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Spectropop - Digest Number 651



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______________        S  P  E  C  T  R  O  P  O  P        ______________
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                        Jamie LePage (1953-2002)
                   http://www.spectropop.com/Jamie.htm
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Changin' the Subject
           From: Ron 
      2. Re: Knockin' the Hermits
           From: Phil Chapman 
      3. Re: You Know My Name / Gamma Goochie
           From: Phil Milstein 
      4. Re: You Know My Name / Gamma Goochie
           From: Bill Craig 
      5. Tom Dowd RIP
           From: Country Paul 
      6. Gregmark and Trey label discographies
           From: Mike Edwards 
      7. RE: Gregmark
           From: Phil Chapman 
      8. Dave Clark Five's Greatest Hits
           From: Mike Edwards 
      9. Re: You Know My Name / Gamma Goochie
           From: Eddy Smit 
     10. AMERICA AND THE BRITISH INVASION....  a more serious view...
           From: Louise Posnick 
     11. RE: Gregmark
           From: Guy Lawrence 
     12. RE: Gregmark
           From: Vincent Degiorgio 
     13. RE: Gregmark
           From: Phil Milstein 
     14. Re: Dave Clark Five's Greatest Hits
           From: Mikey 
     15. Re: Johnny Cymbal
           From: Marc Miller 
     16. Re: Bob Lind etc
           From: Norman 
     17. Re: Lounge Legends Series
           From: Mike Edwards 
     18. Re: Johnny Cymbal
           From: James Botticelli 
     19. Jack Nitzsche At Spectropop
           From: Martin Roberts 
     20. Seekers for sale
           From: Matthew Kaplan 
     21. Re: AMERICA AND THE BRITISH INVASION....  a more serious view...
           From: Neil Hever 
     22. Re: Knockin' the Hermits
           From: Richard Tearle 
     23. Re: Dave Clark Five's Greatest Hits
           From: Richard Tearle 
     24. Re: Johnny Cymbal
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     25. Music and emotion
           From: Peter Lerner 


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Message: 1
   Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 12:26:29 -0000
   From: Ron 
Subject: Re: Changin' the Subject

Lynn wrote: 
> And the Two of Clubs!  I have a copy of "Walk Tall".  They had 
> another hit, too, called "Heart".  I had forgotten that they 
> were a local group from the Cincinnati area.  The fab Teardrops 
> don't ring a bell.  What songs did they did and about what year?

The two Cincinnati hits I remember by the Teardrops were "Tonight I'm
Gonna Fall in Love Again", and my favorite, "Tears Come Tumbling". 
Very Shirelles like.  This was about '64 or '65.  Morton Downey Jr.
was a DJ on WCPO radio in Cincinnati at that time and made a big deal
about "Tears" being picked up by Musicor to go national.  I believe it
flirted with the national charts but never made it. I do remember
hearing it on WBZ in Boston on a late night AM dial search.  Check out
the great Spectropop page on the Teardrops.  My Teardrops question-
Was the Teardrops on Laurie the same group? 

