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Spectropop - Digest Number 669



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                        Jamie LePage (1953-2002)
                  http://www.spectropop.com/Jamie.htm
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There are 22 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Liking Bad Music
           From: Jeff Lemlich 
      2. Re: Dave's 5 Hermits
           From: Mikey 
      3. 8 Mile
           From: Mike Edwards 
      4. Re: Dave's 5 Hermits
           From: Neb Rodgers 
      5. blacklisting
           From: Don Lonie 
      6. Re: Dave Clark to the Max!
           From: James Botticelli 
      7. Re: Dave's 5 Hermits
           From: Ron Weekes 
      8. REALLY bad music
           From: "Neil Hever" 
      9. Re: Dave Clark to the Max!
           From: Mikey 
     10. Re: REALLY bad music
           From: Mikey 
     11. High Noone...?
           From: Bob Rashkow 
     12. Re: Johnny G.
           From: Peter McDonnell 
     13. Re: blacklisting
           From: Steve Harvey 
     14. Re: Dave Clark to the Max!
           From: Steve Harvey 
     15. That's Me, I'm the Brother
           From: sheila 
     16. Distant Drums
           From: Steve Harvey 
     17. Re: REALLY bad music
           From: Javed Jafri 
     18. Re: to the Max!
           From: James Botticelli 
     19. Re: REALLY bad music
           From: Dave 
     20. Re: Johnny G.
           From: Rik 
     21. '60s pop groups doing Coca-Cola ads
           From: zombie7123 
     22. Re: blacklisting
           From: Eddy Smit 


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Message: 1
   Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 13:47:05 -0000
   From: Jeff Lemlich 
Subject: Re: Liking Bad Music

> Jeff Lemlich wrote:
> ...............I'm completely captivated by Donna Lynn's 
> Capitol label stinker "That's Me, I'm The Brother", which 
> has no redeeming qualities outside of being, well, 
> irresistibly bad! And then there's "Into Outer Space With 
> Lucia Pamela"...........

Phil C:
> Any chance of playing your two to musica, Jeff,

Lucia is out on a CD so I probably need to pass on that, but I 
seriously doubt anyone has comped the Donna Lynn track!   It's 
on the flip of her Capitol 45, "Ronnie", and tells the story of 
"Rita, Conchita, Chiquita, Rosita, Marquita, Juanita, Lolita, 
and Joe" - with Joe's voice obviously spliced in (and poorly, too).   
To put it mildly, this record is pointless, and amazingly flawed! 
- yet I keep going back to it!

At least Donna doesn't put on a fake Spanish accent (a la "West 
Side Story"), unlike the woman who does the "Madre Mia" part at 
the beginning.   So let me get this straight - the singer isn't 
Latino and neither is "the brother" Joe, but the 7 sisters with 
the cliched names are!   And if Joe is a little boy, then why do 
Donna's dates have to find a date for HIM?   (All eight siblings 
come along on the "double dates").  

And SO WHAT if she has a little brother - the main point of the 
song is her not being able to "see the moon" without the other 
eight along, not just the fact that one of them isn't named 
"Joe-ita"!

You can hear this train wreck on musica now.   As irrational as 
it might sound, I find this irresistible!

