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Spectropop - Digest Number 668



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______________        S  P  E  C  T  R  O  P  O  P        ______________
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                        Jamie LePage (1953-2002)
                  http://www.spectropop.com/Jamie.htm
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There are 21 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Slow Fizz - Post-party!
           From: Elisabeth 
      2. Billy Mitchell
           From: Phil Milstein 
      3. Motown Musician Johnny Griffith Dies at 66
           From: Neb Rodgers 
      4. Johnny Griffith, RIP
           From: James F.  Cassidy 
      5. Then He Kissed Me
           From: Stuffed Animal 
      6. Neil Sedaka demos
           From: Antonio Vizcarra 
      7. Re: Day Tripper, DC5
           From: Peter McDonnell 
      8. RE: Johnny Griffith, RIP
           From: Rik 
      9. Re: Day Tripper, DC5
           From: Doug 
     10. Neil Sedaka Tonight On Biography
           From: Alan Gordon 
     11. art?   my 2 cents...  how much is that in pence these days?
           From: Alan Gordon 
     12. Re: Day Tripper, DC5
           From: Richard Tearle 
     13. Re: Day Tripper, DC5
           From: Phil Milstein 
     14. Re: Day Tripper, DC5
           From: Steve Harvey 
     15. Re: art?   my 2 cents...  how much is that in pence these days?
           From: Phil Milstein 
     16. Re: Day Tripper, DC5
           From: Billy G Spradlin 
     17. Re: Singing Bodies
           From: Bill George 
     18. Monkees demos
           From: Phil Milstein 
     19. Dave Clark to the Max!
           From: Steve Harvey 
     20. Re: Dave's 5 Hermits
           From: Dave Swanson 
     21. new issue of "JACKIE"
           From: Bill George 


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Message: 1
   Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 16:42:05 -0000
   From: Elisabeth 
Subject: Slow Fizz - Post-party!

Just wanted to post a big public thank you to everyone who 
helped to make Slow Fizz a fantastic event.

Despite a stressful start due to extremely unlucky technical 
problems, the genius of Phil saved the day and the party went 
on to be a great night. Thank you to everyone who bought me 
drinks to help me calm down!

Mick, Ian and Simon shared the decks with Declan Meehan 
(Spectropop lurker I think!), Declan Allen and Tag. With 6 
fabulous record collections like that on the go, I don't 
think I stopped smiling and rushing off to the dance floor. 
My vintage heels certainly took a battering that night!

Manning the door meant that I made sure I met just about 
everyone who turned up (hello to Spectropoppers Ken & Janet 
from Blackpool!), but it was especially wonderful when Carole 
& her friend Michael arrived and kept me company - we got to 
meet at long last and have a good old pop gossip.

Listings in City Life and the Guardian TV guide, oodles of 
posters and flyers distributed throughout Manchester and Leeds 
and plugs on suitable mailing lists meant we drew quite a good 
crowd, with the venue humming away by the time I went on to do 
my PA. 

Thanks (again!) to Phil for also sorting out the backing tracks 
and getting the equipment working - for those interested, the 
songs were:

Felice Taylor - I Feel Love Coming On
Jackie Trent - Take Me Away
Breakways - That's How It Goes
Ronettes - Be My Baby
Felice Taylor - It May Be Winter Outside
Lisa (Mychols) - Lost Winter's Dream

The dance floor was rarely empty after that point, and I even 
got to see Phil & Ian cut some rug.

Special extra thanks:

- Mick, for the sheet music scans - everyone raved about how 
nice they made the room look.

- Carole, for videoing the night and bringing along *that* 
Dusty miniskirt... 

- Lisa M, who kindly sent me the correct lyrics so I could do 
Lost Winter's Dream justice.

- Martin Roberts, who sent me good luck flowers since he & Sue 
couldn't make it (such a lovely surprise!)

- Delia, for getting Slow Fizz into the listings.

- All my DJs!

Hope I haven't forgotten anyone or anything.

