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Spectropop - Digest Number 684



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______________        S  P  E  C  T  R  O  P  O  P        ______________
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                        Jamie LePage (1953-2002)
                  http://www.spectropop.com/Jamie.htm
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There are 16 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. He's So Fine My Lord
           From: Leonardo Flores 
      2. Seven Day Weekend
           From: Ian Chapman 
      3. Jack Nitzsche at Spectropop (update)
           From: Martin Roberts 
      4. Re: Seven-Day Weekend
           From: Stewart Mason 
      5. Re: He's So Fine My Lord
           From: Phil Chapman 
      6. Re: The Verve "Bittersweet Symphony"
           From: Bryan 
      7. Re: He's So Fine / My Sweet Lord
           From: Bill Craig 
      8. Re: Seven Day Weekend
           From: Phil Milstein 
      9. Re: It's Trad Dad - the movie
           From: Mike Edwards 
     10. Re: self-plagiarism?
           From: Phil Milstein 
     11. Re: He's So Fine / My Sweet Lord
           From: Eddy Smit 
     12. Re: Todds, Ralke & others
           From: Country Paul 
     13. Re: The Escorts
           From: James Botticelli 
     14. Ye Ye Girls
           From: Country Paul 
     15. The All-American Solid Gold Show 2002
           From: Ian Slater 
     16. The Rock Flowers
           From: Nick Archer 


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Message: 1
   Date: Sat, 23 Nov 2002 00:59:06 -0000
   From: Leonardo Flores 
Subject: He's So Fine My Lord

Hello,
Anybody hear the Chiffons cover of the Harrison song? 
It was on the Ace CD a few years ago. 
Production wise they are worlds apart but the melody is 
very similer in my opinion. 
Cheers
LF
PS Thanks Mick for the info. Cheers!



-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sat, 23 Nov 2002 01:22:40 -0000 From: Ian Chapman Subject: Seven Day Weekend Mike Edwards wrote: > Searching under 'seven day' brought up a song that's not > too far from my mental turntable on a Friday evening: Gary > US Bonds - "Seven Day Weekend". What a song that is! It certainly is Mike. Did you ever see it performed by Gary in the UK pop-flick "It's Trad, Dad"? (Which, by the way, starred the currently topical Helen Shapiro as the female lead). Same movie that also featured the amazing footage of the Paris Sisters doing the Spector-produced "What Am I To Do", and the even more amazing tableau of Gene McDaniels enshrouded in his own cigarette smoke as he delivers "Another Tear Falls". Ian -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Fri, 22 Nov 2002 21:02:36 -0000 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Jack Nitzsche at Spectropop (update) Another 'Record Of The Week', another musical treat, this time courtesy of The Escorts on RCA. Three Nitzsche arrangements from their two 60s 45s on Nipper's label - the odd one out arranged Perry Botkin. Every one of them is pure class. Any hits? Nah! But I'm sure that won't put you off having a listen. Thanks to Phil C's techno skills and oblique references, "Nitzsche's Monkey" is this week's radio jingle. Bemused? Don't be, give it a listen on Nitzsche Radio. A 'Record Review' has been added from our own Country Paul. Thanks CP. Martin http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/index.htm -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Fri, 22 Nov 2002 20:30:20 -0500 From: Stewart Mason Subject: Re: Seven-Day Weekend Mike Edwards asks: >Searching under 'seven day' brought up a song that's not too >far from my mental turntable on a Friday evening: Gary US Bonds >- "Seven Day Weekend". What a song that is! I see the same title >by Elvis Costello, Jimmy Cliff and Foghat. Couldn't be the same >song, could it? Can't speak for the Foghat tune, but the Elvis Costello/Jimmy Cliff collaboration is an original song co-written by the pair for some forgettable mid-'80s comedy. S -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Sat, 23 Nov 2002 01:34:55 -0000 From: Phil Chapman Subject: Re: He's So Fine My Lord Leonardo Flores: > Anybody hear the Chiffons cover of the Harrison song? > Production wise they are worlds apart but the melody is > very similar in my opinion. Enter Jody Miller, with