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Spectropop - Digest Number 773



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                        Jamie LePage (1953-2002)
                  http://www.spectropop.com/Jamie.htm
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There are 20 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Jeff Foskett / Billy Hinsche
           From: Kingsley Abbott 
      2. Re: Donna Lynn (another GREAT single)
           From: Ronnie Allen 
      3. Re: Franl Ifield
           From: Steve Harvey 
      4. "To Sandy With Love"  by  Kenny Karen
           From: Bill Kearns 
      5. Re: Hardy Boys / Definitive Rock Chorale
           From: Jeffrey Glenn 
      6. Re: Gentle Soul; Boston & Providence; Howard Tate; more
           From: Country Paul 
      7. Re: Del Shannon and Frank Ifield
           From: Michael Edwards 
      8. Re: Howard Tate
           From: Phil Milstein 
      9. Re: Phil Spector Daily Telegraph Interview UK
           From: Richard Hattersley 
     10. Re: Howard Tate on CD
           From: Mick Patrick 
     11. Re: Del Shannon
           From: Dan Hughes 
     12. Spector in the Telegraph
           From: John Lester 
     13. Re: Franl Ifield / Del Shannon
           From: Phil Milstein 
     14. Re: Phil Spector in the Telegraph
           From: Stuart Miller 
     15. Re: "Lovesick Blues"
           From: Richard Havers 
     16. Re: Dick Summer / Howard Tate etc
           From: Chris Stovall Brown 
     17. Jack Nitzsche at Spectropop update
           From: Martin Roberts 
     18. Re: "Lovesick Blues"
           From: Steve Harvey 
     19. Re: "Lovesick Blues"
           From: Phil Milstein 
     20. Re: Fumbled projects
           From: Jeff Lemlich 


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Message: 1
   Date: Sat, 01 Feb 2003 10:12:09 -0000
   From: Kingsley Abbott 
Subject: Jeff Foskett / Billy Hinsche

UK based members may be interested in this: Saturday 15th March - 1pm 
to 6pm - at The Wycliffe Rooms, George Street, Lutterworth, Leics will 
see Jeff Foskett and Billy Hinsche doing a double header for pretty 
well the whole afternoon.  Music, Q&As maybe a harmony workshop and 
other things.  This is a follow up to a similar event in London last 
year, which was a fascinating and entertaining afternoon.  Both men 
have toured extensively as Beach Boys, and both have extensive pop 
histories and current projects  (Special for Richard H - they are also 
doing a smaller on in Leith on March 18th).  Tickets are 20, with 
some of the proceeds going to the Carl Wilson Foundation I believe.
Check out the Beach Boys Britain site for more details: 
http://www.angelfire.com/la/Beachboysbritain or for ticket reservations 
email funky.pretty@btopenworld.com Attn Val - say Kingsley sent you!

Note for travellers - the venue is close to the M1 and is easily 
accessible.

Kingsley Abbott

PS - Can't find my Earth Opera, so I think I'll dig out some
old Ink Spots for George W - perhaps 'I Don't Want To Set The
World On Fire'....



-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 11:02:26 EST From: Ronnie Allen Subject: Re: Donna Lynn (another GREAT single) Doc Rock wrote: > I'm a big fan of Donna Lynn... Andres: > Is it the same Donna Lynn who once made `My Boyfriend Got A Beatle > Haircut' in 1964? ...If it's she, what has happened to her after > that more or less successful single? Were there any more releases? > Any connections with Donna Lynn, who made a cover photo for the > album The Very Best of Ashford & Simpson (released May 2002)? > Donnna Lynn 45s: > My Boyfriend Got a Beatle Haircut (also released lp by same name)/That > Winter Weekend (1964) > Ronnie/That's Me, I'm the Brother (1963) > Java Jones/Things That I Feel (1964) > Silly Girl/There Goes The Boy I Love With Mary (1964) > I'd Much Rather Be With the Girls/I'm Sorry More Than You Know (1965) > True Blue/When Your Heart Rings, Answer (1965) > Don't You Dare/I was Raining (1967) She also had the following single on Epic: Donna Loves Jerry/I'm In Love With George Maharis I believe it came out it 1963. Maharis was a label-mate of hers at the time and charted with his version of "Teach Me Tonight" so it wasn't merely a coincidence that she did her "true confession" song! But it's the "Donna Loves Jerry" side that I think should have been a monster hit. In my opinion it was as catchy as as ANY "girl-artist" record of that era. I've heard that Donna eventually moved to Germany and raised a family. There is virtually no information about her on the web, including her real name (which may or may not have been "Donna Lynn"). If anyone here has more information about her I know I and Doc Rock and Andres and I assume many other here who fondly remember her would appreciate it! I do recall that back in the early 60s there were many ads for her in Variety Magazine that referred to her as "teenage and terrific Donna Lynn"! And she surely was both! This is definitely an artist who deserved to achieve more success than she did. Ronnie Allen -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 08:45:36 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Franl Ifield James Botticelli wrote: > (Frank Ifield) also recorded "Lovesick Blues" which was a Hank-type song. It was a Hank Williams tune, not just that type. Del Shannon's "Swiss Maid" was no.2 at the same time.... Great, great tune, that gets overlooked when Del's name is mentioned. I never heard it until the live lp came out in the 70s. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 16:47:44 -0000 From: Bill Kearns Subject: "To Sandy With Love" by Kenny Karen Re: "To Sandy with Love" by Kenny Karen (circa 1962) hello! believe it or not, i grew up during the sixties and never heard this song. does anyone have a copy i can buy? was it ever available on a 33-1/3? how about one of those "rock-n-roll" hits of the sixties tapes or cd's? can anyone help me on this? i would be glad to pay all the expenses. thanks in advance for your help. bill kearns -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 09:31:05 -0800 From: Jeffrey Glenn Subject: Re: Hardy Boys / Definitive Rock Chorale Rashkovsky: > Please world--judge me not by The Hardy Boys. If I knew how to play > things up to musica, I would play up a couple of the original demos we > did on their tunes for comparison; as well as The Definitive Rock > Chorale's version of "I Hear The Grass Singing", which was written for > The Hardy Boys and for which we used the demo track sweetened and pro- > voiced for a pretty good little record, if I do say so myself. If > anyone else has copy of that version and wishes to play it up, I'd be > delighted." Mike's wish is my command; the DRC's version of "I Hear The Grass Singing" is now playing at musica. Definitely one of my two favorite DRC tracks (the other being "Picture Postcard World" - the B-side of the second DRC 45 from 1968 "Variations On A Theme Called Hanky Panky" which is pretty cool itself!). I'm ripping three of the Hardy Boys demos that Mike talks about above, and I'll play them to musica if there's space later today. Two of these feature Ron Dante on lead vocal, the other is Mike himself. Jeff -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 12:54:12 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Re: Gentle Soul; Boston & Providence; Howard Tate; more Efram Turchick, re: Pam Polland's comments, thank you! I had been in correspondance with her a while back, but you got the conversation to where I'd hoped it would go. I agree with her - this, along with Andy Pratt's "Avenging Annie," is one of the top songs I know that should have been monster hits and weren't. Interesting - both fumbled projects were on Columbia - coincidence or conspiracy? :-) Seriously, this would make an interesting thread - name a favorite or two (and why, if you wish) that should have been a major hit and got somehow buried. My two biggest are above. Chris Stovall Brown: holy mackeral, man - where do I start?!? > Dick Summer's Subway-Sunday nites from 6-8pm. Does anyone else remember > this show/dates? I remember Dick's long-running overnight show as being extremely progressive, both in his own verbal content as well as the variety of music played. I vaguely remember the evening show, but for a ocuple of years a spirit of true programming adventurousness ran through all of WBZ; hearing major-level radio personalities, most of whom brought their brains as well as their patter to the air, playing better music than most, made WBZ the station of choice until they were eclipsed by "the new FM" - WBCN and WBRU as the two commercial-radio pioneers. I remember going up to the station in their first week of progressive programming (from 10pm to 5am, if I'm correct) and meeting Steve Kerwood, who is now I believe on NPR. I think Peter Wolf came on within a few weeks after the "format's" debut. > Country Paul, I recall seeing your group Benefit Street and may have > shared the stage with you guys at the Moses Brown Fieldhouse (if I recall > correctly??). Also I seem to recall you guys doing some Band covers back in > the day. Right on all counts, Chris - thank you! We loved The Band - I still do. Many tried to be them; none were. We were simply paying homage. What group were you with at the time? > Also speaking of Swallow (whom I ended up playing with some of the remains > of in the early 70's) they were managed by notorious Prov. promoter Skip > Chernov, who also owned a club on India Street called The Warehouse/The Jail > and many other things. I saw lots of the groups mentioned in the past couple > of days there on Sunday Afternoons. My recollection was that most of the > groups headed to the Boston Tea Party for weekend gigs would then come down > to Protown on Sundays and play for Skip at the Warehouse. I recall seeing at > least, Rhinoceros, Earth Opera, Illinois Speed Press (with Kal David), Cat > Mother and many more. Among many others, Benefit Street opened for Iggy & the Stooges there (before any of us knew anything about them). Iggy still owes me 10% of my hearing back! Skip Chernov offered to manage us, and promised us a record contract, but had no money. A local guy with ties to ABC Record Distributing