Jeff Lemlich
http://www.limestonerecords.com



-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 10:55:45 -0500 From: Mikey Subject: Re: Dave's 5 Hermits Dave Swanson > So Dave Clark didn't play drums on the records; so what. Blatantly not true!! Dave played drums on every DC5 disk. He may not have played on the Dave Clark and Friends LP, but thats it. this rumor started because Dave produced some records for Christie and Mike D'Abo on which he used Clem Cattini (Tornados) on drums. The Dave Clark Drum sound is unmistakeable!!! And it's on just about every record. Mikey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 15:48:46 -0000 From: Mike Edwards Subject: 8 Mile Those of us with at least a mild interest in the evolution of pop music will be intrigued by the biggest movie in the US right now, "8 Mile" starring the rap star, Eminem. His character ("Rabbit") lives in a trailer park in a pretty run down part of Detroit, works in a sheet metal shop and hangs out with African American buddies. He competes in local hip hop contests and plans to record a demo of his material. The plot basically looks at a week in his life and culminates in the big contest, when it's Rabbit versus three different dudes, against whom he has built up some animosity, in a key contest. The contest involves each participant verbally insulting the other in rhyme with a DJ supplying a backing track. I would have liked more music at this stage. There are also a few romantic interludes. This is well in keeping with the spirit of most Rock `N' Roll films. Didn't "Rock Around The Clock'", "Don't Knock The Twist" and "Saturday Night Fever" have a weak story line culminating in the big "music"/dance finale. Rabbit is Tony Manero, 25 years later: a guy in a dead end job with some talent he believes will take him somewhere. Stephanie from SNF becomes Alex (Brittany Murphy), Rabbit's love interest in "8 Mile". I recommend the film. Just don't try counting how many times the "f" and "s" words are used. Mike Edwards -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 17:27:27 -0000 From: Neb Rodgers Subject: Re: Dave's 5 Hermits Dave Swanson wrote: > So Dave Clark didn't play drums on the records... Huh?... I didn't know that... so who did actually play drums on their records? -Neb -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 12:18:01 -0800 From: Don Lonie Subject: blacklisting From: Dave Swanson Subject: Re: Dave's 5 Hermits >Huh. I am assuming those of you who are blacklisting the DC5 >and The Hermits from your ears have never actually listened to >either group. There is a load of great records between these >two combos. I once saw Celine Dion do a good song on TV. But I still think she's incredibly annoying and if she never made another record, my life would be a tiny bit brighter. Even a broken clock is correct twice a day and I've found good cuts on a lot of records that were otherwise just crap and filler. That's one of the joys of taking a chance on records. And I think it's particularly true of the period of music we talk about here. I've gone through a lot of records in the "soft pop" genre where I wouldn't defend the group's talent but I still can't completely dismiss their records. For some reason the name "The Primo People" comes to mind as an example. Nobody's blacklisting the DC5 or Herman's Hermits, whatever that would entail. And I'm not sure anybody's even saying they were crap. The debate was - originally at least - whether Marianne Faithful had any justification for dismissing Herman's Hermits as a minor group. Or maybe she even said "crap". I didn't read the article. I've heard the good tunes by Herman's Hermits. I've put them on compilations and surprised a number of people when they find out who did the tune. But I still understand the impulse to dismiss them, even if it's based on nothing else but one of the world's most annoying singles ever, namely "Mrs. Brown...." I seem to recall that "No Milk Today" was a B-side. I think we established in a previous discussion that a lot of people never checked out the B-sides. I think it's cool that people here have such extensive knowledge but I don't think it's fair to ask everyone to do thorough research - or even flip the record over - before they express an opinion. Don -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 14:54:16 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Dave Clark to the Max! Steve Harvey wrote: > Don't forget that Max Weinberg thought enough of Dave > Clark to put him in his book on drummers. Max needs the support! Not that he isn't competent, but I certainly wouldn't put it on my resume were I Dave Clark, that I made Max's book. On the other hand if DC had put Max in HIS "book on drummers", Max would have something to smirk about. As of now, his smirk is wasted at this address. Just an opinion, but this forum offers that option. JB/dislikes seeing MW perched high above his own band smirking away on Conan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 13:24:06 -0700 From: Ron Weekes Subject: Re: Dave's 5 Hermits Dave Swanson wrote: > So Dave Clark didn't play drums on the records... Neb then wrote: > Huh?... I didn't know that... so who did actually play > drums on their records? Maybe it was Mickey Dolenz!!! Landlocked in Idaho! Ron -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 21:53:48 -0000 From: "Neil Hever" Subject: REALLY bad music Spectros, With all the talk of bad vs. good music