her version of "He's So Fine", featuring a doubled acoustic rhythm track, and cheeky guitar quotes from "My Sweet Lord". It's on more than one of her CDs, so I'll only play the relevant section to musica. And yes, the two songs are similar, as are many other examples in the pop world. But plagiarism is not worth a lawsuit unless there's plenty of money to be made, and, judging by that report, Klein certainly made sure he would, whatever the outcome. The worst example of this kind of litigious behaviour surely has to be the recent case over the Verve's "Bittersweet Symphony" - The band were honest (stupid) enough to own up to using a sample from one of Andrew Oldham's instrumental versions of a Stones track. The actual line was from a fee-paid string arrangement job by David Whitaker. But Klein holds the copyright to the Stones catalogue, and demanded, and got, 100% of the royalty, before licensing it to Nike. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Fri, 22 Nov 2002 19:45:45 -0800 From: Bryan Subject: Re: The Verve "Bittersweet Symphony" > The worst example of this kind of litigious behaviour > surely has to be the recent case over the Verve's > "Bittersweet Symphony" - The band were honest (stupid) > enough to own up to using a sample from one of Andrew > Oldham's instrumental versions of a Stones track. The > actual line was from a fee-paid string arrangement job > by David Whitaker. There's a nice article here on composer/arranger David Sinclair Whitaker: http://www.sospubs.co.uk/sos/jan01/articles/david.asp More trivial info about "Bittersweet Symphony": the orchestra conductor who conducted the string arrangements for the Verve was none other than Wil Malone, of the Robb Storme And The Whispers (also Robb Storme Group) and Orange Bicycle ("Hyacinth Threads"). Bryan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sat, 23 Nov 2002 04:12:00 -0000 From: Bill Craig Subject: Re: He's So Fine / My Sweet Lord With regard to the My Sweet Lord/He's So Fine controversy, I remember the first time I heard the George Harrison tune just as it was released. I immediately recognized it as being essentially the same as He's So Fine, but thought; O.K. I get it, "My sweet Lord,He's so fine". I assumed that the connection was totally intentional and would be acknowledged and included in the writing credits. This is no knock on George,who's work I love.Maybe the connection was truly unconscious. R.I.P. Bill Craig -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Fri, 22 Nov 2002 23:27:08 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Seven Day Weekend Ian Chapman wrote: > It certainly is Mike. Did you ever see it performed by Gary > (U.S. Bonds) in the UK pop-flick "It's Trad, Dad"? Which was Richard Lester's feature directorial debut. After finally viewing it recently I wondered whether Lester shot the American acts, which also included Del Shannon and Gene Vincent, or whether they were originally shot for another project but licensed for use in It's Trad Dad for whatever reason. Another possibility is that they were intended for It's Trad Dad but even still were shot by a 2nd unit director, probably in the U.S. Stylistically they don't resemble what is obviously Lester's handiwork on the U.K. acts, and as far as I know the Paris Sisters never appeared overseas. By the way, the New York Dolls also recorded Seven Day Weekend, in demo form finally released during the '80s. Dolls guitarist Johnny Thunders interpolated it into his later solo repertoire, as well. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Fri, 22 Nov 2002 23:24:19 -0500 From: Mike Edwards Subject: Re: It's Trad Dad - the movie It's Trad, Dad? Yes I do know and love that film (US title: Ring A Ding Rhythm) especially the part where David Jacobs introduces the acts (Gary US Bonds, The Paris Sisters, Del Shannon, Chubby Checker and Gene McDaniels) at a supper club with Helen Shapiro, Craig Douglas and Mari Fabrizi (struggling with his spaghetti) in the audience. I think that the director, Dick "A Hard Day's Night" Lester came to the US to shoot these acts because you do not see them interacting with the audience. I got some movie stills from somewhere in Canada and have posted two of them to the photo section of Spectropop. There you can see Gary US Bonds, Del Shannon, Gene Vincent, Chubby Checker, Helen Shapiro and Craig Douglas. Anyone