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Spectropop - Digest Number 808



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______________        S  P  E  C  T  R  O  P  O  P        ______________
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                        Jamie LePage (1953-2002)
                  http://www.spectropop.com/Jamie.htm
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: What Is Rock & Roll?
           From: Alan Gordon 
      2. Re: Hank Ballard
           From: Mike Rashkow 
      3. Re: McCartney
           From: Steve Harvey 
      4. Re: "What is rock and roll?"
           From: TD 
      5. Re: Thomas Fritsch
           From: Mark Wirtz 
      6. More Superman-Related Requests
           From: Rex Strother 
      7. Re: What Is Rock & Roll?
           From: Richard Gagnon 
      8. Re: Ronnie Dante (with Vance & Pockriss)
           From: Jeff Lemlich 
      9. Bonnie, SAR, more
           From: Country Paul 
     10. Tracey Dey
           From: Rosemarie Edwards 
     11. Re: Telephone songs
           From: Bill Craig 
     12. Re: Question for Artie Wayne
           From: Artie Wayne 
     13. Re: He'll Have To Go
           From: David Coyle 
     14. Re: Early Rock n' Roll
           From: Stratton Bearhart 
     15. McCartney
           From: Stratton Bearheart 
     16. Re: Hank Ballard
           From: Scott Bauman 
     17. Re: Hank Ballard
           From: Peter Lerner 
     18. Re: Hank Ballard
           From: Guy Lawrence 
     19. Re: McCartney
           From: Richard Havers 
     20. Re: What Is Rock & Roll?
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     21. Re: What Is Rock & Roll?
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     22. Jeff Barry/The Spartans
           From: Stuffed Animal 
     23. Re: Telephone songs
           From: David Bell 
     24. Re: More Superman-Related Requests
           From: Phil Milstein 
     25. Re: Ronnie Dante (with Vance & Pockriss)
           From: Mike Rashkow 


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Message: 1 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 17:04:59 -0800 From: Alan Gordon Subject: Re: What Is Rock & Roll? > From: Mike Rashkow > Subject: WHAT IS ROCK AND ROLL? You tell me. As per usual, a great dissertation, sir. There is a book that came out in '92 called "What Was The First Rock 'N' Roll Record? that is pretty darn interesting as an historical treatise. It doesn't really name a specific song, more it offers 50 choices and many whys and wherefores for each. It leaves it up to the reader to draw his/her conclusions from the "facts". As for my opinion: I have a love/hate relationship with labeling music. It's fun, but in the end just an exercise in frustration for me. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 20:43:48 EST From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Hank Ballard Simon writes: > Sad to hear of Hank Ballard's passing ...without his version of > The Twist there would be no Chubby Checker, Cameo wouldn't have > gone in the direction they did which means no Dee Dee Sharp, Orlons > etc. The knock on effect of that is possibly no Gamble and Huff > and the repercussions of that are too awful to even think about! Puff Daddy, all this is true furshure: and long, long before The Twist, The Midnighters upset America with things like "Work With me Annie" and the follow up, "Annie Had A Baby"..(can't work no more). Both banned on many stations. From that period I liked their "House On The Hill". The problem with getting older is that more of one's heroes and friends keep dying. Rashkovksy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 18:01:14 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: McCartney What made McCartney's bass patterns so great were the chord progressions of his songs. The Beatles stuff traveled in and out of keys. When recording Macca always put the bass on last so the chord progression somewhat dictated his choice of bass notes. Interesting songs make interesting bass patterns. The guys in the 50s had it rough with the same old chord progressions, rarely straying out of the same key. He is a great player. Would love to hear him play some slapbass on Bill Black's old upright (which Linda bought him for a birthday present). -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 00:01:01 -0500 From: TD Subject: Re: "What is rock and roll?" Ten Seminal Rock and Roll Records 1. Bill Haley and the Comets - Rock Around the Clock The song meets Chuck Berry's requirements--Its got a back-beat you can't lose it! The guitar solo is the benchmark of Rock and Roll guitar solos--12 bars of dynamite. What separates rock-and- roll from country-and-western and from Kansas City jump starts with Bill Haley and the Comets. I don't care if the words rock- and-roll are found in a letter from George Washington to Martha, what rock and roll music sounds like starts with Bill Haley's "Rock Around the Clock". 