Ron



-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 15:26:25 -0000 From: Phil Chapman Subject: Re: Knockin' the Hermits Richard Tearle: > My belief, for what its worth is that there is no such thing as > BAD music: its just whether you like it... I share a slightly different viewpoint; that there is 'bad' music, *and* you can still like it, rather like fast food is quite fun sometimes, even though you know it's not much good for you. It can get a bit wearing being repeatedly beaten with the cosh of absolute taste. I don't believe success in pop music is (or should be) directly proportional to talent, it is more a reflection of consumer preference. How we are exposed to the 'choices', however, is a much more contentious debate. From the numerous accounts of the so-called British Invasion, I go along with the view that it was the result of mass identification with a bunch of 'kids from down the street', an antidote to 'manufactured' pop music. Of course, the music industry was quick to catch on, and set about manufacturing 'real' bands. Going back in the annals of time when I was a DJ at a local 'youth club' in Manchester, I vaguely remember "Herman and His Hermits" appearing there once (or maybe twice) - and these relatively ordinary lads dreamed of "going down to London to make a record...". When they released their well-chosen cover of the more subtle Earl Jean Goffin-King record, which I'd already heard and liked, it was not difficult to predict which version of an obvious hit song the general public would 'identify' with. I think the whole cute, clean, British-lad image was a response to the wave of (mainly) American hysteria for the genre. I think they became what the public wanted. I doubt very much that they would have otherwise considered donning Pearly King outfits and recording Music Hall-type material. I mean, they were from Lancashire, the response may have been quite different had they got weilded a ukelele and dipped into the not-so-clean, innuendo-laden George Formby catalogue! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 08:49:44 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: You Know My Name / Gamma Goochie Stewart Mason wrote: > Does anyone know of any comnnection between "The Gamma Goochee Himself" > and the single "The Gamma Goochie" by the east Texas/Louisiana group > called the Persian Market? (It's on the Cicadelic Records comp CICADELIC > 60s VOLUME 2: NEVER EXISTED!) Their single is great. "(You Got) The Gamma Goochee" (as recorded by "The Gamma Goochee Himself") was a big enough hit to have inspired several cover versions, including by The Kingsmen and by The Tribe, on Shel Talmy's Planet label. The Persian Market, though, is a new one on me. Is there any way I could hear it? Eddy Smit wrote: > Gregmark # 1 was Sassy by a S & H Stamps S&H for Sill & Hazlewood? --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 13:10:56 -0000 From: Bill Craig Subject: Re: You Know My Name / Gamma Goochie Stewart writes: > To be fair, I don't think this is in the same league as > the "deliberately bad" flips, as it's clearly the boys > having a bit of Goons-inspired fun. It has a similar feel to fan club Christmas messages that the Fabs did for many years and clearly was fun for both the band and listeners. I enjoyed it very much, but put on the back of a single it wasn't likely to get turned over and get top 40 airplay, which was something that happened a lot with The Beatles. Regards, Bill -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 10:24:30 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Tom Dowd RIP Legendary engineer-producer Tom Dowd passed away last Sunday at age 77. Yesterday's (10/30/02) New York Times carried a major story on the obit page [log in required]. http://www.nytimes.com/2002/10/30/obituaries/30DOWD.html There is also a very interesting obit/article at Rhino Records, http://www.rhino.com/new/articles/tomdowd.html A few highlights: Legendary producer and engineer Tom Dowd passed away on Sunday, October 27th at the age of 77. When Rhino signed a distribution deal with Atlantic Records in the early 1990s, we had occasion to speak with Tom, who was one of the men most responsible for the label's rise to success.... "...I [later] got a great helper -- Arif Mardin. His first job with me was to work as my aide. The first thing we did together was The Rascals. I taught him how to do the down and dirty rhythm tracks and Arif would come up with additional composing and charts. It was Arif, Jerry [Wexler] and I, and we were a hell of a team. We were all together and it was natural to work together. When one of us came up with an idea we would go and do it...." "On Wilson [Pickett) I did 'Mustang Sally', 'I'm In Love', 'Stag-O-Lee', 'I'm A Midnight Mover', and 'Funky Broadway (Live In Ghana)'. I did that in Ghana for the film Soul To Soul; that's where