looking for a synopsis and review of this film should go to the Internet Movie Database, where someone has posted a very solid review: http://us.imdb.com/Title?0055026#comment The film is highly regarded by Marshall Crenshaw in his book, Hollywood Rock: "Richard Lester's first movie is nearly as much fun as AHDN, containing almost as many jokes per shot as his subsequent Beatles movie - as well as a lot of dazzling camera tricks, besides. The pacing is quick, the attitude is cynical and not even the clunky acting of Craig Douglas and Helen Shapiro can slow down the proceedings." I have videotapes of both titles (US and UK) and, this year being the film's fortieth anniversary, I have watched them a couple of times. The pop songs are state of the art for 1962 and even the trad jazz tunes are fun. Crenshaw omits the Paris Sisters' "What Am I To Do" from his song tally and, originally, I had a hard time identifying it. I finally figured it out with the help of James Doyle's Paris Sisters' discography in Philately # 6. I intended to announce this on Spectropop one day (it has to be one of the very few times one of Phil's songs has been performed on film) but as Mary Wells says, Ian, you beat me. Along with those above, I highly recommend this film to Spectropoppers. PS - thanks to Stewart Mason for pointing out that the Elvis Costello/Jimmy Cliff title is not the same song as US Bonds'. Mike Edwards -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Fri, 22 Nov 2002 23:32:34 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: self-plagiarism? Phil Chapman wrote: > The worst example of this kind of litigious behaviour > surely has to be the recent case over the Verve's > "Bittersweet Symphony" I don't know, Saul Zaentz's suing John Fogerty on a charge of self-plagiarism (?!) over the similarities between Old Man Down The Road to Green River (I think it was) might top Phil C.'s example for pure litigous audacity. Do you suppose that if Old Man (by some quirk) had been released on Fantasy Zaentz would still have been PO'd? Not to mention the fact that, like any good stylist, every third song Fogerty wrote was right down in the same swamp as those two. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sat, 23 Nov 2002 07:51:32 +0100 From: Eddy Smit Subject: Re: He's So Fine / My Sweet Lord Mary S: > I have always been shocked by the lawsuit being successful. I have > never felt that "He's So Fine" and "My Sweet Lord" sounded very > much alike except perhaps on about three notes - hardly enough to > get excited about. THANK YOU, MARY !!! I do stand corrected on the Tim Hardin/Rose, tho'. My brain cell was otherwise engaged. Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sat, 23 Nov 2002 01:56:19 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Re: Todds, Ralke & others F. Wright: > I have an Art & Dotty Todd LP on Dot DLP 25742 titled "Chanson d'Amour". > It contains a stereo re-recording of their hit.... Like you, I distrust "remakes for money." As for the lounge-y other stuff, I liked the Todds' harmonies when they sang straight, but having a verging-on-rock background (Wayne Shanklin's sound, or the straight doo-wop nacking of "Wait For Me") added tremendous character to their rich harmony. So many of the follow-up 45's to "Chanson" tried to repeat the gimmicks of the hit, but they felt "strapped on" to the arrangements and undermined the performances. F. Wright again: > I never thought of Don Ralke as "exotica". After beefing up Jan & Arnie's > "Jennie Lee", he directed many of the early Warner Bros. records by Edd > Byrnes, Connie Stevens, Dick & Dee Dee, Joanie Sommers, and Tab Hunter. > They were billed on the label 'with the BIG SOUND of Don Ralke.' Indeed, I'd thought him to be more of a pop producer too, but I erred in my thinking - there's a lot more going on. Judging by some of his album titles, a major vein of exotica flowed through him. Here's a bio and partial discography: http://www.spaceagepop.com/ralke.htm. Among his accomplishments was working with a variety of "golden throats" (Phil Milstein take note) including but not limited to Edd "Kookie" Byrnes, Lorne Green and William Shatner. He was also the principal composer for The Mystic Moods Orchestra. He just passed away in 2000. Other interesting citations: Guy Lawrence already mentioned the Sunrays. From a Jesse Belvin discography, "Modern 