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Spectropop - Digest Number 768



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                        Jamie LePage (1953-2002)
                  http://www.spectropop.com/Jamie.htm
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There are 24 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Little Jimmy Scott
           From: Simon White 
      2. Re: Who'da thought it?!
           From: Simon White 
      3. Honeychile Robinson info sought
           From: Neil Hever 
      4. Andy Pratt joke
           From: James F.  Cassidy 
      5. Who'da thought it?!
           From: Simon White 
      6. ATM records
           From: Guy Lawrence 
      7. Re: remixes of 60s music
           From: Patrick Rands 
      8. Re: Zaz Turned Blue
           From: Stewart Mason 
      9. Re: Mae West
           From: Joe Foster 
     10. Re: "She's All I Got"
           From: Artie Wayne 
     11. Re: Beatle-related songs.
           From: Artie Wayne 
     12. Re: "She's All I Got"
           From: Jeff Lemlich 
     13. Re: Honeychile Robinson info
           From: Phil Milstein 
     14. Richard Gottehrer - Charlie Gillett BBC radio show
           From: Stefan Wriedt 
     15. Duelling David Allens
           From: Phil Milstein 
     16. Re: Honeychile Robinson info sought
           From: James Botticelli 
     17. New group which might be of interest
           From: Richard Tearle 
     18. Re: Gentle Soul
           From: Efram Turchick 
     19. Re: Don Robertson; Tim Gilbert; Polyphonic Spree?
           From: Country Paul 
     20. Re: Sha Na Na; Extremes
           From: George Leonard 
     21. Re: James Brown
           From: James Botticelli 
     22. Re: Artie Wayne and The Beatles
           From: Guy Lawrence 
     23. Re: "She's All I Got"
           From: Nick Archer 
     24. Re: Zaz Turned Blue
           From: Steve Harvey 


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Message: 1
   Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 15:11:34 +0000
   From: Simon White 
Subject: Little Jimmy Scott

Nice to see Little Jimmy's "Falling In Love Is Wonderful" 
getting a play in The Liquid Room.

Whilst not really Spectropop [although it is at least sixties],
the recently re-released rare album of the same title is a 
wonderful collection of standards done in '63 and withdrawn 
quickly at the time.  Jimmy's voice and phrasing are extraordinary 
and influenced Nancy Wilson, Frankie Valli, Gloria Lynne and 
I'm informed, [by some one who knows about these things] that 
the first Barbra Streisand album sounds like Jimmy.  As I say,
I wouldn't know. Buy the album, or indeed anything else you see 
by him.  And if you get a chance to see him, just go.
It was a life changer for me. 




-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 15:19:09 +0000 From: Simon White Subject: Re: Who'da thought it?! Elisabeth wrote: > How about: Paul Anka "I can't help loving you" > The label says RCA 2498 (1974), but it *sounds* 60s and > oh-so-stompy blue-eyed soul. I can't remember the story > behind this one, but I'm sure someone here does. It sounded > really good when I just put it on now actually... Its a re-release you have there, just one of the many that were done for the Northern scene, legally and otherwise. It was a big Wigan Casino record and there's another version by Jimmy Breedlove on Roulette. Slower and more soul. I should know which is the original really. Paul has another Northern 45, but I've forgotten which one it is. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 15:37:02 -0000 From: Neil Hever Subject: Honeychile Robinson info sought Popsters, any truth to the story that Harry Belafonte began his career as Honeychile Robinson? A local shop has a 78 (vintage '53 or '54) on Capitol records. The owner claims it is a young Belafonte singing two jump R&B tunes. Anybody know about this? Cheers, Neil Hever -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 10:13:33 -0500 From: James F. Cassidy Subject: Andy Pratt joke When I was managing the Strawberries Records store in Framingham, MA in the late 70s, Andy Pratt (who lived nearby) used to come in from time to time. On one occasion, I pointed him out to the cashier, and when Andy came up to the cash register to pay for his albums, she said "Can I have your autograph?" The bashful Andy replied, "Who do you think I am, Livingston Taylor?" Jim Cassidy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 16:02:55 +0000 From: Simon White Subject: Who'da thought it?! To keep the ball rolling, of course this means they were played at some time