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Spectropop - Digest Number 655



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______________        S  P  E  C  T  R  O  P  O  P        ______________
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                        Jamie LePage (1953-2002)
                  http://www.spectropop.com/Jamie.htm
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There are 21 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. The Ronettes - money is the root...
           From: Warren Cosford 
      2. Original music, bad music, other music
           From: Country Paul 
      3. Emotional records and more
           From: Country Paul 
      4. Bowser and Blue
           From: Charles G. Hill 
      5. Re: Cutie Pop and beyond... Suggestions?
           From: sheila 
      6. Alternate pop universe
           From: Antonio Vizcarra 
      7. Re: Alternate pop universe / Monkees
           From: Allen Roberds 
      8. Re: The Aussie V.U. etc.
           From: Phil Milstein 
      9. Re: Original versions etc
           From: Ken Silverwood 
     10. Re:  Velvet Underground . . . No, not that one!
           From: Norman 
     11. The 45 Club Sat Nov 9th Killer Who Givaway!
           From: Leonardo Flores 
     12. Nitz Bitz
           From: Martin Roberts 
     13. Re:  Velvet Underground . . . No, not that one!
           From: Phil Milstein 
     14. Re: Joyce Webb/Dean Christopher/Jeff Barry
           From: Davie Gordon 
     15. Re: Alternate pop universe / Monkees
           From: Antonio Vizcarra 
     16. Re: Vari-CD players
           From: Lee 
     17. Come Away Melinda/Cats Eyes
           From: Richard Hattersley 
     18. Davy Jones
           From: Lynn 
     19. All American Show
           From: Ian Chapman 
     20. Re: Liking Bad Music
           From: Simon White 
     21. Davy Jones speeded-up
           From: Ian Chapman 


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Message: 1
   Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 08:28:05 -0500
   From: Warren Cosford 
Subject: The Ronettes - money is the root...

Warren:
> Update: Ronettes lose to Spector. Spector paid out a onetime lump 
> payment of $14,482 to the group when they signed the contract. As 
> it stands now, the Ronettes probably won't get too much more...

Ronald McIntyre:
> I have never understood the mentality and morality of a person who 
> can make millions and millions of dollars off backs of others and 
> pay them nothing. It boggles my mind. Unlike Ronnie Spector, there 
> are other artists who are homeless, living in shelters and 
> destitute. How a person can live with themselves surrounded by 
> opulence knowing a performer who they may not feel contractually 
> obligated to but have to recognize played a part in their wealth is 
> suffering in poverty is really beyond me.

Ron,
I've known a few "rags to riches" people in my career both in media 
and in music.  People I worked with at a time where all of us had very 
little. Some I was able to help reach "the next rung in the ladder".  
A couple became spectacularly successful and wealthy. It was then they 
disappointed me with their behavior, not just to me, but to virtually 
all of the people they had once been friendly with.

Unfortunately, from my experience....too much money allows you to be 
who you really are.