1005: Goodnight My Love (Pleasant Dreams) / I Want You With Me Christmas, Oct 1956. Probably recorded with The Don Ralke Singers, including Ricki Page, wife of producer George Motola." (Incidentally, the huge hit was re-released as Jamie 1145 in 1959.) Also, the Ralke-arranged Edd Byrnes album has been released by Collectors Choice on CD. There's an interesting Byrnes bio, by the way, at: http://shopping.yahoo.com/shop?d=product&id=1927046749&clink=dmmu.artist&a=b Ian Chapman, since you talked with Brian Hyland, I'm curious what he thinks about "Come Away With Me" on Dot, possibly his most atypical 45. Artie Wayne: > Let's not forget "Little Children" [Pomus/ Shuman] by Billy J. Kramer. My favorite track ever by the artist. Nice call on that one.... Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sat, 23 Nov 2002 01:45:44 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: The Escorts > Another 'Record Of The Week', another musical treat, > this time courtesy of The Escorts on RCA. Three Nitzsche > arrangements from their two 60s 45s on Nipper's label - > the odd one out arranged Perry Botkin. Every one of them > is pure class. Any hits? Nah! But I'm sure that won't put > you off having a listen: > http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/index.htm No...and thank you..WE are truly onto something big. It's fantabulashiositotimo that we have uncovered this corner of neglected "Neglectia" -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sat, 23 Nov 2002 02:16:53 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Ye Ye Girls Found this fan site about the "ye ye girls," which I thought might be appropriate based on recent discussions of French artists: http://members.tripod.com/ye_ye_girls/home.html http://www.frankenstein.com/ has some Francoise Hardy info as well. Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sat, 23 Nov 2002 08:47:47 -0000 From: Ian Slater Subject: The All-American Solid Gold Show 2002 I's been mentioned before, Just a reminder to other UK residents of this fabulous show which continues to tour the UK until 8th December. Catch them while you can! I caught them at Hereford yesterday in a packed Leisure Centre. All the acts were terrific and very willing to chat, sign records etc. after the show. Take cash or a cheque book with card though as the sales stand doesn't take credit cards and you'll be tempted by the CDs on offer! They were interested to see original vinyl, especially UK issues. Brian Hyland said "hey guys look at this" on seeing the Sealed With A kiss / Ginny EP and Judy Craig Mann (Chiffons) was interested to see the UK release of the He's so Fine LP. She was even more interested in the "My Secret Love" LP which she didn't know existed! She did remember the tracks though and did have her own copies of them. The Big Bopper Jr. explained he never knew his father who died in the tragic air crash a couple of months or so before he was born but he was really good, a voice rather like his father. He did "Running Bear" and explained that his Dad had done backing vocals to Johnny Preston who has now done backing vocals on his own recording on his new CD! Brian Hyland was a great rocker, as well as the doing the ballads and that novelty record, by which he is best rembered. Chris Montez was the opening big act, in great voice and full of energy, grabbing some partners off the front row to dance with him during "Let's Dance"! Bobby was the last star I got to speak to. He was particularly chatty. I congratulated him and all for such a wonderful, fresh and energetic show in such a busy schedule. He said he really appreciated that but that it wasn't hard as they were all great friends and loved working together. A wonderful note to end a wonderful evening. Ian Slater -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Fri, 22 Nov 2002 22:39:29 -0600 From: Nick Archer Subject: The Rock Flowers I just bought an album by the Rock Flowers on Wheel records, a division of Ringling Brothers Barnum & Bailey Circus. I haven't listened to it yet, but it's produced by Wes Farrell, and features Wrecking Crew musicians. Does anyone know the story of this group? Nick Archer Nashville Check out Nashville's classic SM95 on the web at www.live365.com/stations/289419 -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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