on the Northern Soul scene, not that they are all Soul records! There are of course many more.... Johnny Mathis - Come Back Nat King Cole - The Good Times Al Martino - More Than The Eye Can See Eartha Kitt - There Comes A Time Judith Durham - Again And Again Tony Blackburn - I'll Do Anything Elvis Presley - Rubberneckin' Ral Donner - Don't Let It Slip Away Sammy Davis Jnr -You Can Count On Me [Vocal to Hawaii 5-0] Sammy Davis Jnr - The Shelter of Your Arms/Dont Shut Me Out Ted Cassidy - The Lurch Muriel Day - Nine Times Out Of Ten Bruce Forsythe - Keep Your Chin Up Julius Wechter - Along Comes Mary T.D Valentine - Love Trap Brian Hyland - The Joker Went Wild Derek And Ray - Interplay P.J. Proby - Niki Hokey Tom Jones - Stop Breaking My Heart Tom Jones - Can't Break The News to Myself Susan Maughan - That Other Place Cartoon Candy Carnival - Everything Is Mickey Mouse Andre Brasseur And His Multi Sound Organ - The Kid April Stevens - Wanting You The Shangri Las - Right Now And Not Later The Mike Post Coalition - Afternoon Of The Rhino Phil Coulter - Good Thing Going Lester Lanin Orchestra - Dizzy Mel Torme - Comin' Home Baby Nancy Wilson - The End Of Our Love The Skyliners - Everything Is Fine Connie Stevens - In The Deep Of Night Sam Butera -The Rat Race Bobby Callender - My Baby Changes Like The Weather Helen Shapiro - Stop And You Will Become Aware -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 16:27:45 -0000 From: Guy Lawrence Subject: ATM records I was on the ATM website (www.atm-records.de) lusting after their Hondells CDs when I noticed compilations of stuff by Carole King and Ellie Greenwich. Inexplicably there are no track listings for them at the site (nor for their probably excellent surf vocal collections) and a trawl through the Spectropop archives hasn't got me anywhere either. Am I the only one who missed these first time 'round? And can anyone help me out with some tracklistings? Can I also take this opportunity to thank whoever was responsible for playing the Full Treatment's "Just Can't Wait" to musica. An absolutely astounding track! Guy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 17:15:37 -0000 From: Patrick Rands Subject: Re: remixes of 60s music Billy G. Spradlin wrote: > Most 80's/90's dance remixes of original 60's hits just > dont work. I think in the past few years remixing has started to grow to even include good mixes of 60s material. Agreed, most of it has a funky feel to begin with, and the lack of multi-track versions probably hinders the mixers somewhat. I just heard a tremendous mix that included bits of "You Can't Hurry Love" by the Supremes and one of the surfing tunes by the Beach Boys - totally brilliantly done by Tim Love Lee. I guess my point being that the future of 60s remixes is bright and I think an area untapped for the most part. On a somewhat related note I love the Jackson 5 and Earth, Wind and Fire Japanese Soul Source remixes and would love to hear that treatment on a 60s singer - like Lesley Gore! :Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 12:18:47 -0500 From: Stewart Mason Subject: Re: Zaz Turned Blue Steve Harvey: > "Zaz Turned Blue" was a song I heard once and has > haunted me ever since. The fact that Mel Torme sang it > was really interesting. Sounds like something Michael > Brown would have collaborated on with Randy Newman and > Tom Leher. What the hell is the song about? The lyrics > sound as if they were written on the way to the > session and yet the melody is so beautiful. I keep > rewriting the lyrics in my head every time I play it. Bizarrely, I just bought a used CD of BORN TO LAUGH AT TORNADOES yesterday morning to replace my worn-to-death vinyl! "Zaz Turned Blue," like most of David Was' lyrics, makes very little literal sense, but basically, it's about a guy being strangled. This is one of the Was (Not Was)'s more normal songs, incidentally. The same album has a terrific '60s pop pastiche called "Smile," with lead vocals by the Knack's Doug Fieger (an old high school buddy of the Was brothers from their teenage years in Detroit) and some terrific twang guitar and Farfisa parts. Stewart -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 17:34:54 +0000 From: Joe Foster Subject: Re: Mae West I emailed my dear friend Ian Whitcomb about the recent queries on this one....here's what he said: "As to the questions: The backing band on 'Way Out West' was Somebody's Chyldren and they backed me on a couple of records for Tower in 1965. They were teenagers and led by David Allen, no relation to Davie Allen & The Arrows (also on Tower). They backed me live when I appeared at The Troubadour in