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Spectropop - Digest Number 681



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______________        S  P  E  C  T  R  O  P  O  P        ______________
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                        Jamie LePage (1953-2002)
                  http://www.spectropop.com/Jamie.htm
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: A Christmas Gift, Lee Hazlewood, Then Lou Kissed Me
           From: Guy Lawrence 
      2. Girl Groups T-shirts
           From: Louis Wendruck 
      3. Artie Wayne on record
           From: Mike Edwards 
      4. Re: American artist, overseas-only hit
           From: Phil Chapman 
      5. Re: My Sweet Lord Plagiarism Suit
           From: Artie Wayne 
      6. musica-Caroline Munro
           From: Mark Wirtz   aka, Michael Sinclair 
      7. Re: how can they do that?
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
      8. Re: the Detergents
           From: Artie Wayne 
      9. re: Hermans Hermits
           From: Eddy Smit 
     10. Re: American artist, overseas-only hit
           From: Mike Miller 
     11. Re: American artist, overseas-only hit
           From: Eddy Smit 
     12. Re: Helen Shapiro/Norrie Paramor
           From: Mark Wirtz   aka, Michael Sinclair 
     13. Re: how can they do that?
           From: Frank 
     14. Mina
           From: Mick Patrick 
     15. Re: Brian Hyland
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
     16. Re: American artist, overseas-only hit
           From: Ron Sauer 
     17. re: Soft Sounds For Gentle People - track listing
           From: Ted L. 
     18. Re: Graham Gouldman
           From: Artie Wayne 
     19. re: American artist, overseas-only hit
           From: Marc Miller 
     20. Re: how can they do that?
           From: Eddy Smit 
     21. Re: Brian Hyland
           From: Eddy Smit 
     22. Where does a rock n roll fan go to get "Where does a rock n  roll singer go"?
           From: Phil Milstein 
     23. Re: Herman's Hermits
           From: Scott Swanson 
     24. Re: Freddie & The Dreamers
           From: Peter Lerner 
     25. Re: Lee Hazlewood / Lou Reed / Gene Pitney
           From: Phil Milstein 


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Message: 1
   Date: Fri, 25 Oct 2002 06:12:12 -0700
   From: Guy Lawrence 
Subject: Re: A Christmas Gift, Lee Hazlewood, Then Lou Kissed Me

As promised I have details on this year's British release of the 
Christmas album. It's official re-release date is 25th of November 
- I say 'official' as last years stock is still on the shelves in 
many stores. It's full price (around 16.99), the catalogue number 
is 665112 and it's distributed by Universal. 
Ace records Lee Hazlewood CD is now out and is a real treat. It 
makes the recent "Lounge Legends" album redundant as it includes 
everything Lee did for MGM. Also included are three Alpertesque 
instrumentals by Lee Hazlewood's Woodchucks, a thrilling photo of 
Suzi Jane Hokum and a couple of Spector anecdotes in the excellent 
sleevenotes.

Tying up two recent threads, the intro to "Then He Kissed Me" of course 
forms the riff to "The Ostrich" by The Primitives. The information on 
Lou Reed's pre-Velvets work dug up here recently was top notch, however, 
it begs the question - why isn't there a compilation of this stuff 
available legally? I'm sure it would be a big seller. Out of interest, 
can any of the reissue label people out there outline the work involved 
in such a project?

Regards, Guy.