2. Elvis Presley - Heartbreak Hotel When Heartbreak Hotel started climbing the music charts, the question was What kind of music is that?--the answer was Rock and Roll. When Elvis was with Sun, he was playing road house music and cat music. After Heartbreak Hotel, it was called Rock and Roll. Elvis out-sobs Johnny Ray (the Nabob of Sob) and Scotty Moore blasts a lead that gave millions of people who had never heard Willie Johnson with Howlin Wolf or Pat Hare their first taste of Memphis aggresive guitar. 3. Bo Diddley - Bo Diddley Rhythm 'n Reverb! Before 1955, it was hambone, patting juba, and, afterward, it was doing the Bo Diddley. The Everly Brothers added a little Bo Diddley strum to Bye Bye Love (added a little rock and roll to a country and western honky-tonk song) and it wasn't a country and western song anymore. Bo Diddley is the source for Buddy Holly's Not Fade Away, the first hit for The Rolling Stones, the world's greatest rock and roll band. 4. Little Richard - Lucille --that one-beat tempo and frantic vocal! 5. Fats Domino - Ain't That a Shame --rhythm piano and dialect. 6. The Coasters - Poison Ivy the metaphor! 7. The Chantels - Maybe --the girl groups--not even a hint of jazz.... 8. Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers - Why Do Fools Fall in Love ...it's the seminal moment for do wop 9. Chuck Berry - Oh Carol ...Chuck Berry has so many great songs, but the topic is who/ what defines the genre. I am missing a literary opportunity by suggesting Oh Carol rather than School Day (otherwise known as Hail, Hail, Rock and Roll), but Oh, Carol has the clever lyrics, the stops, the piano, and the Chuck Berry Johnny B. Goode guitar chops. 10. Jerry Lee Lewis - "Great Balls of Fire" ...written by Otis Blackwell (who also wrote All Shook Up and Don't Be Cruel)... produced in Memphis by Sam Phillips at Sun (who produced Howlin' Wolf, Elvis, and Johnny Cash)... sung by the world's most imitated piano player TD -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 23:06:56 -0500 From: Mark Wirtz Subject: Re: Thomas Fritsch > Anyone know anything about this guy? Regarding Thomas Fritsch (with a name like that you GOT to be good! LOL), allow me to put in my piece: Mark F: > I can't offer any more information than can be gleaned from > comments by Mark W. He was apparently pretty well known in > Germany at the time Mark was asked to do arrangements for two > of his LPs. Nils Noboch was the producer and from the sound of > it quite a competent one at that. The recording facilities in > Germany must have been light years ahead of the US and UK > because the sound of the records is really amazing.... *** Well, well, well, if this doesn't prove the adage that "one man's meat is another man's poison", I don't know what does. You see, the sound of the Thomas Fritsch recordings (and other things recorded at EMI/Electrola's fabled Cologne studios - a perennially awarded classical facility), is the very reason why, at EMI's Abbey Road "sister studio", Syd Barrett, Paul McCartney, Norman Smith, Geoff Emerick and I had to battle so very hard to "get rid of THAT sound", and get a more gritty, gutsy "US" sound! Allow me to bore you with technicalities... EMI studios (by convention) recorded in the CCIR curve at 30 ips (extremely clean, soft "antiseptic" middle, very airy high end, very deep, round, soft, low bottom end, but no "intenstines." PERFECT for classical recording! EMI/Electrola went one step further and not only used BASF tape (highly sensitive, alas, abrasively burning expensive recording "heads" at the rate of logs in a fire place) mastered all their vinyl "mothers" at 16 rpm (Abbey Road didn't quite go that far, but didn't win as many classical awards as Electrola either). Now, for most part, US studios, and most independent UK, London studios of note (i.e. the legendary "Olympic Sound" and "IBC" studios), lined up their machines to the NAB curve - lowered high end, lifted extreme bottom, and much more "belly" and "skin." In other words, a far "sexier" sound. If you want a clear example of the difference, listen to the Beatles' Abbey Road stuff, then compare it with their "Trident Studios" recordings (most of the White album and "Hey Jude") when they were finally allowed to record outside of Abbey Road. Irony of ironies was that Ken Scott, a virtual "relief pitcher" engineer at Abbey Road, whom - I am ashamed to admit - we used to make fun of, rose to great heights when he quit EMI and went to work for