the summer of 1966. The guitar on certain tracks on 'Way Out West' is none other than Glen Campbell! And it's me on organ and piano on some tracks. David Mallet (the producer) was an upper class English- man who had been Jack Good's assistant on "Shindig" and went on to manage me and produce my records, including 'Nervous'." So there we have it!...... all the best Joe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 09:37:04 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: "She's All I Got" Andrew...... I believe "Swamp Dogg" had the original record on it. I remember when Johnny Paycheck's record came out, Jerry came by my office at WB music and played it for me. I still like his version better....it has one of the best last verses ever written. regards, Artie Wayne -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 10:23:32 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Beatle-related songs. Guy Lawrence wrote: > I would strongly advise anyone interested in Beatle > novelty records to check out the following CD: > "Better Than The Beatles" Knight Records kcd1003 > ("26 Tunes That Failed To Oust The Fab-Four From > The Charts") Guy..... How ya' doin'? I'm curious - did my "You Can't Go Far Without A Guitar...Unless You're Ringo Starr" by Neil Sheppard on DCP records make the album? regards, Artie Wayne -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 18:37:34 -0000 From: Jeff Lemlich Subject: Re: "She's All I Got" Andrew Jones wrote: > During the early 1970s, country singer Johnny Paycheck had a > big country hit with a song called "(Friend, Don't Take Her) > She's All I Got." When I bought an old vinyl album with > Paycheck's version not long ago, I was surprised to see the > song was written by two R&B singers - Jerry "Swamp Dogg" > Williams and Gary U.S. Bonds! As far as I can tell, neither > writer did his own version of the song. Or did they? And did > any other R&B or soul singers do a version? The pair wrote the song for Freddie North, who took the song to #39 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1971. Jeff Lemlich http://www.limestonerecords.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 14:52:37 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Honeychile Robinson info Neil Hever wrote: > Popsters, any truth to the story that Harry Belafonte began > his career as Honeychile Robinson? A local shop has a 78 > (vintage '53 or '54) on Capitol records. The owner claims > it is a young Belafonte singing two jump R&B tunes. Anybody > know about this? Do you mean Sugarchile Robinson? If so, the Belafonte reference sounds like a canard. I recently had occasion to reread the notes to my Sugarchile LP on Charly, and seem to recall that he was marked AWOL after adolescence or perhaps early adulthood. Although the album was an '80s release, I would think that the Charly researchers would have already made the connection to Belafonte, had there been anything to it. If there is also a Honeychile Robinson and this, in fact, is who you mean, please disregard the above! --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 21:00:38 +0100 From: Stefan Wriedt Subject: Richard Gottehrer - Charlie Gillett BBC radio show Did anybody save the broadcast of Charlie Gillett's BBC radio show aired 18th January (Real Audio)? The show was the one featuring Richard Gottehrer - I was too late to catch the streamed version a week later. Any help is appreciated ... Thanks, Stefan Wriedt -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 15:08:42 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Duelling David Allens Ian Whitcomb wrote, via Joe Foster: > The backing band on 'Way Out West' was Somebody's Chyldren > and they backed me on a couple of records for Tower in 1965. > They were teenagers and led by David Allen, no relation to > Davie Allen & The Arrows (also on Tower). Could it be the future "Daevid" Allen of Gong, in that case? --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 14:45:51 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Honeychile Robinson info sought Neil Hever wrote: > Popsters, any truth to the story that Harry Belafonte began > his career as Honeychile Robinson? I'm not sure about that one, but it reminds me of one story that there IS truth to: That Louis Farrakhan began as a calypso singer in Mid-50s Boston JB/full of fun facts to know and tell -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 18:57:56 -0000 From: Richard Tearle Subject: New group which might be of interest A friend has just started a group which might be of interest to at least some of you - it's all for 60s bands who DIDN'T make it