had money and re-equipped us, but never got us recorded. Skip got frustrated trying to woo us and went after Swallow instead. Good luck, we said. Six months later, there's an LP on WB. Damn. > On February 22, I'll be backing up soul/blues legend Howard Tate with a 9 > piece band at Cambridge House of Blues. The band will include none other > than Al Kooper on B-3 and we'll be premiering some of the tunes off Howard's > soon to be released "comeback" lp (oops, cd!!) produced by Jerry Ragovoy. Geez - the original cast! Add Howard Tate's magfificent Verve LP to the shoulda-been-hits list above; considering the wealth of source material here ("Get It While You Can," "Look At Granny Run Run") made famous by others, this superb LP deserved to be more than a cult classic! I may be asking the obvious - may I assume you are Stovall Brown as in the Stovall Brown Blues Band? Want to share some history? Bob Rashkow mentions "the super Chameleon Church: Chevy Chase in his rocker days!" Another Rhode Island connection - Mr. Chase hails from Pawtucket! Check out the gorgeous "Camillia Is Changing," which was actually released as a 45. Richard Williams: > Earth Opera's The Great American Eagle Tragedy .... [I]f someone could get > a copy to George W Bush in the next few days, so much the better. Couldn't > be more relevant. Amen. I think we're going to see a lot of 60's spirit, if not the actual music, coming around again. Clark, JB and everyone contributing the New England memories: thank you. My heart beats faster with every one. Stefan, thanks for the note of caution. I placed an order for "my grail," the Esquires track, and will note here the level of success in ordering. Clark: > [Dusty Rhodes:] "WKBW (1520) in Buffalo has just gone back to its roots > with the "real oldies". Maybe we started something. Hope so.".... I wish > WSAI, WKBW all the best in their endeavors. One or two solid successes could perhaps help break the straitjacket of corporate programming now killing American radio. My hopes join yours. Guy Lawrence: > Ace's "Pet Projects" has shipped to record shops for sale on Monday 3rd. Mine arrived in New Jersey (USA) from CDNow yesterday (Feb. 1). As the liner notes point out, it is an album of failures, at least commercially. But there are some magnificent failures therein. It's also great to have my fave phantom instrumental, the Survivors' "After The Game." Add their "Pamela Jean" and Glen Campbell's "Guess I'm Dumb" to the shoulda-been-hits list, too. George Leonard: > [W]hen naive professors decide they're going to write things about rock > and roll my hair stands on end. Between the articles and the posts, there's a textbook of rock/pop history in Spectropop by first person participants or people close enough to be credible. (So who's going to compile it?) Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 17:53:02 -0000 From: Michael Edwards Subject: Re: Del Shannon and Frank Ifield Thinking back to 1962, one of the homework assignments I was set went like this: "Did Del Shannon's Swiss Maid teach Frank Ifield how to yodel? Discuss" From memory, my answer went: "No, that honor went to Roger Miller. Roger wrote Swiss Maid and it must have been given to Del when he went to Nashville to cut some sides in 1962. Roger Miller put the song out as a 45 himself in 1961: "Fair Swiss Maiden"/"Burma Shave" (RCA 7958). It was a nice version." Let's not forget though, that Frank Ifield's best song was "I Listen To My Heart", the self penned b-side of "I Remember You" Mike Edwards still looking for that Chase Webster 45, "Like I've Never Been Gone" on Dot from 1962. of course. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 13:37:09 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Howard Tate Country Paul wrote: > Geez - the original cast! Add Howard Tate's magfificent > Verve LP to the shoulda-been-hits list above; considering > the wealth of source material here ("Get It While You Can", > "Look At Granny Run Run") made famous by others, this > superb LP deserved to be more than a cult classic! Does anyone know if this album is available on CD in any way? I'd love to finally hear it, but don't want to spend $50 to get somebody's else beat-up LP. I hope to be there on the 22d. I caught Tate's show at the House of Booze last year, and it was magnificent. If he's aware of any changes in music since the mid-1960s, you sure couldn't have known it from the way he sounded that night. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 18:31:37 +0000 From: Richard Hattersley Subject: Re: Phil Spector Daily Telegraph Interview UK I'd also very much appreciate a scan of this piece in the Telegraph. I tried to get a copy from a garage on the way home from my gig last night but they had none left :-( thanks Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 20:42:21 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Howard Tate on CD Country Paul: > Add Howard Tate's magfificent Verve LP to the shoulda-been- > hits list above; considering the wealth of source material > here ("Get It While You Can", "Look At Granny Run Run") made . famous by others, this superb LP deserved to be more than a > cult classic! Phil Milstein: > Does anyone know if this album is available on CD in any > way? I'd love to finally hear it, but don't want to spend > $50 to get somebody's else beat-up LP. Oh yes sir, Tate's legendary Jerry Ragovoy-produced Verve LP of 1967 did indeed gain CD release. Mercury's "Get It While You Can" (Chronicles 314 526 868-2) 17-tracker contains the whole of that album, 02 tracks that were included on its 1969 reissue, 04 others that were released on 45s and one previously unissued cut. The sound is first rate and it comes with a nicely annotated 12 page booklet. The CD is a 1995 release but, although possibly deleted, should prove easier, and cheaper, to locate than an original copy of the album. To be honest, it's all a bit funky for me. I prefer Ragovoy's earlier work. Howard Tate: great singer, even better hairdo! MICK PATRICK -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 13:06:56 -0600 From: Dan Hughes Subject: Re: Del Shannon > Del Shannon's "Swiss Maid" was no.2 at the same time.... Where? It got no higher than #64 in the US.... ---Dan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 20:13:33 -0000 From: John Lester Subject: Spector in the Telegraph Did any one see the article about Phil Spector in the Saturday Telegraph? I only saw it when someone was reading it. I would like to read if it anyone can copy it for me!!! John Lester -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 15:45:03 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Franl Ifield / Del Shannon James Botticelli wrote: > (Frank Ifield) also recorded "Lovesick Blues" which was a Hank-type song. Steve Harvey wrote: > It was a Hank Williams tune, not just that type. Which Hank remade from Emmett Miller's 1928 version. Steve Harvey wrote: > Del Shannon's "Swiss Maid" was no.2 at the same time.... Great, great > tune, that gets overlooked when Del's name is mentioned. I never heard it > until the live lp came out in the 70s. Same here. That live album is one of the few records I realized I had made a mistake in getting rid of, and reacquired recently on CD. It's a stellar album. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 21:12:34 -0000 From: Stuart Miller Subject: Re: Phil Spector in the Telegraph I am happy to photocopy the Phil Spector interview from the telegraph for anyone who wants it. Contact me off list at Stuart.Miller4@btinternet.com and I will send you my address. I would appreciate an S.A.E. Stuart -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 21:17:46 +0000 From: Richard Havers Subject: Re: "Lovesick Blues" James Botticelli wrote: > (Frank Ifield) also recorded "Lovesick Blues" which was a Hank-type > song. Steve Harvey: > It was a Hank Williams tune, not just that type. Phil Milstein: > Which Hank remade from Emmett Miller's 1928 version. Hank Williams Jnr: "Without a doubt my father learned Lovesick Blues somehow from Emmett Miller. It was either by record or he heard him perform it in person at a minstrel show." Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 15:30:51 -0500 From: Chris Stovall Brown Subject: Re: Dick Summer / Howard Tate etc Hi all, Thanks to one list member I was actually able to contact and get a reply from Dick Summer. He told me that I was correct in my dating the show to 1966/67. I told him that I never seem to see The Subway show mentioned in a history of "progressive" radio on the East Coast and he replied "It would be nice to be "recognized", but it was so much fun that the "recognition" isn't very important." What a cool guy!!! I recall amidst heavy doses of Bosstown Sound stuff hearing Howling Wolf, John Coltrane and my first taste of both Jimi Hendrix (when Hey Joe was just out on a single!) and Cream (Spoonful-when the Fresh Cream lp was import only!). Speaking of Psych. Supmkt. I seem to recall shows by Mothers of Invention (where Zappa did Johnny Guitar Watson's Gangster of Love) and what I believe were the area's first Cream appearance! I seem to recall that Dick's radio show got pulled off the air and dissapointment reigned supreme on my mothers little transistor radio that I'd try and tune in late at night. Well it seemed like about 3 weeks later, in another latenight listening session, her tiny fm receiver pulled in Howling Wolf doing No Place To Go followed by Fleetwood Macs cover version. Damn, I had discovered the "American Revolution"-WBCN and Mississippi Harold Wilson (now owner of Mississippi's Restaurant on Mission Hill in Beantown) soon followed by Woofer Goofer aka Peter Wolf (just in from a gig) playing some blues but more soul type stuff. Well I wore the battery out on that sucker that night and quickly returned for what was really an amazing musical world. I had discovered WBCN only about 3 weeks after they had switched from an all classical format. For the next year or so my friends and I made plenty of pilgrimages up to Boston to the old Tea Party (53 Berkeley St. now a Christy's Mkt!) and saw Led Zep, Jethro Tull, Albert King, George Harmonica Smith, Big Mama Thornton etc. You get the picture! Around 1969, I recall