and the tendency for some of us to enjoy sappy or cheesy music, the subject of truly awful pop music has been given little notice. To rectify this oversight, I offer three singles for your consideration. The Churchmice "College Psycology (sp) on Love/Babe We're Not Part Of Society" is truly bad. The brainchild of Rochester NY House of Guitars owner Armand Schaubrdeck is incompetent folk rock in search of a tuned guitar ironically enough! I'm the lucky owner of an autographed copy. Then there is the execrable waxing by The Planets "Moon Crazy/Could You, Would You" on Bingo records. This toxic wax features a tuneless glee club accompanied by a turgid organ with the added touch of some out of place castanets. The topper comes courtesy of Kenn Records in Pittsburgh. A really senior soprano warbles over the nearly competent music of a swing band on ex- lax about being an "Airline Hostess". It features the killer line "I'm gonna be a hostess, the one with the mostess!" Better yet, you can flip it over and sing along Karaoke style if you are in the mood. If you dare to listen to this stuff I'm sure you'll agree it is indeed REALLY bad music. There are brave people who keep this stuff alive around the world but I've never seen these three titles show up. I'd love to hear about more bad stuff. Best wishes, Neil Hever -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 15:17:44 -0500 From: Mikey Subject: Re: Dave Clark to the Max! James Botticelli: JB, I think youre off base here. Max is VERY nice and helpful to young drummers. He's a regular guy, and he COULD be a dick, but he isn't. When he is at home, you're liable to run into him at the hardware store or the dry cleaners, and he always stops to say hi and chat for a bit. He even gave me the name of a drum teacher and told me to use his name. Not a lot of Rock and Roll pros would bother. Your Friend, Mikey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 17:03:14 -0500 From: Mikey Subject: Re: REALLY bad music Well, if your'e talking REALLY bad music, there is a 45 called "The Beatnik" which is a blues jam with two Beatniks smoking pot and getting high. One says "Like, this one's in Orbit, Man" Your Friend, Mikey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 18:08:16 -0500 From: Bob Rashkow Subject: High Noone...? Wasn't "No Milk Today" the B-side of "Kind of Hush (All Over The World)"? Yet when I stack "Kind of Hush" alongside "Mrs. Brown, You've Got A Lovely Daughter" it's the latter I like much better. I do agree with a couple of other 'Poppers that NMT is one heckuva beautiful tune. Fascinating to see what diverse tastes we all have, both in genres and specific groups and tunes! Bobster -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 14:13:03 -0800 From: Peter McDonnell Subject: Re: Johnny G. Rik: > Yes, and he was due to perform at the Roostertail that evening > in front of a specially invited audience at a pre- release > showing of "Standing in the Shadows of Motown" - a film all > about the Funk Brothers. Rik, It's very sad about Mr. Griffith. How terrible that he passed away on the very day of the special showing of the film. How bittersweet could that be? I just saw Standing In The Shadows last night at a local sneak pre. I loved it, and it's great that these guys are finally getting this (belated) recognition. I give this film my highest recommendation. The film wisely concentrates, for the most part, on the Fabulous Funk Brothers, and not so much on the already celebrated performers, songwriters and producers of the Detroit-era Motown...Berry Gordy isn't even in it, except in old photos and film clips. This film is a must-see; there were moments when I had tears in my eyes. Exhilarating. friscopedro -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 16:26:15 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: blacklisting "Even a broken clock is correct twice a day" That would be a great lyric to some garage tune. I can hear Mouse and the Traps singing it now. > I seem to recall that "No Milk Today" was a B-side. That's news to me. It must have eventually become an A-side since it was a hit. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 16:31:50 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Dave Clark to the Max! A friend of mine, Bruce Egbert, once told me a funny story about meeting The Boss down in Richmond back in 1972, just before signing with CBS. Anyway he calls me years later, after watching Conan, to tell me that Max Weinberg was the same guy he grew up with in north Jersey back in the 60s. Max had a group then and use to appear on the local teen TV show. Never realized he was the same guy who drummed for The Boss. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 19:26:24 -0500 From: sheila Subject: That's Me, I'm the Brother I am thrilled that Jeff Lemlich devoted an entire post to Donna Lynn's B-side, "That's Me, I'm the Brother." because I too, find this song irresistible! The sheer silliness of this track is easy to dismiss, but if you remove the juvenile lyrics and Donna's adorable little brother, I'd say this is an excellent girl pop song. I find the melodies are much more interesting than those of the A-side, "Ronnie" (a fairly typical pop song). And I think the "Rita, Conchita, Chiquita..." parts are quite hysterical. Just a slight digression here...... I was asked to DJ a girl group set at this club in London about 6 years ago (when I was residing in London) because the promoter of this techno-pop night wanted to do something a little different. So, I'm playing a set of British and American girl group 45s to a club full of very miserable looking people. But it was when I played "That's Me, I'm the Brother" (to try to liven things up!) that two people came up to me and said- "We are so sorry to have to say this, but the set you are playing is just awful. Look at the crowd - they can't stand this music. Please please can you play some good music, or have another DJ come on. This song is just so stupid." Needless to say, they cut me off after that song. And it was only my 2nd DJ gig ever! So DJs - if you want an early night, be sure to give that record a spin. Sheila -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 16:23:05 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Distant Drums I got to hang out once with Nick Lowe and band. I remember someone in the group talking about Dave playing drums with a real drummer behind the curtain. He only toured England once so maybe that's why. Also heard about a bass stand-in for Jet Harris, also behind a curtain. Mikey: > The Dave Clark Drum sound is unmistakeable!!! > And it's on just about every record. How do you know that the drum sound wasn't a session musician to begin with? He could have been used on all the records like many other pop bands did. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 17:42:47 -0500 From: Javed Jafri Subject: Re: REALLY bad music Neil Hever: > The brainchild of Rochester NY House of Guitars owner Armand > Schaubrdeck is incompetent folk rock in search of a tuned > guitar ironically enough! Hey I remember Armand and the House of Guitars mostly because of their wacky ads on both radio and TV and they endeared themselves to me because their ads ended with the line "we carry all the Beach Boy albums." Javed -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 19:52:38 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: to the Max! Mikey wrote: > JB, I think youre off base here. Max is VERY nice and helpful > to young drummers........ Interesting anecdotal information and a good refutation of my opinion. It just goes to show you how body language can be read. Maybe it's a smile, not a smirk. Maybe he's a nice guy, not a jerk. Maybe its just the position in which he chooses to work. I'll think twice nex' time... JB -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 01:47:29 -0500 From: Dave Subject: Re: REALLY bad music Mikey: >Well, if you're talking REALLY bad music, there is a 45 called >"The Beatnik" which is a blues jam with two Beatniks smoking >pot and getting high. One says "Like, this one's in Orbit, Man" Now, this sounds like something I could really get into! I love retarded novelties. Who did this? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Fri, 14 Nov 1997 01:16:30 -0000 From: Rik Subject: Re: Johnny G. Peter McDonnell: > ....This film is a must-see; there were moments when I had > tears in my eyes. Exhilarating. I haven't had the chance to see the film yet. It shows for the first time in the UK Friday and Saturday this week. It will be on UK general release in Feb/Mar 2003 to coincide with the Funk Brothers touring the UK at that time. I am talking to the UK Distributors about a possible screening prior to its release. Richard Searling (Northern Soul DJ from Jazz FM) and I would like to show it at a cinema followed by top Motown DJs playing in the cinema for the audience to dance to Motown music for the rest of the night. What a great event that would be! Rik Editor Chatbusters The only monthly Motown magazine in the world! http://www.chatbusters.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 04:13:36 -0000 From: zombie7123 Subject: '60s pop groups doing Coca-Cola ads There's been some discussion here about oldies being used in TV and radio commercials -- a seemingly modern curse. But I have evidence that many bands back in the '60s were total sell-outs (at least by modern standards) even back then. A while ago I snagged out of the ether a surprising array of '60s pop groups doing radio ads for Coca-Cola. And, most shocking of all, it wasn't a bunch of corporate hack bands but rather a selection of bands and performers that supposedly had a lot of integrity and credibility: The Left Banke, Mary Hopkin, the Easybeats, and Petula Clark (OK, she's a bit corporate, but the rest aren't). My question is: where did these tracks come from? Were these ads released on a CD some time back (I don't have any CDs or a CD player so I know little to nothing about the world of CDs)? Does anybody know their history? For your edification, I have played three of them to musica (the files are quite small -- all three combined take up less space than one average 2-minute song). Are these ads rarities? Or common knowledge? Any background on them and their origins would be appreciated. Thanks. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 06:58:39 +0100 From: Eddy Smit Subject: Re: blacklisting > I seem to recall that "No Milk Today" was a B-side. No Milk Today was a UK A-side c/w My reservation's been confirmed on Columbia DB 8012 (1966). In 1967 it was issued in the USA as the B-side of There's a kind of hush on MGM 13681. And although they have different track listings, it wound up on the Kind of Hush album on both sides of the Atlantic. Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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