Warren Cosford
Radiopro (TM)



-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 08:32:30 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Original music, bad music, other music Phil Chapman's input into the Herman's Hermits discussion mentions "the more subtle Earl Jean Goffin-King recording of I'm Into Something Good." Agreed - as Jan & Dean sang, "the original's still the greatest." It's not just HH -in my opinion, compare the Stones to Irma Thomas on "Time Is On My Side"; it's all Irma. But when the Stones started doing their own material - and when HH did THEIR own, like my fave "My Reservation's Been Confirmed" or even froth like "She's A Must To Avoid" (known in our radio station as "She's A Muscular Boy") - they really found their way to their own sound and style. I also agree, Phil, that "there is 'bad' music, *and* you can still like it, rather like fast food is quite fun." The recent menton of Rosie & The Originals proves the point - "Angel Baby" starts with the guitar making a whopper of an error in the first few seconds, the vocal fails to come in on time (or is the band 4 bars early?), the sax solo has all the technique of the third chair in an elementary school orchestra, and the entire rhythm section falls apart during the instrumental break. But for three minutes, this ragtag ensemble of ambitious kids produced a garage masterpiece. It's bad as hell, but it's great. Then again, opinions are like noses - everyone's got one. That's mine. (And another one of mine is that on the flip side, the notorious "Give Me Love," the band is playing directly to their expectation!) I second bookmarking http://www.recordmaster.com. They are also very welcoming of new information - perhaps someone should forward the Reflections' discography. Martin Roberts: based on your review of the Rhino Handmade album at http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/index.htm I've ordered it. Thank you again for the superb website. Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 09:41:56 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Emotional records and more Phil M. on Australia: "In the late '60s they too had a Velvet Underground, a band which has since claimed (and no one's disputing it) that they were unaware of the existence of the U.S. band of the same name. How they came up with their's, however, I don't know." I forget the literary reference, but the term came from it. Application to band nomenclature must have been coincidental. Re: emotions in music - wow, who knows with certainty? It's such a subjective thing; what moves one person leaves another cold. I like and second Richard Tearle's comments, and special mention to Phil M.'s and Kingsley's scholarly treatises. Subjectively, strange things move me. The Spectors Three's "I Really Do" gives me a warm velvet feeling that I want to bathe in and let immerse me. I remember first hearing "Tell Laura I Love Her' by Ray Peterson and feeling the immense loss (okay, I was very young, but still....). "Somewhere" from the original Broadway (NOT movie) cast album of "West Side Story" still reduces me to Jello - even at this moment, just thinking about it as I writethis. More recently I was led to "Fluffy" by Gloria Balsam (from the early 80's), a consciously satirical/cynical fake girl group sound (for the few of you who may not know it) that leaves me both crying and laughing hysterically every time. The underlying composition is beautiful, the "singing" consciously horrendous, the arranging over the top. I felt this way about the record even before a fateful day - my birthday five years ago, on which my mother passed away after a long decline - and the song came on WFMU as I was going to claim her body and make funeral arrangements. I just let the combination of emotions out and felt much better afterward - but I ration my playing of this "masterpiece from an alternate universe" very carefully these days. (Note: while "Fluffy" is most frequently found on an out-of-print Rhino album, the original 45 was on Richmond, the same label as Little Roger & The Goosebumps' notorious "Stairway to Gilligan" and "Kennedy Girls.") Related to the above, Don Lonie writes: "I wonder if Johnny Cash could havegotten away with a lyric like 'the honesty's too much.' If he'd somehow slipped that line into the song 'I still miss someone,' could he have made it work?" Don, Johnny Cash could sing the phone book and it would work. Listen to the incredibly powerful "Happy To Be With You" or the brilliantly compact "Come In Stranger." And doggone if he isn't still doing it! As Phil M. noted, The Shaggs are definitely the sine qua non of outsider music, but beneath the surface there is a core of unparalleled inspiration. Should it be too difficult to access from their own work, there's a fine cover of the title song of their