that version came from. For 'Midnight Mover' I helped Wilson write that song -- I wrote a verse of it. But we didn't take the writing credit." "'I'm In Love' was a Bobby Womack song that nobody could figure out what to do with. When I first played it for Pickett he said it was as naked as a jaybird 'till I added in the rest of the music and mixed it. Then when I played it for him he had tears in his eyes." On Pop Vs. Soul: "...about '634-5789 (Soulsville, U.S.A.).' This was a Jerry Wexler production done with the Stax rhythm section. Steve Cropper was talking to me one day wondering why Motown songs went pop but our records only went on the soul charts and didn't cross over. I said that our songs were more soulful. Their songs were basically nursery rhymes because every word was accounted for -- our songs left space for the singers to improvise and that is what added the soul and the feeling to our songs. When Motown put out a song every syllable was on a beat. A couple weeks later Jerry came back and said I had a hit, and Cropper laughed, 'All right cousin, how do you like it -- we got a hit!' Everything was on the beat and that's how we got our pop hit with Wilson. Steve put every syllable on the beat, and that was the difference between a pop hit and a soul hit!" The rest is worth the read, too. Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 15:59:32 -0000 From: Mike Edwards Subject: Gregmark and Trey label discographies Country Paul asks: > "Paris Sisters were Gregmark #2. What was #1? Is there a > label discography anywhere? How about a Trey discography? " Label discographies are available at: http://www.recordmaster.com/ Set up a search under 7" and the name of the label you are looking for. The Gregmark search revealed that Sassy by the S&H Stamps was Gregmark 1. The Trey search found 24 singles, including one of my favorites, Bob Wilson's Ain't No Freckles On My Fish (Trey 3008). I see Kell Osbourne is on the Trey listing with Bells Of St Mary's (Trey 3006). His Quicksand on Titanic from 1963 was a great record, wasn't it? I urge all Spectropop members to bookmark Recordmaster.com. Mike Edwards -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 18:51:41 -0000 From: Phil Chapman Subject: RE: Gregmark Eddy Smit wrote: > Gregmark # 1 was Sassy by a S & H Stamps Phil M: > S&H for Sill & Hazlewood? Who (if any) were Greg & Mark? Phil -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 16:02:38 -0000 From: Mike Edwards Subject: Dave Clark Five's Greatest Hits Thanks to Steve Harvey for some interesting notes about the early years of the DC5. I was pleased to read that all the group members made out financially: I knew Dave did but was never sure about the others. One of the very best albums of the 60s was the DC5's Greatest Hits (US Epic, mono version). You drop the needle on side 1 and the whole thing just cooks through 10 solid pop tracks. Do You Love Me, Over And Over, Everybody Knows (1st version) they are all here and there is nothing "thin" about any of the cuts. Yes, I have the group's double CD, but I keep going back to this album as the collection of songs catches the group at its absolute peak. Mike Edwards -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 17:09:00 +0100 From: Eddy Smit Subject: Re: You Know My Name / Gamma Goochie > Gregmark # 1 was Sassy by a S & H Stamps Phil M: > S&H for Sill & Hazlewood? No idea, although I did find their name on a Lee Hazlewood site listed as L & H Scamps Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 07:34:14 -0800 From: Louise Posnick Subject: AMERICA AND THE BRITISH INVASION.... a more serious view... Reading so much about the British invasion in America and who was worth listening to and who wasn't...I wish to remind some of you folks that the British invasion, as it was called then, did an outrageous amount of damage to the, finally, recognized black artists of the times like Marvin Gaye...there was a great American, politcal push to get black artists off the top of the American teens' minds at this time...there were a number of specials on about the history of rock and roll over the past two years...and the reality was devastating to the black artists...many of us resented the money put into some talented and some not so talented British entertainers.....although many stating that if it wasn't for the black Americans music, they would have had no musical role models...they were pawns in the American machine to get rid of the black artist...and successful they were for awhile... survival is different than success.....so to some of us, the conversation about HH and DC5s' redeeming qualities seems beyond frivolous when we know the damage it all caused..talk to any black artist who remembers, even if they worked for Motown, and they will tell you what we were about and how we went about it....talent has nothing to do with the British