Trident, where he not only engineered but produced "classics" like David Bowie, Queen and - whoa!!! - Supertramp (Ken's "Crime Of The Century" production is, to me, the best produced and engineered pop-rock album EVER). But, hey, let's go all the way. When Spector worked at Abbey Road on George Harrison's "All Things Must Pass" album, it was initially a total disaster, because - believe me - it was virtually impossible to get a true "Spector Sound" with the CCIR curve! Burgeoning audio genius. Alan Parsons saved the day (he had worked on both of my Spector tributes, by the way, as a tape jockey, and learned, LOL) when he took over and got as close to Spector's vision as was humanly possible under the circumstances. I don't know what Alan did exactly, all I know is that the only way I was able to pull off my "Spector" efforts, was by "bastardizing" the pristine Abbey Road sound by recording at 7.5 ips!!! (Prior to my EMI tenure, I had no trouble at all producing my most Spectoresque effort of all, Dany Chandelle's "Lying Awake", at Bond Street's small "Oriole" studios with dynamite engineer Mike Ross. Oriole was later bought out by CBS, then Sony, and Mike is still with the company, having engineered many, many UK hits and classics). In those early days, Mike and I (often in the company of Kim Fowley) were like kids building and then playing in a tree house. Even though, once I joined EMI, Geoff Emerick and I became (and still are) like brothers-in-sound, Geoff always was and still is Paul (McCartney)'s "guy". Conversely,Mike was, and in spirit always remained "mine." I would love nothing more than to one day again walk up to a board with him and work like we did on "Touch Of Velvet" and all those goodies that built the foundation of my career. As a final note on this particular segue, I must state that it was Phil Chapman who not only most brilliantly, but creatively, succeeded in not only emulating, but surpassing the Spector sound at Olympic Studios, putting my efforts, as well as those of my then UK colleagues to shame. Phil Ch. not only captured the essence of the sound, but infused it with a breathtaking viscera that even Spector wasn't capable of (and the lack of which I believe to have been the real reason for the demise of his once characteristic concept). Flash-back to the actual topic of this address and closing my verbose circle - back to Thomas Fritsch. It so happens that one of the tracks Thomas and Nils and I cut together was a cover of - "You've Lost That Lovin' Feeling" (on which I even took over the piano chores, because the local session guy booked to play the part must have thought this was a polka). And - it sucks. I never got involved in sound matters during these Cologne sessions, having my job cut out arranging and conducting the charts with the "Schlager Fritzen" musicians. Whatever. Just a bunch of echo does not make a Spector sound-alike record make... Patrick Grant, I admire you for your courage to admit in public that you liked Thomas Fritsch's records. Thomas was actually very talented and wonderful to work with; an absolute professional; and as charming as he appeared (hey - he had the "hair" and the "image" long before David Hasselhof or Mel Gibson!). So, if you want to know anything else about him, feel free to e-mail me, or ask on the board. I'd be happy to tell you. (If, by any chance at all, you have also heard of "Connie" Froboess - Nils Nobach produced her and co-wrote most of her many hits with Rudi Lind - all I can say is that I used to have a major crush on her and I "hated" Thomas for actually having scored her, and I used to "jealously" tease the crap out of him for it, LOL. > As to the music, well, I have a tough time with German language > pop as it is. **Indeed. One really remarkable exception to that, however, is the work of "(Muenchener) Freiheit," to me one of the very best harmony pop groups ever (and darn good material to boot!). Do yourself a favor - check 'em out. In fact, "ease" into them by getting their original English version, Abbey Road recorded, "Fantasie" LP, and you might be happily amazed. How can ANY pop fan resist "Keeping The Dream Alive"??? Now I'm gonna shut up! Best, Mark Wirtz P.S. Hey, come and visit me at my web site again sometime, would ya? I need the web hits to brag! LOL. http://www.markwirtz.