Elvis after Sun
           From: Robbie McCabe 
     21. More McCartney
           From: Alan Gordon 
     22. Re: Top Ten Rock 'n' Roll Tunes
           From: Peter McDonnell 
     23. Re: Tracey Dey
           From: Mike Miller 
     24. RE: Macca/slap-bass
           From: Robbie McCabe 
     25. Elvis' Package
           From: Steve Harvey 


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 1 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 07:52:17 +0100 From: Eddy Smit Subject: Re: Telephone songs Bill Craig > Has anyone mentioned The Stones "It's Off The Hook"? > Cool song. Did they write that? I can't remember. Yes, it's a Nanker-Phelge thing. Did we mention Blondie's Hanging on the telephone yet ? Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 08:04:26 +0100 From: Eddy Smit Subject: Re: More Superman-Related Requests And there's a Dutch group called Lois Lane. Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 07:54:01 -0500 From: Mikey Subject: Re: Telephone songs Andrew Jones: > We're probably coming close to ending the Telephone Songs > thread, but here's one last contribution: "Echo Valley > 2-6809," on Wayne Newton's "Daddy Don't You walk So Fast" > album. Yea, but it wasn't Wayne's song, it was first on The Partridge Family "Scrapbook" LP. BOTH LPs produced by Wes Farrel, that was the connection. Mikey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 12:58:46 -0000 From: Bill Craig Subject: Re: Telephone songs Bill Craig wrote: > Has anyone mentioned The Stones "It's Off The Hook"? > Cool song. Did they write that? I can't remember. Simon: > The first 45 I ever went out and bought with my own money ! Simon, Was that a single in the UK? A side or B side? Also, is it an original? Thanks B.C. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 13:41:52 +0000 From: Simon White Subject: Re: Telephone songs/Little Richard concert /What Is Rock And Roll Andrew Jones wrote: > And all this talk about "What is Rock & Roll?" and mentions > of Little Richard reminds me: The man himself is scheduled > to perform this weekend at a casino in a town near here. The > ads say it's gonna be one of his last concerts. Don't think > I'll be able to make it, though. Andrew I'm soooooo jealous. Try and get to see him ,he still puts on a mean performance and knocks his contemporaries for seven [one more than six]. And he's still pretty. I've kept quiet on the subject until now because I'm totally biased on the subject of Ricardo Wayne Penniman and have to bite nearly all the way through my tongue when I read anything that approaches criticism - Louis Jordan indeed! ;-) For me Richard is the be all and end all. He makes my big toe shoot up in my boot. He makes me go UUUHH and he makes me go OOOOH. My interest in music started with him at four years old when 'Heebie Jeebies' was my favorite song and it hasn't dimmed in forty years. My ten Desert Island Discs would be nine by the Georgia Peach and Jackie Lee's "The Duck" for variety. To bring the Telephone Game full circle, the first song I mentioned in the posting that prompted all these long distance calls was 'Every Night About This Time' by The Upsetters who were Richard's backing band and featured Mr Penniman incognito on vocals during his first gospel retirement. Where did Rock and Roll start? The same place it ended.... Little Richard. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 08:46:06 EST From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Elvis' SunDays Steve Harvey: > Love the Sun stuff, but Elvis never did anything like > "Heartbreak Hotel" before or afterwards. I wouldn't carp with Heartbreak Hotel, not bad at all and very unique record, but c'mon..."cryin all the time" "never caught a rabbit". Give me a personal break - that is weak. RCA cleaned him up, brushed him off, took away his soul and made him acceptable to THE PARENTS of white American girls. That is what they wanted and that is what they got. His Sun sides are classics; world shaking and paradigm defining. These things are very subjective, I respect your viewpoint, but I disagree and I would like to hear from some others on the issue - this is getting more interesting. Return To Sender, Teddy Bear, Jailhouse Rock, etc. etc. Fluff for the masses. I think it is enlightening that when he was on Sun, no one was sure if he was black or white and he was getting play on R&B stations and made the "Sepia" charts. That wasn't ever the case after they shipped him to the New York boys. Who was his producer on RCA? If the records were great everyone would know that. I don't. Respectfully, Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 16:49:29 +0300 From: Andres Andres Subject: Re: Telephone songs I think ALL I'VE GOT TO DO by The Beatles from the "With The Beatles" LP wasn't mentioned yet. Andres -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 15:06:16 +0100 From: Frank Subject: Re: Telephone songs Another last one : Bobby Darin : "Was There A Call?" Frank -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 09:11:56 -0500 From: Mike Edwards Subject: Re: Telephone songs David Bell writes: > Just thought of Little Miss Dynamite's "Ring A My Phone". > Great early track from the diminutive songstress." With the second name he has, I imagine nobody knows telephone songs better than David. A member recently mentioned the girl who was asking her Dad could she have a 'phone in her room. That was Robin Clark's "Daddy, Daddy" (Capitol, 1961), which was reissued on one of the A-side girl group compilations from Japan in the mid 90s. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 06:22:56 -0800 From: Tony Waitekus Subject: Telephone songs How about "I Don't Love You No More" by Jimmy Norman. Tony Waitekus WHTS/All Hit 98-9 -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 09:12:19 -0500 From: James Cassidy Subject: Little Richard TV commercial Perhaps I'm a little dense, but I don't "get" the Sprint PCS TV commercial currently running in the States that features Little Richard. For those of you who haven't seen it, the scene takes place in a bowling alley where members of a bowling team are apparently playing or practicing. Little Richard appears as himself, dressed in the bowling team's uniform. He cries out ("Good golly, Miss Molly!") that the shirt and shoes are not his. Someone with a Sprint PCSvision phone (w/built-in digital camera) takes a picture of him, and talks to the person receiving it on the other end. The spot ends with LR crying out "Who took the picture of Little Richard?" What's the gag here - that Little Richard would be on a bowling team? That he's embarrassed to be caught on camera wearing a bowling team shirt? Both? Neither? I'm flummoxed. Jim Cassidy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 15:05:25 -0000 From: Mike Edwards Subject: Elvis after Sun One of the old chestnuts that keeps getting trotted out whenever the history of Rock & Roll is discussed is that Elvis didn't make any good recordings after he left Sun Records. Not true. While the quality of his records declined after 1963, the material he put out in the six or seven preceding years was as good as anything that came out of the radio. He used: --Top quality writers: Pomus-Shuman, Leiber-Stoller, Otis Blackwell, Don Robertson etc --Legendary session musicians, studios and producers --The best back-up vocalists of their day, the Jordanaires. He spawned imitators, one of whom, Ral Donner, had a pretty credible career in his own right. I do not give an opinion on this (humble or otherwise) as the facts speak for themselves. Elvis sold boatloads of records all over the world during this period Mike Edwards (whose broken heart is still for sale) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 16:19:41 -0000 From: Stratton Bearheart Subject: Macca/slap-bass Bill Black's instrument was played by McCartney in the documentary for Paul's "Flaming Pie" album. He sang a snippet from "Heartbreak Hotel" and slapped the aforementioned bass with a degree of competence. Stratton Bearhart -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 20:06:53 +0000 From: Richard Havers Subject: Re: Off The Hook Bill Craig† wrote: > Has anyone mentioned The Stones "It's Off The Hook"? > Cool song. Did they write that? I can't remember. The Stones 5th UK single was Little Red Rooster b/w Off The Hook (Decca F.12014). It came out on Friday 13 November 1964. Both songs were recorded 2 September 1964 at Regent Sound studios . Produced by Andrew Oldham, Engineered by Bill Farley It made No.1 for 1 week. It is credited to Nanker Phelge, the name adopted by the Stones when the whole group shared in the writing royalties (a rare event). Dave Thompson was at the session on September 2. Known to the band as Scottish Dave as he had met them when they toured in Scotland. He moved to London and ended up living in Brianís flat. "I did some lyrics for that, like 'Phone disconnected cause she couldn't pay the bill', and Bill said 'Why not make it Unpaid bill'" Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 14:00:10 -0600 From: Dan Hughes Subject: Re: Telephone songs Howsabout Dr. Hook's first hit single Sylvia's Mother, and (from the Mothers of Invention debut album) Suzie Creamcheese (What's Got Into You)? --Dan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 15:27:27 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Telephone songs Frank: > Another last one : > Bobby Darin : "Was There A Call?" Bobby Darin: "If A Man Answers (your phone, then honey we're through)" -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 20:57:22 +0000 From: Simon White Subject: Re: Off The Hook Bill Craig wrote: > Simon, Was that a single in the UK? A side or B side? > Also, is it an original? 'Twas indeed. The 'A' was 'Little Red Rooster' which is the side I bought really. I was very young and liked the idea it was about a chicken. I thought of it as an aural cartoon with the dogs howling in the farmyard and such. I was 7 I reckon. I liked 'Off The Hook' more in the end. I bought "19th Nervous Breakdown" later too because it sounded like a proper Rock And Roll record to me. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 20:30:25 +0000 From: Richard Havers Subject: Re: Elvis after Sun Mike Edwards wrote: > One of the old chestnuts that keeps getting trotted out > whenever the history of Rock & Roll is discussed is that > Elvis didn't make any good recordings after he left Sun > Records. > Not true. While the quality of his records declined after > 1963, the material he put out in the six or seven preceding > years was as good as anything that came out of the radio. Hear Hear!! He even made some good ones after '63. 'From Elvis in Memphis' for one. Now before anyone takes issue with me, it's just my opinion and the only opinion that counts when it comes to saying what one likes and what one doesn't is one's own. Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 16:18:46 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Macca/slap-bass Stratton Bearheart wrote: > Bill Black's instrument was played by McCartney in > the documentary for Paul's "Flaming Pie" album. He sang > a snippet from "Heartbreak Hotel" and slapped the > aforementioned bass with a degree of competence. I'll have to search that one out. I never knew he could slapbass. Wonder if he taught himself or had somebody show him (and who?). As Van would say, "thanks for the information". -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 18:43:28 -0500 From: Robbie McCabe Subject: RE: Elvis after Sun Mike Edwards: >One of the old chestnuts that keeps getting trotted out >whenever the history of Rock & Roll is discussed is that >Elvis didn't make any good recordings after he left Sun >Records. >Not true. While the quality of his records declined after >1963, the material he put out in the six or seven preceding >years was as good as anything that came out of the radio. I think the problem is that with Elvis, many feel that once Col. Parker got a hold of him and signed him to RCA, that he "sold out" by taming his sexuality and making him more presentable to Mom and Dad. (Although Elvis being shown on TV from the waist up singing something as benign as "Teddy Bear" caused such a ruckus, imagine if he had been singing something like "Baby, Let's Play House"?). I don't think it was so much the decline of his music that contributes to this myth, it is the fact that Elvis was becoming "safe". The guy that your daughters were hot for was becoming a squeaky clean Mama's boy. The sales do point to his immense popularity, but his street cred (to use a punk/alternative music fan phrase) was shot to hell courtesy of Col. Tom. Rob -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 13:52:14 -0800 From: Alan Gordon Subject: More McCartney Steve Harvey: > What made McCartney's bass patterns so great were the chord > progressions of his songs.... Steve sir, With a great deal of respect, I disagree, sorta. My impression of Paul's basic playing, on all of the instruments that he was quite proficient on, was that his playing served the song the same way a great writer or actor or director or cinematographer, etc., serves the story. It seems to me that his playing on his own songs was a just a wee bit more perfunctory than on George's or John's. ( But that may be because, most of the time he didn't write his own songs on bass.) I've always felt that what made the Beatles great was the strong sense of competition between them. Paul may have played more elaborately on his fellow Beatle's songs to leave his bass-playing mark on an already great song. Some of which had very pedestrian or even uncreative chord patterns. But, in my humble estimation, it's not what you build things with, but rather how you build it. "Rain", for instance, is fairly typical of your basic 3-chord Rock/Blues/Pop progression ( I IV V ) in the key of "G." Fairly basic, except that John holds the high "D" and "G" notes through all three chords... a folk "trick". But the bass playing... good lord. Probably my favorite "psychedelic" musical experience... and I never took acid. As a young punk I used to play the right channel of the stereo version at pretty extreme volumes in my "rigged" headphones, to get another experience of the music that I loved. I had home-made a very amateur mixing apparatus, so besides the normal "mix", I could listen to either of the stereo tracks with both ears in my headphones, or even play them with flipped phase which would sometimes cancel out the instruments and voices in the dead-center. > The Beatles stuff traveled in and out of keys. While this is technically right, I never really heard most of those songs as having modulations. But that's probably because Paul was so amazingly adept at weaving these gorgeous/rockin' melodies that were so seamless in his choice of notes, that they never seemed to change keys. I think most people hear changes like whole step 2 chord progressions (Bo Diddley, early Kinks, Fleetwood Mac's "Dreams," etc.) as being very melodic. The same goes for the inclusion of Major II and VI chords in 3 or 4 chord progressions. And I think The Beatles are instrumental in our acceptance of these tonalities... but that's probably because Paul grew up on those wonderful show tunes of the 40s and 50s. > When recording Macca always put the bass on last so the chord > progression some what dictated his choice of bass notes. This is certainly "mostly" true, after a certain period, but a song like "Come Together" was virtually live in the studio, and would probably be not much more than a cool rip off of a 3 chord Chuck Berry song, if not for the arrangement and the amazing bass line. > Interesting songs make interesting bass patterns. 