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Spectropop - Digest Number 806



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______________        S  P  E  C  T  R  O  P  O  P        ______________
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                        Jamie LePage (1953-2002)
                  http://www.spectropop.com/Jamie.htm
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Who were Good and Plenty?
           From: Emily 
      2. Re: Telephone Songs / Ronnie Dante
           From: David Coyle 
      3. Re: Telephone Songs
           From: David Coyle 
      4. Re: What Is Rock & Roll?
           From: TD 
      5. Re: Top Of The Pops clips
           From: David Coyle 
      6. Re: Early Rock & Roll
           From: Steve Harvey 
      7. Re: New At Spectropop
           From: David A. Young 
      8. Re: Telephone songs
           From: Andres Jurak 
      9. Re: Telephone Songs
           From: Artie Wayne 
     10. Re: Normie Rowe, original versions & Artie Wayne!
           From: Artie Wayne 
     11. Good & Plenty?
           From: Country Paul 
     12. Re: "We Can't Go On This Way"
           From: Artie Wayne 
     13. Re: Telephone songs
           From: Richard Williams 
     14. Re: Detergents /  Ronnie Dante
           From: Kitty Hinkle 
     15. Re: Page Sessions
           From: Marc Miller 
     16. Who needs a telephone?
           From: Stuart Miller 
     17. Re: Mark Wirtz / Telephone songs
           From: Patrick Rands 
     18. Re: Early Rock & Roll
           From: Dan Hughes 
     19. Question for Artie Wayne
           From: Mikey 
     20. Re: Telephone Songs
           From: Phil Milstein 
     21. Hit Me With Your Croquet Stick!
           From: Steve Harvey 
     22. Marsh/McCartney/Reviewers
           From: Alan Gordon 
     23. I stand corrected, good sir!
           From: Steve Harvey 
     24. Jeff Barry
           From: Guy Lawrence 
     25. www.bbc.co.uk
           From: Phil Chapman 


-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 1 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 15:43:37 -0000 From: Emily Subject: Who were Good and Plenty? Who were the duo Douglas Good and Ginny Plenty? I'm doing research for my Web site, http://www.tonyromeo.net I know that Tony Romeo wrote for them and Wes Farrell recorded them, right? I read that Douglas Good was Tony Romeo, but now I think that may be wrong information. Thanks. Emily -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 12:51:18 -0800 (PST) From: David Coyle Subject: Re: Telephone Songs / Ronnie Dante Of course, Ike and Tina's "Tell Her I'm Not Home" is a transgenderfied version of "Tell Him I'm Not Home" by the great Chuck Jackson, which I used for my answering machine message a while back. I let the first two lines play, then let the rest continue as a bed for the rest of the message. It was cute while it lasted. I thought that Yoplait commercial used the original hit version of "Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow Polka Dot Bikini"?? If so, the original was by Brian Hyland. Is Ron Dante doing commercial jingles now, like Joey Levine has been? BTW, Ron Dante's video for "Sugar Sugar" by the Archies is still playing regularly on VH-1 Classic. It has Dante miming to the vocals and a chorus of Ron Dantes pretending to play the various instruments. Oddly enough, it kind of resembles David Cassidy's clip for "I Think I Love You." David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 13:21:17 -0800 (PST) From: David Coyle Subject: Re: Telephone Songs There was a compilation released a couple years ago of unreleased tunes by garage/psych legends the Music Machine called "Ignition." The last track on the CD is called "902," and it's probably the most lighthearted song the Music Machine, who specialized in tuned-down alienation type songs, ever recorded. In the song, the singer is trying to reach some girl at that extension, only to get her father on the line. The song pretty much crescendos in a case of mixed identities, and the verse goes: "I don't understand, your Linda Lou is only ten? This has got to be a bummer, I think I got the wrong number..." The studio laughter at the end of this verse is very uncharacteristic of a Music Machine recording, and thus makes it the arguable highlight of the set. The whole CD is definitely worth checking out. David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 16:43:07 -0500 From: TD Subject: Re: What Is Rock & Roll? Shawn: > Big Momma Thornton should be the the #1 influence in Rock and Roll > her song is first Rock and Roll song. Little Richard should be #2 > and the King of Rock and Roll. Interesting choice! Thorton's "Hound Dog" is great. Little Richard lays claim to the title "Father of Rock and Roll". Richard prefaced his claim by declaring that Elvis Presley is the King of Rock and Roll --"there's no disputing that"--but, said Richard, as he was seated at the piano, "I am The Father of Rock and Roll!", and he launched into "Tutti Frutti"! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 14:01:40 -0800 (PST) From: David Coyle Subject: Re: Top Of The Pops clips These video clips and the archives of Brian Matthew's "Sounds Of The Sixties" radio show are two great reasons to check out the BBC website. Thanks to whoever provided the link. Thirty seconds of "Legend Of Xanadu" was more than adequate for hearing the lyrics to the spoken passage Dave Dee throws in the middle. It's kinda buried in the mix on the DDDBMT comp I have. Dave Cee -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 16:17:19 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Early Rock & Roll Tom Taber: > I found in a local newspaper info on a Minstrel show that was to > appear here (Albion, NY) in the early 1880s... Wasn't that about the time of the Rolling Stones first American tour? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 08:14:26 -0000 From: David A. Young Subject: Re: New At Spectropop Hi, gang, I've gotten so behind in my reading that tonight I just decided to ignore everything else on my plate and make a dent in the backlog. I still have three issues of Goldmine and one of Discoveries, among other things, to go, but at least I got started. I finally read the interviews with Phil Spector that appeared in the London magazines G:2 and Telegraph recently, but the best reading of the night was right here on Planet Spectropop. Don't know how I ever made it this long without devouring the pieces on The Lovelites and Charlotte O'Hara! If you've been denying yourself too, for whatever reasons, trust me; you want to drop anything else you have going on and treat yourself to these in-depth, insightful, and sensitive offerings, written with heart and presented with style. Amazing. Sorry to be so far behind the curve in adding my praise, but these essays are too extraordinary to not comment upon. I also checked out Phil Milstein's recent review of the new Shirley Ellis CD. Phil's posts have always struck me as well-written and thoughtful, but this piece is absolute poetry. Add my name to the list of those convinced by his words to purchase the disc. I enjoyed the review, along with Phil's linked contribution to the Charlotte O'Hara article, so much that I spent a great deal of time checking out the rest of his fantastic song-poem site at http://www.aspma.com where the link appears. I don't know how I've missed this gem before, but I'm sure glad I've found (and bookmarked) it now. If you haven't yet, check it out. A big thanks to all 863 (and growing) of you that keep this list so vitally informative, friendly, and fun. An especially big thanks to those who keep it, and the companion Web site, going behind the scenes. I can't even imagine how much work that is. After this evening's experience, I have a fresh resolve to continue to explore the archived features and digests (and Stuffed Animal's newish Tico/George Goldner story; I'm afraid that once I got lost in Phil M's site, I couldn't stay awake long enough to come back to S'pop and give it the attentive read it obviously deserves). If it's been a while, I urge you to rediscover for yourself the bounty that is the Spectropop site. I feel very lucky indeed to be part of it. David A. Young -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 10:39:21 -0000 From: Andres Jurak Subject: Re: Telephone songs Not an oldie but touchy... Can't Think Straight - Gilbert O'Sullivan with Peggy Lee -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 04:55:19 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Telephone Songs One of my favorite telephone songs is "starting all over again" by Mel and Tim [on one of the Stax labels] a recitation over the intro sets up the story.....there's dialing...and conversation ......but by the time the record became a hit .......it had been remastered and the recitation had been deleted. regards, Artie Wayne -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 05:19:11 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Normie Rowe, original versions & Artie Wayne! Lindsay.........You oughta' be my publicist!!!! Thanks for saying so many nice things. Growing up in the 50s' and 60s' yop 40 radio consisted of the top of all generes playing side by side so I wrote Pop, R+ B , Rock and country for World artists at the same time. You're freaking me out, I never knew about any cover records on "Go to him" which I wrote with Bess Coleman, who was one of the Beatles' press officers. I cut it with her brother as the London Knights for Laurie records.......That was the last I heard of it. I'd love to hear the original or a cover - could you please contact me off list. Thanks and regards, Artie Wayne -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 08:39:19 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Good & Plenty? Just conjecture - could "Plenty" have been Cassandra Morgan, who was a member of Romeo's group Trout on MGM? Anyone with any ideas on that? Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 05:57:44 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: "We Can't Go On This Way" Bob.......Thanks for posting " We can't go on this way" ..... It's as good as I remembered!!! regards, Artie -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 15:38:37 +0000 From: Richard Williams Subject: Re: Telephone songs George Leonard wrote: > He'll Have To Go and This is Dedicated to the One I Love are two songs > that repay any logical positivist's close reading. Jim Reeves' version > is better than Solomon Burke's because the diction is country white, > not black. As far as I'm concerned, Mr Leonard, the diction on Atlantic 2218 is Solomon Burke's. But you're very welcome to prefer Jim Reeves' version, if that's your taste. Richard Williams -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 16:20:16 -0000 From: Kitty Hinkle Subject: Re: Detergents / Ronnie Dante Laura Pinto: > Speaking of the Detergents and the Shangri-Las, I came across a rather > obscure single via eBay about a year ago by the former entitled "I Can > Never Eat Home Anymore." Haven't managed to hear "I can never eat at home anymore" but, rest assured, I'll be on the lookout. As for Ron Dante commercials, he's also heard on McD's old "you deserve a break today" as well as some for Coke, American Airlines and Budweiser. Never let it be said he's not diverse! Kitty -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 12:17:15 -0500 From: Marc Miller Subject: Re: Page Sessions Phil M: > I have become very hungry for a compilation of Jimmy Page's session > work. I know one or two have trickled out over the years, but those > have unfortunately passed me by. Can anyone tip me to the top-level > details of any such comps? Eagerly awaiting a hearty dose of that > pipin' hot guitar Amazingly, there's a comp coming out in April on Fuel2000 (distr. by Universal, but then so is everything...). Besides the Yardbirds it's got Les Fleur De Lys, The Authentics, The Talismen, The Masterminds and a few others. Comprehensive? Not even close. A good start? Well, something is better than nothing. Marc -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 17:23:41 -0000 From: Stuart Miller Subject: Who needs a telephone? George L Call that being let down by your woman George? Give me a break. This happened to me. Except it wasn't just my woman that done me wrong, oh no. When your best friend tells you that he saw your girl out with somebody new, well, you'd believe that it's true, your best friend would never be lying to you now would he? Heck, how was I to know he loved her too? I was betrayed. Now in situations like this, and it does happen George, most people would have the decency to just suppress it, so as to not cause pain to anyone else. But he was always around and just to impress her he would put me down. But old good natured me, I laughed off the things that he said about me, oh indeed I did. And you may well ask, because I did afterwards, how much of a fool can one guy be? "Buddies to the end", he always said we'd be buddies to the end. But what kind of friend is he, taking my girl, when he knew that she meant the world to me? Yep, I was betrayed. For as long as I live, I'll never forget her enough to forgive. Why do this to me? Too late I see, I was betrayed. When I look back at the whole thing afterwards, I don't understand why my "pal" drew attention to the situation in the first place. And I notice I fall into the usual trap in these situations of blaming one or other of the two parties, but in truth they were both to blame. I wish I could tell you it all ended happily and that I won her back but alas........... They're still together, probably glued to each other by some sticky substance called guilt. He became an accountant, she became a dog trainer, and they had the usual 2.3 children and live happily in Iowa. They send me a Christmas card every year. I on the other hand fell into a life of despondency and depression as a result of the whole affair. Down on my luck, constantly short of cash, and following a path of utter aimlessness through life, I eventually had no alternative but to resort to the profession of the despised and desperate - I became a singer. Mine is the story of the rags to star. The world at my feet, huh, but I've come too far, and, I think I'd better stop now, I'm getting very confused. with apologies to Sandy and Denny Stuart -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 17:30:09 -0000 From: Patrick Rands Subject: Re: Mark Wirtz / Telephone songs Looky Looky - there is a review of Pop Works II here too (way down the page): http://www.shindig-magazine.com/reviews-feb2003-1.html Also Mark Eric, Voices Of The Millennium, and the Forum on Rev-ola get reviews too. What a great site. I went through a Thomas Fritsch phase many years ago when I got my hands on two of his albums. Anyone know anything about this guy? I once had a party in which me and my guests played night croquet with the Thomas Fritsch lps playing on the outdoor speakers. Very strange night! I thought of another Telephone song - The Pengion Cafe Orchestra have a fun song in which they use a dial tone in the rhythm as a melody. It was featured in the Oliver Stone / Eric Bogosian movie Talk Radio. I think it was called Telephone and Rubber Band. I wonder if the "new" Joel Schumacher movie Phone Booth will have any phone