-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Wed, 20 Nov 2002 21:42:21 +0000 From: Louis Wendruck Subject: Girl Groups T-shirts See photos of the Girl Group T-shirts for sale at this website: http://surf.to/girlgroupstshirts Or email me for more info: girlgrouptshirts@surf.to Louis Wendruck -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Wed, 20 Nov 2002 23:52:56 -0000 From: Mike Edwards Subject: Artie Wayne on record Artie mentions a Brian Poole & The Tremeloes b-side composed by D.Jordan/J.Powers/A.Wayne. Artie, did two of these writers form the duo Jordan & Wayne who cut a nice teen ballad, "Find A Little Happiness" on Diamond in 1962? In which case are you the Wayne singing on this? Ian Chapman inquired "can you tell us who did the U.S. original of "Queen For Tonight"? Was there a male version by Barry Darvell?" Artie, you kindly answered that QFT was an original by Helen Shapiro (which started some interesting threads in Spectropop). I am pretty sure that the great and underrated Barry Darvell song, King For Tonight, was written by Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman. However, you do have a King For Tonight in your catalog. Was this the same song as Helen's and do you know if anyone recorded it? Finally, anyone flipping over Wayne Newton's Danke Schoen is in for a nice surprise, because there resides a top-notch teen ballad, Better Now Than Later, from yourself and Ben Raleigh. It comes from that period when Mr. Las Vegas' career was under the direction of Bobby Darin. Thanks for this one. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 16:25:28 -0000 From: Phil Chapman Subject: Re: American artist, overseas-only hit Phil Milstein: > To try to get one tangential ball rolling, how big a UK hit > was Gene Pitney's original (?) take on "That Girl Belongs To > Yesterday"? Hi Phil, it got to number 7 or so in the UK around March/April 1964. (United Atrtists UP 1045). I thought it *was* the plug side of the US release (Musicor 1036)? I really like this Jagger/Richards tune, but my question is: does anybody have this in stereo *with* the self- duetting harmony part as on the 45, or did Andrew Oldham overdub it onto the final mono mix? And in a similar vein: is there a stereo release of PJ Proby's "I Can't Make It Alone" with the Righteous Brothers'-style self-duetting harmony, as on the 45? Phil -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 08:30:58 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: My Sweet Lord Plagiarism Suit Bryan......Thanks for posting the details of the "He's So Fine/ "My Sweet Lord" law suit I always wondered what happened. Although we went to the same church,I only met Ronnie Mack, the writer of "He's So Fine"...once...as he lay dying in a N.Y.hospital in 1963. I was one of the volounteers there to donate blood.... that's where I first met Hank Medress,who produced the Chiffons with the Tokens, who was lying on the table beside me. It's a shame that neither Ronnie or his mother, who passed away about ten years ago, ever saw the rewards from classic song. regards, Artie Wayne -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 06:21:50 -0000 From: Mark Wirtz aka, Michael Sinclair Subject: musica-Caroline Munro Well, having been so negative about my "Tar And Cement" production with Caroline Munro (who, ironically, is being featured in this week's "E" special on "The Bond Girls"), I am happy to concede that, thanks to listening to Martin Robert's posting of his copy on musica, the record actually sounds fairly decent. I based my prior disdain on an acetate I had, which, it turns out, was an early rough reference mix of the track (Martin's copy is an actual release copy). I not only can sleep better now, but I even gave my blessing to Mark Frumento's plan to include the recording on a probable "Pop Works II" comp. Ta, Martin :) Mark W. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 09:52:50 -0000 From: Billy G. Spradlin Subject: Re: how can they do that? Dave Swanson: > On a similar note, check out the first song on side one of > The Osmonds album "Crazy Horses" called "Hold Her Tight"... > it is a blatant rip off of Led Zep's "Immigrant Song". Seriously! Also compare the Osmonds "Crazy Horses" to Aeromsith's "Back In The Saddle Again". Who's stealing from whom here? Donnie Osmond had a MGM B-side in the early 70's (written by the older Osmond Bros) called "Love Me" which almost directly rips off the intro and horn charts of Chicago's "25 to 6 To 4". One of my favorite steals is the Rubinoos swipe of the Stones "Hey You!" shout on thier "I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend" (one of my favorite Power Pop singles). Another fave is master thief Noel Gallagher's swipe of the melody of Wham's "Freedom" in Oasis' "Fade Away". Billy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 08:09:58 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: the Detergents I've misplaced the original e-mail,but I was asked if I had anything to do with the Detergents "Leader of the Laundramat" ...No I didn't. But... Danny Jordan,one of the members of the group, was one of my first songwriting partners and we had one single on Diamond records "Find a little Happiness" as Jordan and Wayne. regards, Artie Wayne -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 06:09:01 +0100 From: Eddy Smit Subject: re: Hermans Hermits Norman: > The group did the touring but not the recording. Any > suggestions on who played on those sessions? John Paul Jones was on their records. Apparently so was Jimmy Page on a few sessions, but I'd love to hear from anybody who might have more specific details on that. Clem Cattini is a likely contender for the drum spot on a lot of stuff. Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Wed, 20 Nov 2002 19:03:25 EST From: Mike Miller Subject: Re: American artist, overseas-only hit Phil, I do not know much about the uk charts, but I was recently introduced to this song by Gene Pitney and it is a great song with a terrific arrangement. There was so much good music in that era that much of it went by without a listen. Shame. mike miller, doowopdaddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 06:27:14 +0100 From: Eddy Smit Subject: Re: American artist, overseas-only hit Phil M: > To try to get one tangential ball rolling, how big a UK hit > was Gene Pitney's original (?) take on "That Girl Belongs To > Yesterday"? That girl belongs to yesterday was an A-side c/w Who needs it: United Artists UP 1045 in the UK (got to number 7 in the charts), but also in the USA on Musicor 1036 (same B-side). Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 06:32:43 -0000 From: Mark Wirtz aka, Michael Sinclair Subject: Re: Helen Shapiro/Norrie Paramor Mick Patrick wrote: > Helen Shapiro's recording of the Spector/Pomus-penned "I Can't > Say No To Your Kiss" is available on the EMI CD "Helen Shapiro > At Abbey Road, 1961-1967" (4 93452 2). Did Norrie Paramor produce and arrange these tracks? Gotta get hold of this comp - Helen Shapiro was one of the few UK artists whose records I really loved, at a time when the majority of my "faves" were American records. To me, Norrie Paramor, by the way, was always the UK Don Costa; a supreme music maestro who, sadly, has been shamefully ignored by music history. At the risk of evoking a slew of wrath, George Martin couldn't even fit into Norrie's shadow. Mark (Wirtz) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 07:47:07 +0100 From: Frank Subject: Re: how can they do that? Eddy: > I don't think "He's So Fine" and "My Sweet Lord" are *that* similar. Not similar !! Really, listen again, it's practically the same song. Even George admitted it. And I can tell you that at the time the song got released in the UK it got really heavy airplay and was a favorite in every discotheque around the country. You really couldn't escape the song even if you wanted to. Frank -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 08:45:38 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Mina Mike Edwards: > What an impressive list of songs Ben Raleigh has to his credit > (his name is coming up a lot recently). I have not yet been able > to nail a copy of Mina's "Just Let Me Cry" (Barkan-Raleigh), > which has been talked up on this site. Any chance of a listen? You're in luck, Mike, because Mina's version of the Mark Barkan/Ben Raleigh song "Just Let Me Cry" is available on CD - "Mina: Canta In Inglese" (Carosello CARSM025-2, Italy). The label has a website: http://www.carosellorecords.com and I've seen the CD for sale at Tower and HMV in London. But if all that fails, do what I did, get one of your lovely chums to pop over to Rome and bag one for you. The track was recorded in the USA with arranger/conductor Klaus Ogerman in 1962, the year before Lesley Gore's rendition. It might be the original but is lacking the great handclaps which make the "It's My Party" gal's version such a work of art. Mina was already a star in Italy by this time. In fact, she had even registered a small hit in the USA in 1961 with "This World We Live In", released on the Time label. However, the "Canta In Inglese" CD, which comprises tracks from the early-60s, is certainly worth acquiring for Mina's version of the ultra rare Ellie Greenwich/Ben Raleigh song "Talk About Me". This sounds as if it was also cut in the USA c.1962. In fact, my ears tell me that the backing vocalists are none other than the Cookies. This song has great lyrics. Cop this: You talk about the engine in your brand new car, You tell me what you saw on TV, Well, if you want some lovin' tonight, You better talk about me, talk about me. You talk about the greedy girl you used to date, You tell me 'bout your family, If you expect to hold me real tight, You better talk about me, talk about me. Be warned, the legendary Mina is still very active and currently has over SIXTY cds in catalogue! Can my credit card stand it? A larger than life character, her image becomes more extreme with each successive album cover. MICK PATRICK -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 