and I think if fills a gap in the many groups about the 60s....I'm sure those of you who, like me, followed the then scene can recall a few.... the group URL is: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/OBSCURE60sBANDS Cheers Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 14:25:43 -0500 From: Efram Turchick Subject: Re: Gentle Soul Martin Roberts: > "Me About You"...is not arranged by Jack [Nitzsche]...but by > Nick De Caro. I'm unaware of the credits on Gentle Soul's > 'Our National Anthem' but would be thrilled to add the track > to the discography if Jack is credited. Nice to see discussion of the Gentle Soul here! Some good news for those who'd like to hear more: Our upcoming CD reissue of the Gentle Soul album will be available March 25th. The reissue features nine bonus tracks in all (all of the single sides plus four unissued tracks, including a fantastic 1966 version of Jackson Browne's "Flying Thing"), previously unpublished photos, and the true story of the Gentle Soul as told by Pamela Polland and Rick Stanley! By the way, the original Epic/Columbia paperwork has no indication of any involvement from Nitzsche on "Our National Anthem" or "Song For Three." Regards, Efram Turchick Sundazed Music -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 14:31:46 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Re: Don Robertson; Tim Gilbert; Polyphonic Spree? Phil Milstein: > [The Twang Gang] also includes a hillbilly version of "Born > To Be With You", which the CD dates to Aug. '61. Wouldn't > that predate The Paris Sisters and Dion versions (not to > mention Dave Edmunds')? The author is Don Robertson -- did > he primarily work in the country market? "Born To Be With You" was originally a hit for the Chordettes on Cadence (entered the Billboard chart 6/5/56 and spent 20 weeks there peaking at #5). It was a strange blend of female barbershop harmony, folky acoustic guitar, and whistling! Robertson also wrote the Les Paul-Mary Ford hit "Hummingbird" credibly covered by the Chordettes (Cadence 1267, 1956 or 1957). There's so much depth and delicacy to much of their work. If you can find it, Barnaby Records reissued many of their best recordings on a "greatest hits" LP in 1976, although inexplicably leaving off their most beautiful - and most girl-group - song, "A Broken Vow," which was actually a low-charter c. 1961. (Incidentally, that song was written and originally recorded by The Bush Boys, two brothers named Bush, on Capitol, back in the adventurous purple-label days. No relation to the guys in the White House and Florida.) Don Robertson was indeed a Nashville cat, a major writer with major pop crossover. His first big hit was "The Happy Whistler," an early-mid 50s instrumental (again on Capitol) that you'd still recognize if you heard it. I was told that he was the original developer of what became known as the Floyd Cramer piano style, the two note lead with the melody under the root or fifth above, which was based a banjo pickin' style. He cut a mid-60s RCA 45 called "Pianjo" showcasing that style. He also wrote "Sea of Heartbreak," a country-pop-crossover hit for Don Gibson; the co-writer is the previously-discussed Paul Hampton. If you can find the Don Robertson album, "Heart On My Sleeve" (RCA LPM/LSP 3348, 1965), it has a dozen of Robertson's compositions, most of which were hits for him and others, including a nice re-cut of "Happy Whistler." (Among his best known: Eddy Arnold's "I Really Don't Want to Know"; Hank Locklin's "Please Help Me, I'm Falling"; Lorne Greene's "Ringo"; Hank Snow's "I Don't Hurt Anymore" and "90 Miles An Hour Down A Dead End Street"; and 14 songs recorded by some guy named Presley. NOT Reg. Even Jerry Springer [!] cut one of his songs.) A personal favorite is a 45 I signed off with every week on my first college radio shift: the obscure but gorgeous "What A Day," one of the most romantic pop-country songs ever to come out of Nashville. And if all this isn't enough, I just discovered http://www.donrobertson.com - no narratives, but some interesting lists. Back to "sunshine progressive": I have a 45 by Tim Gilbert on UNI 55045 (1968), produced by Frank Slay (Bob Crewe's former partner), and arranged by George Tipton. "If We Stick Together"/ "Early October" are both written by T.Gilbert/J. Carter; "Stick," the A-side, is a Dylanesque stream of consciousness sung in a voice a bit reminiscent of Peter Rowan's. I've always loved this track; anyone know anything about this artist? (A Google search revealed nothing.) From David Ponak's "Liquid Room" playlist: > Peter Gabriel/More Than This (Polyphonic Spree Mix) > More Than This (single) (Realworld-UK Really???!??? I saw "the Spree" live and even bought their album sound-unheard. I'm still trying to figure them out; I hear moments of brilliance dotting acres of self-indulgence. Are they a cult? trend? too clever for their own credibility? Is this remix done by them? Answers appreciated by the curious - me. Finally, while Richard Havers is proposing his Scottish Spectroparty, is there any word on the one pending for New York? Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 03 12:16:22 -0800 From: George Leonard Subject: Re: Sha Na Na; Extremes Country Paul: > ...then I see a post like George Leonard's. I've read both his bio links: > http://www.georgeleonard.com/corrected.html > http://www.georgeleonard.com/shanana_columbia_today.html > and wonder how I can keep up with guys like this. That's nice of you to say, Paul, but you know, that will never end? Whenever you reach a new level, you can see a bit higher, so you meet new people that make you feel small. My best friend now has a Pulitzer and a MacArthur Genius award; I work for Ron Howard, a legend in both TV and film; even my lawyer is bigger than I am. He used to be Oskar Schindler's lawyer and he was associate producer of Schindler's List with Spielberg. Yet I know that all of them look up the same way to Lucas! No matter what you achieve, you will always feel exactly the way you do now. You can see a certain distance up, and down. I notice you have a band so people probably bore you too with questions about what so and so was really like, but you've really said Rumplestiltskin to me. That is an extremely perceptive question. The invention of history. But let me see if I can find an email exchange with U. of Chicago Press from a year ago on that. Why "Country"? I'm sorry, I'm new to the list. What is your act like? Best, George -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 14:49:58 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: James Brown David Ponak wrote: > 17.James Brown/Sex Machine (Readymade Jazz Defector Mix) > Ultimate Remixes (Universal-Japan) I picked this one up recently and surprisingly it is remixed bossa nova style and works! Unsurprisingly it was the fine work of Konishi formerly of Pizzicato 5. We love you P5, oh yes we do! JB -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 22:19:15 -0000 From: Guy Lawrence Subject: Re: Artie Wayne and The Beatles Artie Wayne wrote: > Guy....How ya' doin'? I'm curious - did my "You Can't Go Far Without > A Guitar...Unless You're Ringo Starr" by Neil Sheppard on DCP records > make the album? (Better Than The Beatles kcd1003) Hi Artie, doing very well thanks. "You Can't Go Far" is not on "Better Than The Beatles" but it is compiled elsewhere - on the compilation "Flabby Road" alongside 25 other Beatle-novelties. I've only just found out about this album thanks to contact with a fellow Spectropopper who is a real expert on this wonderful genre. There are now three different volumes of this series but their legallity is questionable to say the least. That said, perhaps someone could play "You Can't Go Far" to Musica so we can all hear Artie's Beatle tribute. Regards, Guy. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 17:03:34 -0600 From: Nick Archer Subject: Re: "She's All I Got" > During the early 1970s, country singer Johnny Paycheck had a big country > hit with a song called "(Friend, Don't Take Her) She's All I Got." As > far as I can tell, neither writer did his own version of the song. Or > did they? And did any other R&B or soul singers do a version? How does > it compare to Paycheck's (if you've heard it)? Oh Yeah, Freddie North on Mankind Records here in Nashville! I have a mint 45 I can play to musica in the morning. Also, didn't Ronnie Milsap do a version later? Nick Archer Check out Nashville's classic SM95 on the web at www.live365.com/stations/nikarcher -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Wed, 29 Jan 2003 15:24:22 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Zaz Turned Blue "Smile" is a great tune and supposedly has Marshall Crenshaw on the vocals too, but I can't hear him. Some good stuff on the record. The lyrics to "Zaz" kind of disappoint me because they sound like they were written off the cuff. Great music, but ok lyrics. The Flamin' Groovies use to write such great tunes then attach so-so lyrics. I recall Cyril saying something once about the words not being important. Wish he'd taken a little more time on them, however. They're the icing on the cake so to speak. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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