songs. :Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 13:22:04 -0600 From: Dan Hughes Subject: Re: Early Rock & Roll Tom Taber: > I found in a local newspaper info on a Minstrel show that > was to appear here (Albion, NY) in the early 1880s... Steve Harvey: > Wasn't that about the time of the Rolling Stones first > American tour? No, Steve, that was their famous Second Comeback Tour.... ---Dan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 15:33:07 -0800 From: Mikey Subject: Question for Artie Wayne For Artie Wayne: Do you recall who the drummer was on Brian Hyland's "The Joker Went Wild"? It sounds a bit like Hal Blaine, but not overly so. Was it recorded in LA? Western? Thanks so much! Mikey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 14:53:09 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Telephone Songs David Coyle wrote: > "I don't understand, your Linda Lou is only ten? > This has got to be a bummer, I think I got the wrong > number..." Sounds from the description like a play on another 'phone song I don't recall having seen mentioned here yet, Chuck Berry's "Memphis TN." --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 12:57:55 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Hit Me With Your Croquet Stick! Patrick Rands wrote: > I once had a party in which me and my guests played > night croquet with the Thomas Fritsch LPs playing on > the outdoor speakers. Very strange night! Wasn't Thomas Fritsch the composer who only used a croquet mallet and a large supply of mice in his recordings? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 13:01:09 -0800 From: Alan Gordon Subject: Marsh/McCartney/Reviewers Dan Hughes wrote re. Dave Marsh's book > Marsh's book of the best 1001 singles of all time really > dissed Tina Turner's "River Deep - Mountain High" > - ruined the whole book for me. Hi Dan: Sorry, I'm VERY behind in my reading, but I thought I should comment on this. (How completely un-Zen of me). This situation always leaves me sorta flat. "Bad" reviewers seem to think that someone of lofty import had died and left them the single arbiter of taste, style, talent, etc. It shouldn't, but it annoys the heck outta me. From my experience, I've noticed that most reviewers are frustrated or lazy at whatever craft they review. I think Tom Wolfe said that (and I seriously paraphrase): Reviewers are mad because you didn't write their novel, or paint their picture, or play their song (etc.)... meanwhile... they're not. And then of course there's the age-old wisdom: Those that can, do. Those that can't, teach. And those that can't teach, teach gym. I just finished a great older book, that besides a few comments, was a fountain of information about The Byrds. And I thought I was pretty knowledgeable about these guys. The writer, early on, talks about how Chris Hillman, at this particular point, had far-surpassed Paul McCartney in his ability to play bass. I know most of us think that what we "know," is what is true. But as great a bass player as Chris is, well, in my humble estimation, he's no McCartney. Paul had a far-reaching understanding of arrangement and production that did so much for his bass playing. He knew where a note fitted or was "needed" and where it wasn't. He didn't have to play a lot of notes to impress anyone. Everything he did "served" the song. And in saying all of this, I have to state that Chris was a serious mother-%$#@&* on his 4 stringed instrument. But that's just my opinion. I'll go to my room now. peace, albabe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 13:30:14 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: I stand corrected, good sir! Tom Taber: > I found in a local newspaper info on a Minstrel > show that was to appear here (Albion, NY) in the early > 1880s... Steve Harvey: > Wasn't that about the time of the Rolling Stones > first American tour? > No, Steve, that was their famous Second Comeback > Tour.... Before Brian Jones joined them? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 22:00:08 -0000 From: Guy Lawrence Subject: Jeff Barry What's the sum total of the group's knowledge about Jeff Barry's time with the Spartans? All I know is that their "Can You Waddle?" is one of the greatest dance craze records ever made. Regards, Guy. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 22:02:35 -0000 From: Phil Chapman Subject: www.bbc.co.uk Keith Beach: > I'd like to report...the excellent TV documentary series, > Lost Highway: The Story Of Country Music, playing on BBC2 > http://www.bbc.co.uk/music/folkcountry/losthighway/ > reached the late 50s on Saturday. David Coyle: > These video clips and the archives of Brian Matthew's > "Sounds Of The Sixties" radio show are two great reasons > to check out the BBC website. Thanks all, found a neat audio clip of La La Brooks talking about "the mad recording technique of record producer Phil Spector." http://www.bbc.co.uk/aboutmusic/rockandpop/1963.shtml It's a great pity they disposed of so much video footage from the period. Phil -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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