invasion...it was political and for teenagers just fun...caught in the crossfire without even knowing it......but some of us did...... Louise -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Thu, 17 Oct 2002 22:52:11 -0700 From: Guy Lawrence Subject: RE: Gregmark Phil C wrote: > Who (if any) were Greg & Mark? Aren't they Lee's sons? Talking of Lee, Ace records have a double CD of the complete MGM recordings scheduled for release in Britain on Monday (I'll check to see if it's shipped). EMI also released a single disc of the MGM stuff recently as part of their "Lounge Legends" series. It's great that at last there are plenty of Lee Hazlewood CDs around but someone really ought to reissue "Love and Other Crimes" - surely his best album. Oh yeah - "Nancy & Lee Again" too! Regards, Guy Lawrence. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 11:27:44 -0800 From: Vincent Degiorgio Subject: RE: Gregmark Guy: > Talking of Lee, Ace records have a double CD of the complete > MGM recordings scheduled for release in Britain on Monday > (I'll check to see if it's shipped). EMI also released a > single disc of the MGM stuff recently as part of their > "Lounge Legends" series. Any idea where a complete list of the Lounge Legends series can be found ? Thanks, Vince -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 14:34:39 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: RE: Gregmark > Phil C wrote: > > Who (if any) were Greg & Mark? Guy Lawrence wrote: > Aren't they Lee's sons? Greg was Sill's son; Mark, Hazlewood's. > It's great that at last there are plenty of Lee Hazlewood > CDs around but someone really ought to reissue "Love and > Other Crimes" - surely his best album. "Poet Fool Or Bum" gets my vote, with "Forty" not far behind. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 14:35:41 -0500 From: Mikey Subject: Re: Dave Clark Five's Greatest Hits Mike Edwards: > One of the very best albums of the 60s was the DC5's Greatest Hits > (US Epic, mono version). You drop the needle on side 1 and the whole > thing just cooks through 10 solid pop tracks. Yes, that was a good decision on Len Levy's part, because "Over and Over" had just hit #1. They had 9 previous hits, so that made one great LP!! And you're right, that LP just cooks. Any Way You Want It is just an AMAZING record. How they even got that on vinyl without the cutting needle exploding is beyond me. The limiter must have been in overdrive on that one!! Your Friend, Mikey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 15:11:06 -0500 From: Marc Miller Subject: Re: Johnny Cymbal Mike Rashkow: > I used to write with John Cymbal. Was he Derek (of Cinnamon fame)? Marc -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Fri, 01 Nov 2002 06:53:26 +1030 From: Norman Subject: Re: Bob Lind etc Country Paul evokes memories of my early teen years. I was with my brother when he bought that Verve LP way back when. I think it was entitled "The Elusive Bob Lind". I remember the department store we got it from....today it is a Law Court Complex! When we got home I remember my brother and I searching high and low for "Elusive Butterfly" and being disappointed on it not being included. It was a very good lesson for us that we have carried with us into the new century. That is, read the bloody cover or label before buying anything. Oh, fond memories. (we still have that LP somewhere so I will endeavour to dig it up) Norman -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 15:24:06 -0500 From: Mike Edwards Subject: Re: Lounge Legends Series Vincent Degiorgio asks: > Any idea where a complete list of the Lounge Legends series can > be found? Try http://www.Amazon.com and/or http://www.Amazon.co.uk. Search under Lounge Legends and a number of the titles in this series come up. Don't forget, if you live in the US and order from Amazon.co.uk, they lop off that big 17.5% sales tax (I think that's the rate) before they bill you. My Castle Pulse "Chapel Of Love" triple CD girl group set was billed to me at less than 6 UK pounds! Alright, I had to pick up the shipping, but what a phenomenal deal for a top quality set. Mike Edwards -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 15:43:20 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Johnny Cymbal Marc Miller wrote: > Was he Derek (of Cinnamon fame)? Which makes me think of Drafi, "Marble Breaks & Iron Bends" -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Wed, 30 Oct 2002 22:33:37 -0000 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Jack Nitzsche At Spectropop I'm working well at the moment. P.J. Proby is featured on Record Of The Week with an obscure UK B side, "Sweet Summer Wine". The KHJ Boss radio jingle has also been updated. Phil C. has kindly found the time amongst his heavy press, radio and TV interviews to 'clean & process' the recording:-) Martin http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/index.htm -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 09:33:42 EST From: Matthew Kaplan Subject: Seekers for sale An interesting item from the Herald and Weekly Times, 31oct02: Seekers For Sale - By NUI TE KOHA FAMED pop group the Seekers are up for sale. The group that endured for 40 years will sell its catalogue of classic songs, vintage film footage and band trademark to the highest bidder in a historic tender. The Seekers, led by Judith Durham, were a revolutionary force in folk pop, and were the first Australian band to succeed overseas with major hits including Georgy Girl and The Carnival Is Over. Music industry sources say their catalogue is worth a fortune. Prospective buyers have been told to expect to pay between $1 million and $10 million. "They have decided to sell the family farm", Seekers manager John Kovacs told the Herald Sun yesterday. "We are talking 40 years of heritage. We are talking about one of the most blue-chip catalogues in the world." It is understood the Seekers -- Durham, Bruce Woodley, Keith Potger and Athol Guy -- are selling up because they want to close that chapter forever. But sources say the band members have disliked each other for years and probably want to sever all ties, personal and professional. "We are talking about four very different individuals," Mr Kovacs said. "It's come to a point where they have decided they all want to go their separate ways, do other things, and not have the responsibility of a business all the time." Woodley lives in Bali, Durham divides her time between Melbourne and London, Potger is based in Perth, and Guy in Woodend. Mr Kovacs said Durham was emotional about the sale. "The fact is, someone is going to buy her voice, and she is very emotional about that aspect. We are talking about the sale of something that is so unique, that only four special people are able to create," he said. Mr Kovacs said the Seekers' music had passed the test of time. "Music is so disposable. What is a hit today, is gone tomorrow, and forgotten about the next day. But the Seekers are different. "Their music stood the test of time. They have been going strong for 40 years. And now, all of that -- the history and the legacy -- is up for sale." Lawyer Paul O'Gorman, who is handling the sale, said the tender marked the first time an Australian music legend has sold its music, visuals and trademark. "They are at a point where they think: 'We've worked hard, we want to take it easy and cash in on the repertoire we have developed and the copyrights we own'," he said. The rights to Seekers' albums up for sale include Morningtown Ride, BBC Farewell Spectacular and Silver Jubilee.The successful tender will have entitlement to income from every Seekers' recording, including A World Of Our Own, Georgy Girl and The Carnival Is Over. "There are houses and stocks on the market, but when do you ever get the opportunity to own Australians of the Year, and music that stood the test of time for 40 years and will go one forever?" said Mr Kovacs. Rock historian Glenn A. Baker said the sale was intriguing. "They are virtually selling their assets and their trade and that is unheard of", he said. "If you are asking me whether the Seekers are a bankable investment, then yes, they certainly are. This is almost a story for the financial pages." The Seekers will play their final shows in March. The tender closes on December 2. privacy Herald and Weekly Times -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 20:48:22 -0000 From: Neil Hever Subject: Re: AMERICA AND THE BRITISH INVASION.... a more serious view... Louise Posnick wrote: > Reading so much about the British invasion in America and > who was worth listening to and who wasn't...I wish to remind > some of you folks that the British invasion, as it was called > then, did an outrageous amount of damage... Louise, I read your post and was truly puzzled. You wrote about some vague "political" effort to rid the airwaves of black music in America during the 60s. What specifically are you talking about? The British Invasion was simply a concerted effort to import the successful English acts to America and capitalize on sales of a (so called) new form rock and roll. I don't subscribe to this kind of conspiracy theory business so please enlighten us with the details. I recall enjoying tons of black music back in the 60s right alongside the British Invasion material. The Shirelles, The Supremes, The Four Tops, James Brown, Otis Redding, Sam Cooke, The Temptations, Chubby Checker, Martha and the Vandellas, Aretha Franklin, The Chambers Brothers, Smokey Robinson and the Miracles and dozens of others graced the airwaves and turntables of my youth. One might say with little reference to any scientific study that popular black music in America experienced its greatest growth both artistically and economically during