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Spectropop - Digest Number 780



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______________        S  P  E  C  T  R  O  P  O  P        ______________
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                        Jamie LePage (1953-2002)
                  http://www.spectropop.com/Jamie.htm
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There are 16 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. George Goldner and Tico Records
           From: Team Spectropop 
      2. Re: Kingsmen / Little Latin Lupe Lu
           From: Richard Havers 
      3. Re: Kingsmen / Little Latin Lupe Lu
           From: James Botticelli 
      4. Re: new Motown  book
           From: Stephanie Campbell 
      5. Re: Boston stuff and more
           From: Clark 
      6. Motor City?
           From: Lindsay Martin 
      7. Re: Maurice Gibb
           From: Eddy 
      8. I don't know i you like parodies of 60's songs, but if you do.....
           From: Douglas Tor Hershman 
      9. Re: The Forum
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
     10. Re: George Goldner and Tico Records
           From: Mike Edwards 
     11. Re: Mark Eric
           From: Brian Chidester 
     12. Re: Who'da thought it? - Joanie Sommers
           From: Frank 
     13. Re: George Goldner and Tico Records
           From: Phil Milstein 
     14. Re: Maurice Gibb
           From: Phil Milstein 
     15. Josephine Sunday versus Robin Ward
           From: Amber 
     16. Jack Nitzsche at Spectropop update
           From: Martin Roberts 


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Message: 1
   Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 13:40:16 -0000
   From: Team Spectropop 
Subject: George Goldner and Tico Records

There's probably no form of popular music more under-appreciated
in the United States than Latin music. Yet, it's hard to imagine
a time when it wasn't heard there. Given that large sections of
the country were once Mexican territory, Latin songs and dances
have been a part of the cultural tapestry of America for a very
long time! Over the last 75 years, their influence on country,
jazz, rock, reggae, rhythm and blues, disco and even Broadway show
tunes has been profound; you can hear it in songs as diverse as
"San Antonio Rose", "St. Louis Blues", "Spanish Harlem", "Doo Wah
Diddy Diddy", "Turn The Beat Around" and Irving Berlin's "Heat
Wave".

In the '40s, the first nationally-distributed independent labels
devoted to Latin music came into being - Mardi Gras, Verne, Coda,
Seeco and others. George Goldner's Tico Records was arguably
foremost among these companies...

After many months of preparation, Spectropop are pleased to
announce the launch of Mambo Gee Gee: The Story Of George Goldner
And Tico Records by Stuffed Animal.

Written in the inimitable style we have come to expect from Senor
Animal, Mambo Gee Gee is a work of major research worthy of Vanity
Fair. So kick off your shoes and get comfy, you're in for a long
and very entertaining read...

Start here:
http://www.spectropop.com/tico/index.htm

Enjoy!