We'll be doing it again, but at a different venue - possibly 
around Valentine's day. Watch this space!

elisabeth x



-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 01:42:57 -0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Billy Mitchell This came to me from a friend in Melbourne; not sure what paper it originated in. --Phil M. ------------------ Billy Mitchell, 71, a former singer with the Washington-based rhythm-and-blues group the Clovers who was best known for his rollicking rendition of "Love Potion No. 9," died Nov. 5 at Washington Hospital Center after strokes. He had colon cancer. ------------------ [ The full story can be found in the articles area http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/articles ] -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Mon, 11 Nov 2002 16:39:11 -0800 (PST) From: Neb Rodgers Subject: Motown Musician Johnny Griffith Dies at 66 We lost another great one over the weekend. -Neb ----------------------- Motown Musician Johnny Griffith Dies at 66 Sun Nov 10, 07 :11 PM ET DETROIT (Reuters) - Johnny Griffith, a classically trained musician who played keyboards on many Motown hits of the 1960s, died on Sunday at age 66, his publicist said. The cause of death was not immediately disclosed. ------------------------ [ The full story can be found in the articles area http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/articles ] -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 12:10:52 -0500 From: James F. Cassidy Subject: Johnny Griffith, RIP Johnny Griffith, 66; helped provide the rhythm to Motown By Los Angeles Times, 11/12/2002 LOS ANGELES - Johnny Griffith, a keyboard player with the Funk Brothers, the highly skilled group of Detroit studio musicians who helped create and define the legendary Motown sound, died of a heart attack Sunday at a Detroit hospital. He was 66. - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - [ The full story can be found in the articles area http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/articles ] -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 17:36:32 +0000 From: Stuffed Animal Subject: Then He Kissed Me Does anyone like the Sonny Bono arrangement of "Then He Kissed Me" that he cut with Cher for their first album? I think it's absolutely enchanting! Nobody can top La La Brooks singing this number, but I actually prefer Sonny's arrangement to Jack Nitzsche's. It just sounds more . . . romantic. Stuffed Animal -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 20:30:29 +0100 From: Antonio Vizcarra Subject: Neil Sedaka demos Hi everybody I have just bought the Neil Sedaka double cd from Brilltone which includes some of his demos and I have to say its excellent!!! Fantastic versions of "My Best Friend Barbara", "We Had A Good Thing Going"(later released by the Cyrkle) and especially two takes of the Monkees' song "The Girl I Left Behind Me". There are also some songs I had never heard which are also really good. Does anybody know if there are other demos of songs given later to the Monkees on cd on the market? I would love to listen to them :-) All the best, Antonio -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 12:51:33 -0800 From: Peter McDonnell Subject: Re: Day Tripper, DC5 > Daytripper was about a prostitute. > One of three hooker tunes the Fabs did. If it's been established that "Day Tripper" is really not about a prostitute, then I'd be curious about which were the other two Fab tunes written about that subject...are you counting "Maggie Mae" from Let It Be? Alan Gordon: > I must be in the minority here. But I have always really dug > the DC5. I may be of Russian/Jewish background, but I always > really liked that gestapo beat they had going on stuff like: > "Bits and Pieces" and "Any Way You Want It". I also thought > that "Because" was a great romantic slow dance song, still do > ... great organ. Regarding the influence of the DC5 on other rockers, I recall reading a bit about Bruce Springsteen asking Dave Clark about how he got that revved-up, stomping groove that they used in "Any Way You Want It"...and then doing his version of it for his epic rocker "Born To Run"...anybody else ever hear that one? friscopedro -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Wed, 12 Nov 1997 20:20:37 -0000 From: Rik Subject: RE: Johnny Griffith, RIP > LOS ANGELES - Johnny Griffith, a keyboard player with the Funk > Brothers, the highly skilled group of Detroit studio musicians who > helped create and define the legendary Motown sound, died of a heart > attack Sunday at a Detroit hospital. He was 66. Yes, and he was due to perform at the Roostertail that evening in front of a specially invited audience at a pre- release showing of "Standing in the Shadows of Motown" - a film all about the Funk Brothers. Rik Editor - Chatbusters The only monthly Motown magazine in the world! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 22:02:13 -0000 From: Doug Subject: Re: Day Tripper, DC5 Peter McDonnell wrote: > Regarding the influence of the DC5 on other rockers, I recall > reading a bit about Bruce Springsteen asking Dave Clark about > how he got that revved-up, stomping groove that they used in > "Any Way You Want It"...and then doing his version of it for > his epic rocker "Born To Run"...anybody else ever hear that one? Well, it's really not that far from Gary "U.S." Bonds (whom Springsteen championed) to the DC5, is it? Doug -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 14:26:44 -0800 From: Alan Gordon Subject: Neil Sedaka Tonight On Biography just a reminder : A & E Biography tonight!!! Neil Sedaka -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 15:31:00 -0800 From: Alan Gordon Subject: art? my 2 cents... how much is that in pence these days? TO: Phil Milstein Re: Music and emotion Sorry I'm so late commenting on this. First I have to say: Holy friggin' Moley! What a fantastic commentary, Phil. I have pages upon pages of my own, mostly tangential, meanderings on this subject. I almost always think of "Chris In The Morning" from Northern Exposure being the writers vehicle to explore thoughts like these... great stuff. > Book-length writing is, in a sense, the most stupid medium, > being the only one that requires more than one sitting to > complete. I agree "almost" wholeheartedly (would that then be "holeheartedly?), with most of your commentary, but I would never refer to Book-length writing as stupid. What does "stupid" have to do with immersing oneself in the lengthy emotional dissertations of Rilke, Shakespear, Joyce, Stan Lee, et al? What does one's attention span have to do with something being "stupid"? That seems obtuse reasoning to me... no offense. Maybe I just misinterpreted. > Dance requires nothing but one human body to achieve its > effects, but how often do the remnant images of a dance once > seen creep into the mind and take hold?" With me? A lot. I get quite lost seeing the movements (and Music) to Giselle in my mind... I'm sure I'm in the minority here. And music is the same as dance to me, as it requires just one instrument. > The bidding would often get down as low as three or > four notes, and I once saw a lady recognize Java in just > one note!" Actually that's impossible. All notes are relative, to most of us humans without perfect pitch. No specific note is any different than another note except in it's relationship to another. But of course I'm sure you are actually speaking of situations regarding more than one note. If someone is playing a recording of a popular tune by a specific performer, even if it's only one note of the melody, it "plays" other notes of the arrangement, even if these "notes" are percussion and room ambience. IMHO I generally define art as something that enlists the "observer" in a metaphor. A metaphor being an image or idea that has no word... which is by definition "ineffable." This includes writing, because it's a string of words that creates the metaphor. My own idea about music and it's power over the human soul, is that it is in no small way, a bookmark in our lives. It makes the complicated nature of our being just a little less complicated for a moment. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 22:34:11 -0000 From: Richard Tearle Subject: Re: Day Tripper, DC5 Peter McDonnell: > If it's been established that "Day Tripper" is really not about > a prostitute, then I'd be curious about which were the other two > Fab tunes written about that subject... The only song of which I know for certain was about a prostitute is Norwegian Wood which John wrote after a 'visit' and was terrified that Cynthia would find out. As for the other one (or two) it's anybody's guess.... Cheers Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 17:10:35 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Day Tripper, DC5 > Regarding the influence of the DC5 on other rockers, I recall > reading a bit about Bruce Springsteen asking Dave Clark about > how he got that revved-up, stomping groove that they used in > "Any Way You Want It"...and then doing his version of it for > his epic rocker "Born To Run"...anybody else ever hear that one? I read somewhere that the DC5 were a big influence on the MC5. Could that be possible? --Phil M. (sorry Peter, I'm just havin fun not makin fun) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 16:13:02 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Day Tripper, DC5 I thought that Norwegian Wood was about John trying to pull Bridget Bardot. I'm not convinced about Daytripper not being about a hooker, but to each his own. The other two tunes are Lady Madonna (wonders how she'll pay the rent) and Maggie May (which was an old 'pool ditty they probably heard growing up). -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 23:11:54 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: art? my 2 cents... how much is that in pence these days? Alan Gordon wrote: > First I have to say: Holy friggin' Moley! Thank you for your response to my comments. > I have pages upon pages > of my own, mostly tangential, meanderings on this subject. Which was pretty much what I went into this "dissertation" with. At the risk of straining the attentions of S'poppers, I posted it in part to help me sort out various strands of disparate and inconclusive thoughts on the matter. > I agree "almost" wholeheartedly (would that then be "holeheartedly?), > with most of your commentary, but I would never refer to Book-length > writing as stupid. What does "stupid" have to do with immersing > oneself in the lengthy emotional dissertations of Rilke, Shakespear, > Joyce, Stan Lee, et al? I meant it purely as a provocative point in the context of the (obviously absurd) comparison to other art forms. Books