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 22:18:44 -0700 From: Rex Strother Subject: More Superman-Related Requests Spectropoppers, the list of Superman songs is going very good; I appreciate all the help (some great obscure ones). It came to me that I should possibly expand my request using keywords like: "Metropolis", "Daily Planet", "Kryptonite", "Man of Steel", "Fortress of Solitude" and "Lois Lane" ("Lex Luthor" anyone?) Anyone game to continue the search? Rex -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 00:30:05 -0500 From: Richard Gagnon Subject: Re: What Is Rock & Roll? Shawn writes: > Big Momma Thornton should be the the #1 influence in Rock and > Roll her song is first Rock and Roll song. Little Richard should > be #2 and the King of Rock and Roll. With all due respect, nah. There isn't a thing Little Richard did in the Fifties that Louis Jordan wasn't doing a decade earlier. Try listening to "Caldonia" (also known as "Caldonia Boogie"). If you're going to give the title to a woman, you'd probably be better off handing the crown over to, say, Memphis Minnie. Big Mama's "Hound Dog" wasn't much of a rocker, frankly. Elvis made it one. Maybe the world thinks that rock and roll began with Bill Haley's "Rock around the clock", but this being Spectropop, I don't have to give anyone a history lesson...not that I could! Seminal recordings? Here's a few contenders: I want to Rock and Roll ------- Scatman Crothers (40s) Saturday Night Fish Fry ------- Louis Jordan (1949) Good Rocking Ronight ---------- Wynonie Harris (1947) Rock Awhile ------------------- Goree Carter (1949) Rockin' the house ------------- Memphis Slim (1947) Rock Little Baby -------------- Cecil Gant (1951) Rock the joint boogie --------- Big Joe Turner (194?) We're gonna rock -------------- Wild Bill Moore (1947) House near the railroad track - Tommy Brown (1951) Sausage Rock ------------------ Doc Sausage (1950) Regarding Telephone songs, did anyone mention "Woman to woman" by Shirley Brown? And Superman is mentioned (or maybe it's the archetype) in Tony Romeo's "Blessed is the rain". That's all! Rick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 05:40:24 -0000 From: Jeff Lemlich Subject: Re: Ronnie Dante (with Vance & Pockriss) Laura Pinto wrote: > A few years later, the team of Vance/Pockriss would also > bring us a group called the Cuff Links and a Top-Ten hit > called "Tracy." The debut LP was also entitled "Tracy," and > the "Cuff Links" initially were just one guy overdubbing his > vocals some eight or nine times. That guy, of course, was > Ron Dante! Dante sang lead on another Vance/Pockriss project around the same time, THE TWO DOLLAR QUESTION: Aunt Matilda's Double Yummy Blow Your Mind Out Brownies/ Cincinnati Love Song (Intrepid 75001) The A-side is a tribute to some "mmm mmm good" brownies (with a certain extra ingredient) that just happened to be popular at "Alice's Restaurant". The flip is just as interesting. It would later be recorded for the Epic label by Michael "my name is Michael, I've got a nickel" Vance. Vance's record was retitled "Michael's Love Song", with some lyric changes (including a biting dog that didn't score many points in the playground in Michael's mind). I heard a story that the female voice on David Geddes' "Run Joey Run" was also one of Paul Vance's sons. Any truth to this? Jeff Lemlich http://www.limestonerecords.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 01:37:36 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Bonnie, SAR, more To all involved: Thank you for the Bonnie/Charlotte O'Hara pages! As her "Close Your Eyes" has become a favorite of mine, having recently discovered it, I took special interest in the compilation of articles. I never knew "Close Your Eyes" was on WB - thanks for the scan! (Also check the link to Phil Milsteins article on Charlotte O'Hara at AS/PMA: http://www.aspma.com/news.htm#bonnie If that doesn't get you directly to it, the article is 9 items down on the news page.) All this plus the Galens, too! Bob Rashkow wrote, "I've never heard The Valentinos." They didn't get airplay on that many pop stations when they were new. I don't know if there are any albums, but the two-disc "Sam Cooke's SAR Records Story" on Abkco is worth chasing down. Their biggest songs are there, plus much more amazing soul, gospel and pop. Cooke expected from his artists what he delivered himself: top quality performance, production and lyrical enunciation. One can only imagine what he and Jesse Belvin would have done if they'd lived. Both these men were remarkable artists, writers and producers, who truly shone in a studio. In a way I think of them as "the black Phil Spector and Brian Wilson" - though I don't know who would be who in that comparison! And the other Rahkow "brother", Mike: "As for me, I'm stuck on Alison Krauss and Union Station." I join you, and highly recommend "New Favorite", the excellent CD and heartbreaking title song. Spectropop goes 2000s down a country road. Paul Urbahns asked about Canadian information. A good starting place is http://www.1050chum.com homepage of Canada's biggest oldies network. Interesting stuff about them, plus good links. Happy surfing! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 11:16:39 -0000 From: Rosemarie Edwards Subject: Tracey Dey Could anyone help ...does anyone know how we can contact Tracey Dey. This is an extract from a recent post from Eddie Rambeau - from our fan club site... "As for Tracey Dey...she is one of the sweetest people I've met in the business. I loved her to death and would love to get in touch with her to see how she's doing. If anyone out there knows how to get in touch with Tracey, please let me know or let her know I'm trying to get in touch with her." Lots of Love Rosemarie hppt://www.edrambeau.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 13:23:56 -0000 From: Bill Craig Subject: Re: Telephone songs Has anyone mentioned The Stones "It's Off The Hook"? Cool song. Did they write that? I can't remember. Bill Craig -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 05:42:15 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Question for Artie Wayne Mikey.........I'm sorry , but I don't know anything about any of the cuts on the Brian Hyland album "The Joker went Wild" except for "3000" miles which was cut in NY. regards, Artie Wayne -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 07:11:38 -0800 (PST) From: David Coyle Subject: Re: He'll Have To Go I am certainly impressed by the lengthy "revisiting" of the classic Jim Reeves hit "He'll Have To Go." I had never thought too much of how Reeves's deceptively smooth crooning made all evidence of illicit sexual relations sound non-existent. While I don't particularly subscribe to the idea that Reeves's version is BETTER because of its "country-white" diction, I can believe that the sexual undertones would probably sound more prevalent in a classic soul singer's version, particularly since soul and R&B has always been dripping with sex and passion. A while back I read somewhere where somebody mentioned "M.T.A." by the Kingston Trio, and said that there was a more sinister sad undertone to that song as well. The song talks about a guy who is stuck riding the Boston subway because the fare was increased by a nickel while he was on it, so the conductor told him he couldn't disembark. The last verse talks about how the guy's wife comes to the station every day at lunchtime and hands him a sandwich. The writer made a good point -- why didn't the guy's wife just give him the nickel so he could get off the train?? Could it be because she didn't WANT him to come home? Much less get to work? Tragic... Someone ought to write a book about all these classic songs with hidden meanings. It didn't just start in the bubblegum era with the Ohio Express singing about having love in their tummy... David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 19:17:42 -0000 From: Stratton Bearhart Subject: Re: Early Rock n' Roll Strange as this association might seem, I think there's a definate thread between R&R and these sources:- Scott Joplin - Elite Syncopations (1908) Claude Debussy - Le Petit Negre (1909) And what an association in itself!. Stratton Bearhart -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 19:26:41 -0000 From: Stratton Bearheart Subject: McCartney Actually McCartney Bass playing only became sonic once he changed from the stylistic "tea chest bass" he produced from the Hofner to the Rickenbacker sound around 66'. He was envious of bass sounds he heard on soul records, Duck Dunn would be an example, and, he loved the dexterity of James Jamerson and Carol Kaye on Motown records. Most of all he aspired to the magic of Brian Wilson's lyrical bass lines, and Sgt Pepper is full of them. McCartney belongs to a number of great bass players, not quite so innovative as the people he admired who came before him and a figure of inspiration to players after him such as Chris Squire of Yes, Kenny Gradney of Little Feat and the plethora of jazz/rock musicians who pushed the envelope further in years to come. Stratton Bearhart -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 20:49:05 +0000 From: Scott Bauman Subject: Re: Hank Ballard Several years ago, I attended a Brian Wilson in-store appearance at Tower Records in Hollywood. While walking through the parking lot I saw none other than Hank Ballard. I didn't know him personally, but I introduced myself and asked him what he was doing at a Brian Wilson in-store. He told me that he was there to "pay respects to the master." I never would have guessed that Hank Ballard was a Brian Wilson fan! I also remember that he was very gracious and told me about all of the projects that he was working on at the time. -- Scott -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 22:45:21 -0000 From: Peter Lerner