The Spectropop Team



-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Fri, 07 Feb 2003 23:34:34 +0000 From: Richard Havers Subject: Re: Kingsmen / Little Latin Lupe Lu Ron wrote: > I was always kinda partial to the Kingsmen's garage version of > "Little Latin Lupe Lu". Phil Milstein: > Anyone know if their version was ever released on a single, and > if so whether it too may have charted? It came out in 1964 on Wand (157). Got to No.46 and spent 9 weeks on the chart. Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Fri, 07 Feb 2003 18:53:22 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Kingsmen / Little Latin Lupe Lu Phil Milstein wrote: > Anyone know if (the Kingsmen's) version (of Little Latin Lupe Lu) was > ever released on a single, and if so whether it too may have charted? 7.11.64 #46 peak. On chart 9 weeks, Wand #157...Did I beat Mick? BTW, I think their version of "Money" surpasses both Barrett Strong and the Beatles. -- James Botticelli Member: The EZ Revolution -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 02:31:30 -0000 From: Stephanie Campbell Subject: Re: new Motown book Phil Milstein: > Also, a new Motown book is out, entitled Motown: Music, Money, Sex, > And Power. Judging from the title, it focuses primarily on business > aspects. The author is Gerald Posner, a brilliant journalist best > known for his Case Closed: Lee Harvey Oswald And The Assassination > Of JFK. Phil, This book is a waste of time if you have read all of the other Motown books and there are TONS of innacuracies in this book. If someone doesn't know that much about Motown or has not read Otis Williams of the Temps bio, or Mary Wilson's Dreamgirl: My Life As A Supreme, or Nelson George's Where Did Our Love Go, they don't need this book.... He got all of his information from other books and the library, he hardly interviewed anyone. It's clearly the business side of Motown and it's interesting reading but some of the things he says are better said in other books. Stephanie -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 05:58:12 -0000 From: Clark Subject: Re: Boston stuff and more Just a note on all of this week's postings that were of interest to me. I'm wondering how long Dick Summer was on WBZ. Someone said early 68 was last? I know this is a mistake to mention, but somewhere in my archives, I have a 15 minute aircheck I or my brother taped at 2 am off Dick's subway show while living in Dodge City, Kansas that is classic memories, like what I spoke of recent emails, i.e. sponsors, his son in the studio, 45 edits, Fugs in concert etc. Anyway, I remember he gave the date as January 68, so may have been near the end, but he was fun. He raves about a "New great group" called "the Spirit". I can only assume he was speaking of Spirit od Ode records. That would certainly explain the raves! I'm pretty sure I have WBZ (Dick? or WKYC playing the Fugs' "Garden is Open" on tape, so the Reprise stuff did get airplay there too. Personally, I used to play "Kill for Peace" on my old 60's show in the 80's. It seems very poignant today. As for KOMA AM, yes, they're news now. Too bad! Will be great if WSAI goes on-line! Take care, Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 17:54:14 +1000 From: Lindsay Martin Subject: Motor City? Could some wise person here please clarify the meaning of "Motor City" for me? I can't quite get a handle on what it is. It seems to be some kind of post-60s neo-Motown sub-genre of Northern Soul... or is it? Thanks, Lindsay -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 09:15:59 +0100 From: Eddy Subject: Re: Maurice Gibb Phil Milstein: > An interesting commentary in the online magazine Reason about the > passing of Maurice Gibb, in particular about why it's been so overlooked > in the press. See http://www.reason.com/hod/bd020603.shtml I got a "not found" message for this link, Phil. Maybe a few lines on the essentials instead? Thanks, Eddy (Admin Note: The URL was printed incorrectly in the first instance. The one quoted above is correct.) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 08:44:19 -0000 From: Douglas Tor Hershman Subject: I don't know i you like parodies of 60's songs, but if you do..... My lill' song has been in the Top 10, on Mp3.com's parody chart, for a while, it is funny! http://artists.mp3s.com/artist_song/3025/3025703.html )))(((((( ()...() ....U.... ..[___].. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 09:09:59 -0000 From: Billy G. Spradlin Subject: Re: The Forum As much I liked the Grassroots' cover - it's the one I heard first, but I take the Forum's original. The Grassroots' version is a bit too "laid back" and makes me wonder if it was an LP track that got pulled as a 45. The Forum's production is more dynamic, and I love the "Cantcha feel it Baby" part and that nasally counterpoint voice (which reminds me of Joey Levine) jumps in with the chorus ("The River get WIDE!!!"). Were they a studio creation or a real band? After listening to it again this song would have been perfect for the Righteous Brothers to record - they were starting to hurt for hits by that time. Billy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 11:53:07 -0500 From: Mike Edwards Subject: Re: George Goldner and Tico Records Stuffed Animal: > There's probably no form of popular music more under-appreciated in > the United States than Latin music. I would have to disagree with this. Billboard publishes two Latin charts and many artists pay at least lip service to Latin culture when making recordings. Take Geri Halliwell: "Mi Chico Latino" wasn't put out to introduce us to a new genre, it was an attempt to get with a mainstream sound. Likewise, Boyzone with "Experiencia Religiosa" (Mystical Experience) and "Palabras" (Words); both were attempts to aim at a very big market. > Yet, it's hard to imagine a time when it wasn't heard here. Given that > large sections of the country were once Mexican territory, Latin songs > and dances have been a part of our cultural tapestry for a very long time. I would suggest that most Latin music has its basis in Puerto Rican and Cuban culture. Although both countries are Spanish speaking, any ties they have to Mexico seem to end there. Mike Edwards -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 16:14:49 EST From: Brian Chidester Subject: Re: Mark Eric I have an interview with Mark Eric from two years ago, where he discusses being influenced by the Beach Boys' "Friends" record, as well as Walter Wanderly. He also had a song recorded by the Four Freshmen in '67, which Brian Wilson cannot even lay claim to. I find his 1969 album to be so fun, a little absurd vocally... the warble of a Sun truly setting on the California Sound. Mark did a show in L.A. at the Highland Grounds last April, which was really cool, as he played probably half the songs from MIDSUMMER'S solo on piano. Unfortunately, for a lot of us here in L.A., he hasn't been so easy to work with once he found that we had interest in his music. I was sorry to tell him that I didn't know anyone who could make him a superstar this late in the game. I do hope he's doing well. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 00:41:33 -0000 From: Frank Subject: Re: Who'da thought it? - Joanie Sommers Mike Edwards wrote: > One 45 I don't think I saw listed was "Don't Pity Me" by Joanie > Sommers of "Johnny Get Angry" fame. Kev Roberts talks about the > Northern Soul Paradox in his book "The Northern Soul Top 500": "Many > Northern hits performed by pop artists like Holly St James, Joanie > Sommers, Timi Yuro and Lynne Randell". Kev goes so far as to > list "Don't Pity Me" as # 18 in the bubbling under section of his > survey, right there above Benny Spellman's "Fortune Teller"! --- Thanks, Mike for helping me better understand the definition of Northern Soul. Correct me if I'm wrong, but as I understand it, most of the Norther Soul songs were not necessarily hits in the U.S. or the U.K. at the time of their release. Joanie Sommers did perform "Don't Pity Me" on the NBC Hullabaloo program on 11 May 1965, but the record did not chart in the U.S. Her video is on Vol.9 of the Hullabaloo series. I believe it was lip-synched instead of sung live. Does anyone know her single was released in the U.K., either in 1965 or since then? Joanie recorded several other songs with a similar sound in the mid 1960s. Some of them remain unreleased. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 22:52:21 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: George Goldner and Tico Records Stuffed Animal: > There's probably no form of popular music more under-appreciated in > the United States than Latin music. That may be true within the gringo audience, but Latin music (of various stripes) receives very wide favor among the Latin audience in the U.S., which, of course, is huge. Mike Edwards: > I would suggest that most Latin music has its basis in Puerto Rican and > Cuban culture. Although both countries are Spanish speaking, any ties > they have to Mexico seem to end there. While that may be true for the northeast, I don't think it holds for the southwest, where Mexican-derived sounds reign supreme among the Latin audience. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 23:04:09 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Maurice Gibb Eddy wrote: > I got a "not found" message for this link, Phil. Maybe a few lines on > the essentials instead? Admin wrote: > (Admin Note: The URL was printed incorrectly in the first instance. The > one quoted above is correct.) I hope that took care of the problem. It was more of a think-piece (or perhaps even a rant) than any sort of factual article, so to summarize the writer's themes could hardly do justice to its essence. However, if the link still isn't working right (I have no Web access at the mo'), basically he was PO'd that Maurice's death received so little play in the press, and tried to explain the reasons why it wasn't more adequately covered. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sun, 09 Feb 2003 10:10:31 -0000 From: Amber Subject: Josephine Sunday versus Robin Ward Mick Patrick said: > And talking of session-singers, thanks so much to Charles G. > Hill for the heads up regarding the ROBIN/Jackie WARD > interview featured on the Partridge Family website C'mon Get > Happy. Thanks to that interview I now know more about the > "In His Car" girl than I ever thought possible. I'd urge > everyone to click here and read it all for themselves > http://www.cmongethappy.com/interviews/jw/index.html > One subject the interview does not cover was whether or not > Robin/Jackie recorded using the name Josephine Sunday ... > must try and contact the lady herself. Duh! No, silly boy, Josephine Sunday and Robin/Jackie Ward were two different people, sure enough. In fact I have Josephine's autograph somewhere among my souvenirs, along with a rather fetching polka dot bellbottom pant suit I stole from her dressing room. Josephine made that outfit herself. Oops, ever so slightly too much information... Aaah, I remember it well. It was the week before Christmas 1965 and "Turn! Turn! Turn!" by the Byrds was at number one. I was on the comeback trail in Philadelphia. I'd been banned from the Corny Collins Show and was beginning to miss the limelight. But Daddy called in a few favors and secured me an invitation from Dick Clark to demonstrate some new dances on Bandstand. Honey, I was on that Greyhound bus before you could say Philly Barracuda! I'm here to tell you that Josephine Sunday was one of the best Ronnie Ronette lookalikes you ever clapped eyes on. She had flown in from Los Angeles to do Bandstand but her father was born in the Philippines, you see. She told me to call her Sunday because that was her real middle name. I've forgotten her surname but it was something Hispanic. My new pal Sunday gave a very energetic lip-sync performance of "You Won't Even Know Her Name" that day. There are three Josephine Sunday records in my collection; "You Won't Even Know Her Name" on Tower, "He's Not Mine Anymore" on Pinnacle and another one on the Hemlock label. At least one of these was in the style of Rosie & the Originals, I recall. I'll tell you more when and if they ever let me out of this darn place. How I wish it was 1965 again (sigh). A.v.T. xxx -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sat, 08 Feb 2003 19:27:34 -0000 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Jack Nitzsche at Spectropop update Phil Crosby's "Where The Blue Of The Night" (Reprise 220 '63) is the current Record of the Week now playing on the homepage, http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/index.htm Next week's choice is either Timi Yuro with "Could This Be Magic" or Judy Henske's "Dolphins In The Sea". Both are real corkers. Nitzsche Radio has a new sound file playing at http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/jacknitzscheradio.htm The jingles have all been played previously but, as an experiment, this week's track is the first 'drum session'. There are a few of these, most are with spoken intro by Jack Nitzsche. I would like to know if there is an interest in hearing all of them or whether the site should instead rotate the 'proper' jingles. Al Hazan has again been taking a trip down memory lane. His recollections of working with Dora Hall and Jack have now been added to the Early Days page at http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/AlHazan.htm It makes for great reading. Martin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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