of course have charms for which the other forms can but yearn, but the more-than-one-sitting factor has always struck me as something of an oddity -- which, by my accounting, is far from an undesirable description -- among the arts. > Actually that's impossible. All notes are relative, to most of > us humans without perfect pitch. No specific note is any different > than another note except in it's relationship to another. Call it a lucky guess, then? Aw, you caught me in a moment of self-amusing hyperbole. But I definitely do recall a small handful of very impressive stabs at naming that tune in two notes. Given the success of several gameshow revivals in recent years, I propose that it is high time for the return of Name That Tune! > My own idea about music and it's power over the human soul, is that > it is in no small way, a bookmark in our lives. It makes the > complicated nature of our being just a little less complicated > for a moment. But in what way does that make it unique among the arts? --Phil Milstein (You're welcome to continue this thread off-list, Alan, if you feel we're in danger of losing the group's patience on it.) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 05:07:48 -0000 From: Billy G Spradlin Subject: Re: Day Tripper, DC5 Phil Milstein: > Regarding the influence of the DC5 on other rockers, I recall > reading a bit about Bruce Springsteen asking Dave Clark about > how he got that revved-up, stomping groove that they used in > "Any Way You Want It"...and then doing his version of it for > his epic rocker "Born To Run"...anybody else ever hear that one Ken Barnes mentioned this meeting in the liner notes to Hollywood's "History of the Dave Clark 5" compilation - no mention of when it happened. He also mentions the band's influence on Max Wienberg, and (gasp!) Alex and Eddie Van Halen. BTW anyone who thinks the DC5 made lousy records should check out this 2-CD compilation (if they can find it, Collectors Choice music may still have a few copies left on their website). Also check out the movie "Having a Wild Weekend", which was the first film directed by John Boorman and much better than most of the teenage movies featuring rock groups of that era. Billy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 00:49:25 EST From: Bill George Subject: Re: Singing Bodies Phil C : > OK Bill, sing along AYOR. [Singing Bodies - "What Am I > Gonna Do With You (Hey Baby)]. Not for the faint-hearted. Yikes! I don't think they could hear the track very well.... thanks for playing. It's actually quite a lot of fun :) -Bill -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 23:34:12 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Monkees demos To whomever was asking for Monkees demos, although it wasn't technically a demo I could play (to musica) The Gamma Goochee's version of I'm Gonna Buy Me A Dog. As noted here recently, this version preexisted The Monkees', and may even have used the same tracks. While revisiting The Gamma Goochee, I note that one of John Mangiagli's pre-G.G. incarnations was as Johnny Donn who, with The Jazzrockers, released a 45 of Smog b/w What Happened Last Night (Crest 1058). --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 16:16:38 -0800 (PST) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Dave Clark to the Max! Don't forget that Max Weinberg thought enough of Dave Clark to put him in his book on drummers. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2002 19:39:21 -0500 From: Dave Swanson Subject: Re: Dave's 5 Hermits Huh. I am assuming those of you who are blacklisting the DC5 and The Hermits from your ears have never actually listened to either group. There is a load of great records between these two combos. So Dave Clark didn't play drums on the records; So they were hated by Graham Nash (according the that Vanity Fair article); So what. I'll take "Glad All Over" over "Marakesh Express" any day of the week. The DC5 made some of thee most killer 45s of the era hands down! You find a more sonic assault than "Anyway You Want It"! That record alone is enough to love 'em. "Try Too Hard", "Doctor Rhythm", "Glad All Over", "Catch Us If You Can", "Havin A Wild Weekend"! Not to mention more obscure ones like "Maze Of Love", "All Night Long" or "Inside And Out". All solid killers! I'll stack those up against not only the British Invasion bands records but those are some of the best 45s of the 1960s! The sonic quality of an old Epic 45 is something to behold! As for The Hermits, give another listen to "No Milk Today", "Hold On", "Take Love Give Love" or the obscure killer "My Reservation's Been Confirmed" and then tell me they were all crap! Sure The Hermits had a lot of twee and beyond wimpy nonsense, but there are some great records between the sap. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2002 00:49:22 EST From: Bill George Subject: new issue of "JACKIE" Just a heads-up that the latest issue of "Jackie" is finished and online for your viewing pleasure at the Jackie DeShannon Appreciation Society's website, found at http://jackiedeshannon.tripod.com Enjoy! -Bill (and can someone please repost the URL to see the Spectropop party pix? I couldn't find it in the photos section. Thanks.) Admin: [ http://www.spectropop.com/party ] -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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