Subject: Re: Hank Ballard I want to join in the tributes to Hank. I love the raunchy 50s material and the 60s dance craze stuff, but there's a special place in my collection for a thoughtful and sensitive 70s southern soul 45 of Kris Kristofferson's "Sunday morning comin' down". And I didn't know that Hank was Florence Ballard's cousin till I read the obituary in the London Times today. Peter -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 22:59:17 -0000 From: Guy Lawrence Subject: Re: Hank Ballard Simon White wrote: > Sad to hear of Hank Ballard's passing ...without his version of > The Twist there would be no Chubby Checker, Cameo wouldn't have > gone in the direction they did which means no Dee Dee Sharp, Orlons > etc. The knock on effect of that is possibly no Gamble and Huff > and the repercussions of that are too awful to even think about! Of even more importance...without Hank there would have been no Round Robin! Guy. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 22:57:49 +0000 From: Richard Havers Subject: Re: McCartney Steve Harvey wrote: > Would love to hear him play some slapbass on Bill Black's > old upright (which Linda bought him for a birthday present). I did once.....he caressed it, revered it....and made it hum! Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 18:07:53 EST From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: What Is Rock & Roll? Alan Gordon wrote: > There is a book that came out in '92 called "What Was > The First Rock 'N' Roll Record?" that is pretty darn > interesting as an historical treatise. It doesn't really > name a specific song, more it offers 50 choices and > many whys and wherefores for each. I will try to find that book--and thanks for the compliment. Rashkowsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 23:57:38 -0000 From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: What Is Rock & Roll? Alan Gordon wrote: > There is a book that came out in '92 called "What Was > The First Rock 'N' Roll Record?" that is pretty darn > interesting as an historical treatise. It doesn't really > name a specific song, more it offers 50 choices and > many whys and wherefores for each. I will try to find that book--and thanks for the compliment. Rashkosvky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 23:12:27 +0000 From: Stuffed Animal Subject: Jeff Barry/The Spartans Guy Lawrence: > What's the sum total of the group's knowledge about Jeff > Barry's time with the Spartans? All I know is that their > "Can You Waddle?" is one of the greatest dance craze > records ever made. In the grand tradition of The Raindrops, The Archies and Milli Vanilli, The Spartans (at least the group that recorded "Can You Waddle?") were merely a studio group. What you hear on that record is the overdubbed voices of Jeff Barry. Logically, he also arranged and produced the song (actually, I like the instrumental flipside better than the topside). If "Can You Waddle?" had sprung for a hit, a touring group might've been recruited after the fact, but whether or not Jeff himself would've gone on tour is open to speculation. Stuff -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 18:16:51 EST From: David Bell Subject: Re: Telephone songs Just thought of Little Miss Dynamite's "Ring A My Phone". Great early track from the diminutive songstress. David. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 18:09:26 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: More Superman-Related Requests Rex Strother wrote: > Spectropoppers, the list of Superman songs is going very good; > I appreciate all the help (some great obscure ones). It came > to me that I should possibly expand my request using keywords > like: "Metropolis", "Daily Planet", "Kryptonite", "Man of Steel", > "Fortress of Solitude" and "Lois Lane" ("Lex Luthor" anyone?) Stewart Copeland did an early turn under the name of Klark Kent, for one of his brother's labels. I think I may still have one or both of those records. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 18:11:36 EST From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Ronnie Dante (with Vance & Pockriss) Jeff Lemlich: > The flip is just as interesting. It would later be recorded > for the Epic label by Michael "my name is Michael, I've got > a nickel" Vance. Vance's record was retitled "Michael's Love > Song", with some lyric changes (including a biting dog that > didn't score many points in the playground in Michael's mind). Paul Vance ripped that song from a old PD children's gospel thing --I think it is titled " Jesus The Light Of The World". Melody is note-for-note. Rashkosvky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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