09:32:27 -0000 From: Billy G. Spradlin Subject: Re: Brian Hyland James Botticelli: > It doesn't say where it was cut, but what it does say is that > arrangements were by Leon Russell and Al Capps, production by > Snuff Garrett, and engineers were Dave Hassinger and Henry > Lewy. I believe Dave Hassinger worked for L.A.'s RCA studios during the mid 60s - his engineering for the Rolling Stones (especially their "Aftermath" LP) and The Jefferson Airplane is well respected. PS: "3000 miles" is a great single - first heard it in my Uncles 45s collection. Bryan Hyland is one of those aritsts who made many great records but gets little respect - his Everly Brothers-like version of "Save Your Heart For Me" is far better than Gary Lewis' and should have been a hit for him (it was a flip-side!) Billy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 14:04:46 -0000 From: Ron Sauer Subject: Re: American artist, overseas-only hit Phil Milstein wrote: > To try to get one tangential ball rolling, how big a UK hit > was Gene Pitney's original (?) take on "That Girl Belongs To > Yesterday"? I don't believe it charted at all in the U.S., > and for all I know (although I'm sure someone else does) > it didn't even appear on the plug-side of a 45. Gene's record did chart in the US, although it peaked the 40's. I believe it was issue with a picture sleeve. This was always one of my favorite of his records. The thing I wonder about is the vocal track. On my single and on the "It Hurts to Be in Love (US)" vinyl LP, Gene's vocal is double tracked. On every CD issue save one that I've been able to find, his voice is single tracked. The 2fer CDs issues in England some years back have the single track on the regular album, and the double track as a bonus track on a different cd. Was the British single release in the 60's the single track or double track? And why was it so hard to find the double track? Ron -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 10:46:02 -0500 From: Ted L. Subject: re: Soft Sounds For Gentle People - track listing About a month ago, I inquired about the track listing for this compilation advertised in the current issue of Ugly Things. JJ (of Fading Yellow fame) http://www.beatbehindthedykes.com/FY.html came through with this info that some of you might be interested in. Ted L. Soft Sounds For Gentle People - track listing Moorpark Intersection-I Think I'll Just Go And Find Myself A Flower The Avant Garde-Naturally Stoned Jim & Dale-Past the State of Mind The Stained Glass-My Buddy Sin The Pleasure Fair-Today Hyle King Movement-Flower Smile Brigadune-(I'll Cry Out From My Grave) God I'm Sorry The Deep Six-C'mon Baby Paper Fortress-Sleepy Hollow People Serendipity Singers-Love Is A State of Mind Thorinshield-Brave New World Lewis & Clark Expedition-Blue Revelations Marcus-Grains of Sand Stone Country-Mantra The Parade-ACDC Rich Kids-Plastic Flower Peppermint Trolley Company- 9 O'Clock Business Man Harper & Rowe-Here Comes Yesterday Again The Fun & Games-It Must Have Been the Wind The Fireballs-Groovy Motions Underground Sunshine-Take Me, Break Me Fargo-Cross With No Name Appletree Theater-You're the Biggest Thing In My Life Direct all inquiries to: petrecords@hotmail.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 07:52:58 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Graham Gouldman Jeff....You're right Graham Gouldman did have the first recording of "One by One" with the Mockingbirds.....given to him by our U.S. sub-publisher.....before I recorded it as Shadow Mann. I remember Garry Sherman and Stanley Kahan produced my "Automated man" for SMASH ,but I don't remember who played on it. regards, Artie Wayne -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 11:03:07 -0500 From: Marc Miller Subject: re: American artist, overseas-only hit Phil M: > To try to get one tangential ball rolling, how big a UK hit > was Gene Pitney's original (?) take on "That Girl Belongs To > Yesterday"? I don't believe it charted at all in the U.S., > and for all I know (although I'm sure someone else does) > it didn't even appear on the plug-side of a 45. Gene Pitney's version of That Girl Belongs to Yesterday did chart in the US - it hit #49 in January of '64. Marc -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 18:39:07 +0100 From: Eddy Smit Subject: Re: how can they do that? I'm not saying "He's So Fine" and "My Sweet Lord" are NOT similar...I said they're not *that* similar. The fact that the author of the lawsuit article also writes that he didn't even connect both songs until he had heard about the lawsuit, bears me out on this. Nevertheless, it's only my opinion. In any case, I've heard more blatant rip-offs ! How about the Box Tops' "Yesterday where's my mind" and Tim Hardin's "Morning dew" ??!! Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 18:44:02 +0100 From: Eddy Smit Subject: Re: Brian Hyland Billy G. Spradlin: > I believe Dave Hassinger worked for L.A.'s RCA studios during > the mid 60s - his engineering for the Rolling Stones (especially > their "Aftermath" LP) and The Jefferson Airplane is well respected. Dave Hassinger wasn't exclusive to RCA. You're right about the Airplane and the Stones, but he also worked with the Grateful Dead, where, as legend has it, he walked out on the production of their second album because he couldn't handle the chaos. Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 15:17:36 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Where does a rock n roll fan go to get "Where does a rock n roll singer go"? My attempt to purchase a copy of the CD boot on which appeared Artie Wayne's "Where Does A Rock 'N' Roll Singer Go?" was met with the following reply today from a German supplier: > I'm sorry but just today we did get a note from the distributor of > all the Teen Town CDs in Germany that the company in England who made > these CDs is bankrupt(!) Sad news, as I'd been almost equally eager to hear its companion tracks on the CD. Could any S'popper play the track to musica? --Phil Milstein Admin Note: Teen Town label CDs can be purchased from http://www.bim-bam.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 13:46:21 -0800 From: Scott Swanson Subject: Re: Herman's Hermits Mikey writes: > Norman, actually, The Hermits played on 80% of the records. The > remaining 20% were done with Jimmy Page, Clem Cattinni, etc, the > normal Micky Most session crew. I believe it's only the first few > hits (excluding Show Me Girl) that use the session guys. This info > came from Barry Whitwam, the drummer for Hermans Hermits since 1963. Interestingly, Peter Noone says it's the other way around -- 20% featuring the Hermits, 80% featuring sessions guys. As John Paul Jones once said, "I used to do Herman's Hermits and all that. I mean they were never there; you could do a whole album in a day. And it was great fun and a lot of laughs." Some of the "confirmed" session men on Herman's Hermits songs include: Jim Sullivan (several sessions, 1964-68) John Paul Jones (just about every session from 1966-68) Jimmy Page (Peter Noone says he's on "Wonderful World" and "Silhouettes", among many others) Vic Flick (various sessions c. 1965-66) Joe Moretti (various sessions, 1965-68) John McLaughlin (on "No Milk Today") Graham Gouldman (on "The London Look") Bobby Graham (drums on some sessions, 1964-65) Clem Cattini (drums on later sessions) Regards, Scott -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 21:51:42 -0000 From: Peter Lerner Subject: Re: Freddie & The Dreamers Previously on Spectropop: > This song [Freddie & the Dreamers' "In My Baby's Arms"] is now on > musica, and it is a nice piece of Merseybeat. Merseybeat is presumably a generic term that Americans use for all British 60s music sung by males with northern accents, then. Something like "northern soul". Freddie and the lads were from Manchester, not Liverpool, a short distance by road but millions of miles away culturally and on the River Irwell. Peter the Spectropop pedant -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2002 18:01:01 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Lee Hazlewood / Lou Reed / Gene Pitney Guy Lawrence wrote: > Ace records Lee Hazlewood CD is now out and is a real treat. It > makes the recent "Lounge Legends" album redundant as it includes > everything Lee did for MGM. Also included are three Alpertesque > instrumentals by Lee Hazlewood's Woodchucks, a thrilling photo of > Suzi Jane Hokum and a couple of Spector anecdotes in the excellent > sleevenotes. Can you provide a little more info on this CD, esp. its proper title? Those of us west of the Atlantic are unlikely to find a copy in our stores, and thus will need some specific info with which to locate it online. > Tying up two recent threads, the intro to "Then He Kissed Me" of course > forms the riff to "The Ostrich" by The Primitives. The information on > Lou Reed's pre-Velvets work dug up here recently was top notch, however, > it begs the question - why isn't there a compilation of this stuff > available legally? I'm sure it would be a big seller. Out of interest, > can any of the reissue label people out there outline the work involved > in such a project? Norton has an EP out, entitled "All Tomorrow's Dance Parties," with what appears to be Louie Louie's high school yearbook photo as its PS. The disc is far from comprehensive, but does get several of his pre-VU sides (his entire Time/Shad output, I believe) into one place and in an attractive package. The fact that I've never seen ANY of the Pickwick stuff come out legitimately suggests that either it's tied up legally or that the owners are, for whatever their reasons, playing their hand close to the vest. Ron Sauer wrote (about Gene Pitney's "That Girl Belongs To Yesterday": > and the double track as a bonus track on a different cd. Was the > British single release in the 60's the single track or double track? > And why was it so hard to find the double track? Which version do you think is better? --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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