the 1960s. While it is true British versions of songs like "House Of The Rising Sun" eclipsed the popularity of their predecessors there was still a great explosion of black music creativity in America. I'm truly puzzled by your observation to the contrary. Neil Hever -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 21:53:30 -0000 From: Richard Tearle Subject: Re: Knockin' the Hermits Phil Chapman wrote: > I share a slightly different viewpoint; that there is 'bad' music, > *and* you can still like it, rather like fast food is quite fun > sometimes, even though you know it's not much good for you. > .... I doubt very much that they would have otherwise > considered donning Pearly King outfits Phil, I respect your opinion; I think perhaps what I was trying to say that too many people hear a piece of music (whatever genre) and say blithely 'oh that's rubbish.' Their only criteria is that THEY don't like it. I'm not, for example, a great lover of jazz - but by God I wish I could play like that!! I do tend to agree with your analysis of why the British groups were so successful - some more so in the States than they were over here! However, I must take you to task on one point...I knew a group called The Cockneys! They were originally the Falcons and released a record called Stampede (the obligatory instrrumental) and actually appeared on TV's 5 o'Clock Club with Mu Young and Pussy Cat Willum - such is fame! However discovering another group called the Falcons they called themselves The New Falcons - no that's something else! They became The Cockneys, signed to Fontana under Tom Sporingfield and had two records out. Roger Hart, the rhythm guitarist was my neighbour and he told me that those Pearly King outfits were the devil to clean! Sad to say they disappeared without trace after that...Cheers Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 22:01:43 -0000 From: Richard Tearle Subject: Re: Dave Clark Five's Greatest Hits Talk of the DC5 reminds me so much of cuban heels stomping at Tottenham Royal however, I wanna tell you a story....around 1967/8 (I can't remember exactly) I was a-courtin' a young lady from the typing pool, as you do, but things were not working out too well. We decided to meet to talk things over - on a bench in Whetstone High Road would you believe. We talked a bit and then she gave me a present: Yup, a Dave Clark 5 record. Everybody Knows, the first, slow, weepy version...how could we part after that? The story has a happy ending: that girl was to become my future ex-wife!!! Cheers, Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 17:44:09 EST From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Johnny Cymbal Question: > Was (Johnny Cymbal) Derek, of Cinnamon fame? Indeed he was. Though his brother went on the road as Derek. He did that stuff with George Tobin I think. It was on Bang, no? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2002 22:48:10 -0000 From: Peter Lerner Subject: Music and emotion I know that many of us are musical experts - people who have produced and engineered great records, and people who can write coherently and articulately about it. So what I would like to explore is what music does to our emotions, and how it achieves this effect. I'm not talking about why I find Jackie DeShannon's voice irresistable, while Dusty Springfield's does nothing for me at all (Dusty fans please do not rise to that one, it's just an example). Nor about the thread I started last year about the music that makes us get up and dance. I think I want to know why some music brings tears to my eyes - is it the lyrics, something about the shape of the music and tonal sequences, or some production trick. Not a good example for Spectropop possibly is Kate and Anna McGarrigle's "Matapedia", but this brings the water welling without fail. And the Tim Rose song "Come away Melinda" - OK it's a sad song, but so is Rolf Harris' "Two little boys" which just has the effect of making me head for the OFF button. And what brought this topic to mind was listening in my car, on my journey to work, to Hot Chocolate and "It started with a kiss". You might say it's a maudlin song and OK you're entitled to your view, but for me it is a compelling and very emotional mix of lyrics, a great voice and something about the actual music, too. That voice singing those words to the tune of "All you need is love" wouldn't have the same effect. And is it perhaps a lot to do with voices. The very under-rated Wanda Jackson, in her early-ish 60s country period, can have a remarkable effect on my tear ducts - try her versions of the Hank Williams classics "I'm so lonesome I could cry" or "Weary blues from waiting". So what I'd appreciate some help on is why - and how - music can have this effect. Peter -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
End

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