album, "Philosophy of the World," by Bruce Lash. You can find it at http://www.cdbaby.com - the sound is even somewhat Spectropop although it was recorded in the 90s. Neb Rodgers points to this Washington Post article: "In the Digital Age, The Quaint Cassette Is Sent Reeling Into History's Dustbin" - http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A32476-2002Oct28.html How depressing! First vinyl, then cassettes, next CD's? My records and tapes sound just fine, thank you, although I've got some gems on reel-to-reel that are prisoners of their now-archaic format.... Speaking of vinyl, some really clean vinyl was selling at the WFMU Record Fair in NYC this weekend for both absurdly high and absurdly low prices. Finally, to Dan Hughes, "Lucy JORDAN," indeed. Mea culpa. I stand corrected. Still a great song. Never heard the Dr. Hook version, but with that lead voice it must be quite moving, too. They're another seriously under-rated band. Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 09:51:09 -0600 From: Charles G. Hill Subject: Bowser and Blue Xavier writes: > Does anyone remember the group Bowser and Blue who did > "Polka Dot Undies"? Legend has it that it was actually > Bob Dylan doing a Bob Dylan parody... Dr Demento reports that it's really a duo: George Bowser and Ricky Blue. They're based in Montreal, and as of 2000 had done nine albums....cgh ============================================================= Charles G. Hill | http://www.dustbury.com A lack of leadership is no substitute for inaction. ============================================================= -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 11:38:59 -0500 From: sheila Subject: Re: Cutie Pop and beyond... Suggestions? Hi Kent: Regarding Japanese girl pop from the sixties, you'll be surprised to hear that Phil Spector, French ye-ye, the Shangri Las, etc, did not have a big influence on the Japanese pop sound. Most of the female artists from that era cite Connie Francis, Brenda Lee, and Doris Day as their main influences. The Phil Spector/girl groups sound didn't really catch on in Japan until the mid 70s. Here's a snippet from an article I wrote on Japanese sixties pop from "Cha Cha Charming": "I was almost certain that Phil Spector, Serge Gainsbourg, and Bob Crewe's production and songwriting methods had influenced the Japanese sixties scene. I imagined Chiyo Okumura singing the Japanese version of "Poupee de Cire, Poupee de Son." And the Peanuts shouting together over a Japanese styled "wall of sound." So when I finally arrived in Japan and purchased two compilations called "60s Japanese Cutie Pop Collection" my high expectations were completely shattered. The music sounded completely foreign to me; the vocals were deep and sophisticated, some twinged with enka (traditional Japanese music). Not at all girly like I had expected. It was only months later that I began to appreciate the sound. The bizarre combination of Western influenced pop with Oriental melodies and vocal styles makes for a truly unique listening experience- one that I came to appreciate with time." It's been two years since I wrote those words, and I have since become a huge fan and collector of Japanese girl pop. Unfortunately most of the Cutie Pop Collections have been deleted, and the 2 girl pop compilations recently released by Chronicle Records in Japan... well, I don't think they are an accurate representation of the sound. David Ponak suggested a compilation called "Good Night Tokyo" (Readymade Records) which is definitely worth checking out. Especially for the Mieko Hirota track "A Lonely Summer" (possibly one of the best girl pop records of that era). To order, visit http://www.deodeo.com/e_index.html and search for the following catalogue #: COCP50216 I recently compiled two CDs worth of my favorite Japanese girl pop tracks. If you're interested, please email me privately. I'm afraid there is very little information in English on this genre. I would be happy to email you the article I wrote, which contains info on producer Sazanami Kenji, the groups sounds, and artists like Akiko Nakamura, Rumi Koyama, Mieko Hirota, and a few others. I'm in the midst of doing more extensive research on the artists and producers- which will be up on the "Cha Cha Charming" website in a few months. I will keep you posted. I hope that helps! Sheila -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Wed, 04 Dec 2002 18:28:40 +0100 From: Antonio Vizcarra Subject: Alternate pop universe Hi there As well as an aussie Velvet Underground band in the sixties, there was another band called the Monkees from Colombia. They released an album in the sixties which would have made you believe you were buying the real thing. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 10:12:56 -0800 (PST) From: Allen Roberds Subject: Re: Alternate pop universe / Monkees Antonio Vizcarra wrote: > Hi there, As well as an aussie Velvet Underground band in the > sixties, there was another band called the Monkees from Colombia. > They released an album in the sixties which would have made > you believe you were buying the real thing. Murray McCleod and I wrote Davy Jones first single, "What are We Going To Do" and "This Bouquet" released by Columbia, before he was a Monkee. Regards, Smokey Roberds -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 13:35:08 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: The Aussie V.U. etc. Country Paul: > I forget the literary reference, but the term came from it. > Application to band nomenclature must have been coincidental. "The Velvet Underground" was the title of an exploitation paperback, purporting to be a sociological survey (but in fact softcore porno) of wife-swapping in the U.S. suburbs. The book was so obscure that the band only knew of it from a copy discovered, by one of the Factory habitues (can't remember which one), in one of New York's legendarily filthy street gutters. Thus my underlying question was How did news of this "underground" title make its way, independent of the U.S. band's name, all the way to Australia? I'm not doubting that it somehow did find its way, but rather marveling at the circuitous route it must have taken. The playing out of unlikely connections is, for me, a big part of the fun of cool music. > someone,' could he have made it work?" Don, Johnny Cash could > sing the phone book and it would work. True enough, but as a songwriter he'd never have stooped anywhere near the level of Sometimes When We Touch. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 20:27:32 -0000 From: Ken Silverwood Subject: Re: Original versions etc Country Paul: > ...and when (Herman's Hermits) did THEIR own, like my fave "My > Reservation's Been Confirmed" or even froth like "She's A Must To > Avoid" (known in our radio station as "She's A Muscular Boy") - > they really found their way to their own sound and style. Beggin' one's pardon, but wasn't it Dobie Gray who mouthed "the original's still the greatest" in " The In Crowd"? And didn't P F Sloan compose " A Must To Avoid" along with Steve Barri, good to hear the songs title was sung" the other way " by other people. P F was on top of his game around that timewith the above plus " Take Me For What I'm Worth " & his own release " Sins Of The Family." I loved all that "social comment/pop" around at that time by Barry McGuire et al. So who did the original version of "Come away Melinda"? I've got a version by Barry StJohn & is there one by Tom Rush? The Beverley Jones " Why Do Lovers" is on HMV 1140 but does not indicate a producer only orchestra by Harry Robinson. All this talk of HH & DC5 has had me scouring through my Columbia section to see if I missed anything all those years ago! Best regards, Ken On The West Coast -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Mon, 04 Nov 2002 07:05:27 +1030 From: Norman Subject: Re: Velvet Underground . . . No, not that one! Hi, Javed Jafri and Phil Milstein both had a gecko at this one. Malcolm Young had been a member of the (Australian) Velvet Underground from about 1971 onwards (I think they disbanded about 1972). From the same stable as AC/DC, in the beginning, were the Ted Mulry Gang. They were more good time rock but great non-the-less. Both Les Hall and Herm Kovak, long time members of the TMG, were also earlier members of Velvet Underground. I can't believe that the group were not aware of the "real" Velvet Underground in 1967. Norman -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 20:56:03 -0000 From: Leonardo Flores Subject: The 45 Club Sat Nov 9th Killer Who Givaway! Hello soul Fans & Dancers, November means Thanksgiving, and it also means The 45 Club is going to have it's next Soulful night on Saturday November 9th at the Knitting Factory. Special guest DJ will be DJ Victoria all the way from Las Vegas. She's been a DJ in The Las Vegas Northern Soul scene for years now and currently has her own Soul night that she promotes and DJs in Vegas. She has many unique floor filler and dancer 45s. We are all looking forward to hearing her set. The Who My Generation deluxe reissue Givaway! Thanksgiving also means thanks to all of you who have supported our club. This month's givaway from Universal music is a legendary one. We will be giving away copies of the new deluxe two-cd reissue of the Who's My Generation CD. Yes you heard right! Perhaps the most sought after reissue of the year for 60s music fans, the beautiful packaging alone is worth the price, but the music...Oh it sounds sooooo good. You haven't really heard My Generation, The Kids Are Allright, etc. until you heard these remastered versions from the original studio session