'Tis true... but the inverse is also very true. I also respectfully disagree with Mr. Bearheart. I think Paul is every bit as good as all of the players you mentioned (as I am listening to "If I Needed Someone" on San Francisco radio station The Drive). I also think Paul's playing, even on The Beatles earliest records was only remotely "tea chest bass" style (I assume you mean rudimentary bass-work like playing the root then dropping to the V). Although Paul was obviously (and admittedly) very influenced by Brian Wilson's playing, he was getting pretty "lyrical" and wild (Rain etc. May 1966) before Pet Sounds (May 1966) peace, albabe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 13:15:17 -0800 From: Peter McDonnell Subject: Re: Top Ten Rock 'n' Roll Tunes My Top Ten Rock n' Roll tunes: 1. Boom Boom--John Lee Hooker 2. Mess Around--Ray Charles 3. Who Do You Love?--Bo Diddley 4. Smokestack Lightning--Howlin' Wolf 5. Train Kept A-Rollin'--Johnny Burnette 6. Long Tall Sally--Little Richard 7. Maybelline--Chuck Berry 8. Blue Suede Shoes--Carl Perkins 9. Summertime Blues--Eddie Cochran 10.Whole Lot Of Shakin' Goin' On--Jerry Lewis Sorry, I can't put Elvis on this list. He was the greatest, but I can't find the one song of his that would make the list. friscopedro -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 16:31:35 -0500 From: Mike Miller Subject: Re: Tracey Dey Hello all, I believe that you can get in touch with Tracey Dey. I once looked on the internet, and a found she lived in Canada, I think it was near Toronto, and she was working in the business world. She had even sung at a convention or special meeting that was held in whatever field she is working in. I hope you can make contact. she had a very good voice, and it is a shame that she never had that "one big hit". It is too bad that so many artists from this period did not make it bigger. Certainly some of her material was top-notch and she had very strong production at least for a while. Some of her best was "Jealous Eyes", "Hangin' On To My Baby", "Blue Turns To Grey", "Gonna Get Along Without You Now", "I Won't Tell" and my personal favorite, "Any Kind Of Love" Mike Miller -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 18:45:22 -0500 From: Robbie McCabe Subject: RE: Macca/slap-bass Stratton Bearheart: >Bill Black's instrument was played by McCartney in the >documentary for Paul's "Flaming Pie" album. He sang a >snippet from "Heartbreak Hotel" and slapped the aforementioned >bass with a degree of competence. I believe Sir Paul also used that bass on the sessions for "Free As A Bird" and "Real Love". I do remember seeing him playing a stand up bass in the "Real Love" video. Rob -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Thu, 06 Mar 2003 16:33:05 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Elvis' Package Well Mike, to each his own. Sure Sam Phillips is better known than the RCA cats (Steve Sholes - producer or just the guy who signed him to RCA?) who produced him. Sam Phillips' label was a pioneering label back in the day (along with Chess, Atlantic, Specialty). I think he's known for all the people he discovered more than as a producer. To me the magic of the Sun sides Elvis did is more the Blue Moon Boys than Sam. After all, they were the ones who were fooling around when Sam hit record. There is lots of music I like where I couldn't tell you the producer. Doesn't mean they are any less enjoyable. As for the RCA stuff I seem to recall a number of his hits (All Shook Up, Don't Be Cruel, Return To Sender and my fav, non-hit, Paralyzed) were written by a black writer by the name of Otis Blackwell. Do you think that Sam Phillips wasn't packaging a sound for the white audience when he did the 5 Sun singles? What is soulful is a debatable thing. I know some mistaken souls that have told me Hank Williams wasn't soulful. I know better. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
End

Click here to go to The Spectropop Group
Spectropop text contents © copyright 2002 Spectropop unless stated otherwise. All rights in and to the contents of these documents, including each element embodied therein, is subject to copyright protection under international copyright law. Any use, reuse, reproduction and/or adaptation without written permission of the owners is a violation of copyright law and is strictly prohibited. All rights reserved.