WBRU trying to do a similar program switch that if memory serves me correctly was only for a couple of hours a day at first. I still preferred BCN and their more knowledgeable dj's. Regarding Country Paul's query about Stovall Brown Blues Band-this was and is still my band although I've spent time playing with a lot of people in the biz in addition to my own band-Fatman Wilson/Sliders, Luther Georgia Boy Shakey Snake Johnson, Bo Diddley, John Lee Hooker, James Cotton and I've done several gigs in the past few years with Howard Tate. Howard's story is ripe for a movie (and that may come to pass). He's been working the last year with Jerry Ragovoy on the "comeback" record and believe me it's great. No fake drums, horns etc just the real deal. What's more amazing is Howards voice is about 95% of what it was-He still hits those jawdropping falsettos with ease and his voice is just a little huskier (something I actually prefer). We are doing the tunes in the same key as the original records!! Well worth seeing when he's in your area. Regarding a cd reissue of the Verve stuff-one was put out in 1995-MERCURY (3145268682)-Get it While You Can. This is out of print and copies have gone on ebay as high as $145.00. I think Mercury is waiting for the new record to come out and then piggyback it for promotional purposes. Let me also throw out a line here to a well known Providence record collector/lurker (who knows who he is!!BA!) who could fill in a lot more on the Protown progressive radio sounds of people like Joe Thomas. Later, CSB -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sat, 01 Feb 2003 21:05:30 -0000 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Jack Nitzsche at Spectropop update Last week's contestants in the Battle of the Nitzsches generated a lot of interest. Garry Bonner is this week's winner. I do hope some of you have been looking forward to hearing it for the first time. I remember reading about it in BOMP and impatiently hunting it down: http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche The reason I was excited about "Our National Anthem" is not so much the music - I don't know the song - but because it is another Nitzsche track to add to the discography and search out. Thanks to Efram we have Gentle Soul's Pamela Polland describe the session and participants. Another problem: do I list it in Jack's discography, and, if so, in which category: 'cool vibes', 'spiritual influences' or Pamela's own (jokey) term 'Collective Consciousness'? Next week's battle will be a rather more straight ahead contest: Dorsey Burnette with "One Of The Lonely" versus Gary Crosby "Where The Blue Of The Night (Meets The Gold Of The Day)". Nitzsche Radio: http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/jacknitzscheradio is 48 seconds of late-night Bacharach style....chill. Martin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 14:05:47 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: "Lovesick Blues" Okay you got me as far as the writing, but if you ask anyone who knows "Lovesick Blues" who did it, the answer will usually be Hank Williams. Kind of like "Good Lovin'" will always be the Young Rascals to most of the public, not the Olympics. Of course in Spectropop Land, where the smallest details will surface eventually, this rule does not apply. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 17:18:45 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: "Lovesick Blues" > Hank Williams Jnr: > "Without a doubt my father learned Lovesick Blues somehow from Emmett > Miller. It was either by record or he heard him perform it in person > at a minstrel show." Nick Tosches illuminates on this confluence, with his usual articulateness and insight, in his recent book on Miller, Where Dead Voices Gather. As usual (again), Tosches uses the premise of Miller -- who he positions as an important transitional figure at the vortex of blues, hillbilly, minstrel and vaudeville (and perhaps a few other categories) -- as a platform from which to roam far and wide. In particular the book also serves as a meditation on the nature of artistic derivation and influence. What's most remarkable is that he's able to do all this despite the absence of virtually any factual information on Miller. Highly recommended for those interested in any of the above. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Sun, 02 Feb 2003 22:24:52 -0000 From: Jeff Lemlich Subject: Re: Fumbled projects Country Paul wrote about Pam Pollard: > I agree with her - this, along with Andy Pratt's "Avenging Annie," > is one of the top songs I know that should have been monster hits > and weren't. Interesting - both fumbled projects were on Columbia - > coincidence or conspiracy? :-) When I was program director of my college station, I had great ears for future hits... but one time I was quite wrong, and yes, the record was on Columbia: "In The Winter" by Janis Ian. Following up her biggest hit, I thought this couldn't miss! Jeff Lemlich http://www.limestonerecords.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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