tapes. The bonus disc features unissued songs that was suppose to be on an earlier unreleased Who LP. Universal Music has set a new standard that all reissues labels should emulate. Just ask the DJ for your copy of the Who's Deluxe My Generation CD and remember we have limited copies of this CD, so it's best to show up early. We're looking forward to meeting up with all of you this month for another night filled with our favorite kind of Soul music. Please visit our website http://www.the45club.com for more information. The 45 Club November 9th @ The Knitting Factory 7021 Hollywood Bld. Hollywood info line 323 463 0204 $6, $5 parking Special Guest DJ: DJ Victoria DJ Aston Martini DJ Soul Bags Justin DJ Uplandmod Spinning the best in Northern Soul, Girl Group and Motown till 2.00 am. Cheers, Leonardo Flores -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 21:11:45 -0000 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Nitz Bitz Country Paul: > Martin Roberts: based on your review of the Rhino Handmade > album at http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/index.htm > I've ordered it. Thanks C.P. I'm sure you'll be impressed by it. I hope after reading Ian Chapman's review of 'The Paris Sisters Sing Everything Under The Sun' you have a copy. A great album and review, such a shame it cannot be bought so easily! Martin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 16:50:08 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Velvet Underground . . . No, not that one! Norman wrote: > I can't believe that the group were not aware of the > "real" Velvet Underground in 1967. When did the Aus. group start? And, is "having a gecko" a good thing or bad? --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 21:55:51 -0000 From: Davie Gordon Subject: Re: Joyce Webb/Dean Christopher/Jeff Barry Stuffed Animal wrote: > Joyce Webb also released a great Jeff Barry/Ellie Greenwich > two-sider on ABC Records' Probe subsidiary: "I Don't Want > Nobody If I Can't Have You" b/w "I Believe In Love." Thanks DC, If anybody's interested I'll post my Joyce Webb info when I've done a bit more work on it Davie Gordon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 22:11:24 -0000 From: Antonio Vizcarra Subject: Re: Alternate pop universe / Monkees Allen (Smokey) Roberds wrote: > Murray McCleod and I wrote Davy Jones first single, "What > Are We Going To Do" and "This Bouquet" released by Columbia, > before he was a Monkee. Hi Allen Nice to have you here, I hope you can share some Monkee memories with the rest of the group :-) I have always loved "This Bouquet", a pretty nice song. Although I think Davy Jones' voice on that recording was artificially speeded. All the best. Antonio. --- In spectropop@y..., Allen Roberds wrote: > Antonio Vizcarra wrote: > > Hi there, As well as an aussie Velvet Underground band in the > > sixties, there was another band called the Monkees from Colombia. > > They released an album in the sixties which would have made > > you believe you were buying the real thing. > > Murray McCleod and I wrote Davy Jones first single, "What are We Going > To Do" and "This Bouquet" released by Columbia, before he was a Monkee. > > Regards, > > Smokey Roberds -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 18:07:39 -0500 From: Lee Subject: Re: Vari-CD players Keith asked: > CD players that would adjust the speed of a CD > without changing the pitch etc.... A testimonial -- I just purchased DART XP PRO, the latest version of the DART (Digital Audio Restoration Technology) software package http://www.dartpro.com It contains built-in filters for vari-pitch adjustment without speed change, vari-speed adjustment without pitch change, and "RPM" adjustment (varies pitch and speed simultaneously). It also contains filters for De-Click (removes scratches and pops), De-Hiss (removes tape hiss), De-Hum (removes electrical hum), De-Noise (removes broadband noise), and De-Vocalize (removes vocals from stereo recordings where the lead vocal is mixed to the center). I've tried several packages (including Easy CD Creator) for digitally transferring and de-clicking the 45s and acetates in my collection, and in my opinion DART has by far the best de-click algorithm this side of a $1,000+ NoNoise or CEDAR studio system. The price is $199 off-the-shelf, or $99 if upgrading from a previous DART product, but I think it's worth every penny. The only downside is that the documentation is a little sparse, so you have to figure out the best settings for all of the filters yourself. It's definitely for the intermediate to advanced PC user. Lee -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 23:11:38 +0000 From: Richard Hattersley Subject: Come Away Melinda/Cats Eyes Nice to hear someone mention this track. A fab song. I have a copy by a group called Cats Eyes on the MCA label (1970). A really good version. Anyone know more about this band? Or even better, where I can get a replacement copy as mine is in a bad way! Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Sun, 03 Nov 2002 18:48:26 EST From: Lynn Subject: Davy Jones Speaking of Davy Jones before he was a Monkee, I have a copy of "Dream Girl"/"Take Me To Paradise". Were these done at the same time as "What Are We Going to Do?"? Lynn -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Mon, 04 Nov 2002 00:44:42 -0000 From: Ian Chapman Subject: All American Show Last week I caught the All American Solid Gold Rock & Roll tour that's currently doing an exhaustive string of one-nighters across the UK. As in 1998, the line-up comprises Bobby Vee, Brian Hyland, Chris Montez, and Johnny Preston but this time, instead of Little Eva as the special guest star, we have the Chiffons actually Judy (Craig) Mann and another young lady named Ginger Commodore. On the show I saw, Johnny Preston was replaced by the Big Bopper Jnr., the son (and remarkable lookalike and soundalike) of J.P. Richardson, born just a few months after the air crash which claimed his dad. It's an unpretentious, good-time show, with each act performing at least four or five songs each and there's plenty to interest Spectropoppers. As long as you don't go expecting faithful recreations of the sounds or productions of the original recordings, you shouldn't be disappointed. Backing each of the artists are the Vees, a tight four-piece which includes Bobby's two sons Jeff (drums) and Tommy (bass), nephew Matt (guitar), plus Jeff Olson on keyboards. Chris Montez (looking remarkably like Herb Alpert these days!) included "Some Kinda Fun", "Let's Dance" and performed "The More I See You", acknowledging its high chart placing in the UK. His voice is as good as ever, as is that of Brian Hyland, who of course did his hits "Itsy Bitsy", "Ginny Come Lately" and "Sealed With A Kiss", but also treated us to later stuff like "Gypsy Woman", crediting Curtis Mayfield in the process. The Chiffons launched straight into "One Fine Day", Judy in fine voice and looking lithe with a close-cropped blonde-red look a la Cissy Houston. She introduced her colleague, Ginger, and then herself as the original lead singer (to a round of applause). They then did "Da Doo Ron Ron", but not without first crediting the Crystals, Judy explaining that the Chiffons covered the song on one of their albums. There was a lot of "hey-girls-you-know-how-it-is-with-these-guys"-type rapping and they pulled a male "volunteer" from the audience on stage for "Will You Love Me Tomorrow", another album cover. "Sweet Talking Guy" followed, and they finished up with "He's So Fine". Bobby Vee spoke about the Brill Building and his Carole King- penned songs and sang just about everything you could wish for - "Rubber Ball", "Take Good Care Of My Baby", "How Many Tears" (getting the audience to join in with the backing vocals!), "The Night Has 1000 Eyes", "Run To Her", "Sharing You", "Please Don't Ask About Barbara", "Walking With My Angel", "Forever Kind Of Love" and even "Maybe Just Today". After the show, the singers all came out to sign stuff sure, they have CDs to sell too, but they seemed quite happy to talk. I had quite a long chat with Brian Hyland who was particularly friendly and we talked about his Philips stuff, which is my favourite period of his. He talked about Leon Russell and Hal Blaine being on the sessions and said he'd just been reading Hal Blaine's book. I'd recommend this show to UK Spectropoppers. Don't be misled by the "rock and roll" headliner sure there are rock and roll numbers (and good ones) but the show is totally underpinned by timeless Brill Building pop classics. Ian -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Mon, 04 Nov 2002 00:44:52 +0000 From: Simon White Subject: Re: Liking Bad Music Phil Milstein wrote: > Ever heard The Shaggs? I have to stick my two pen'orth in here. There is good bad but not evil and there is rubbish. And in my opinion The Shaggs stuff is utter, utter rubbish AND evil and I have always doubted its authenticity. Is it really genuine? And are they not men in wigs on the cover? Simon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Mon, 04 Nov 2002 01:02:19 -0000 From: Ian Chapman Subject: Davy Jones speeded-up Antonio wrote: > I have always loved "This Bouquet", a pretty nice song. > Although I think Davy Jones' voice on that recording > was artificially speeded. Yes, I've always thought the same about his "Dream Girl" 45. In fact, if you alter the pitch, it sounds much more natural. But the question is - why did they feel they had to make him sound like a Chipmunk in the first place? Ian -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
End

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