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Spectropop - Digest Number 590



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______________        S  P  E  C  T  R  O  P  O  P        ______________
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                        Jamie LePage (1953-2002)
                  http://www.spectropop.com/Jamie.htm
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: The Knack (U.S. 60s group)
           From: Neil Hever 
      2. King Curtis & Mickey Baker
           From: Kingsley Abbott 
      3. Re: Wayne Cochran's stature
           From: Doug 
      4. Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory?
           From: Neil Hever 
      5. The Knack
           From: Mike Dugo 
      6. Re: The Knack (U.S. 60s group)
           From: Phil Chapman 
      7. Re: MAIN WAYNES
           From: james botticelli 
      8. Re: Quiz
           From: Phil Chapman 
      9. Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory?
           From: Dan Hughes 
     10. Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory?
           From: Freya 
     11. Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory?
           From: Phil Milstein 
     12. Mothers / Gold Star Acetate / Dean Courtney
           From: Leonardo Flores 
     13. Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory?
           From: Neil Hever 
     14. Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory?
           From: Dan Hughes 
     15. Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory?
           From: james botticelli 
     16. Re:  Clear Channel and Randy Michaels
           From: Dan Hughes 
     17. Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory?
           From: Dave 
     18. Tight playlists
           From: Thomas Taber 
     19. Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory?
           From: James Botticelli 
     20. Re: The Knack (U.S. 60s group)
           From: Jeffrey Glenn 
     21. Re: The not-so-elusive Malcolm Dodds
           From: Jeffrey Glenn 
     22. Re: I'm just a DUMBHEAD!
           From: Jeffrey Glenn 
     23. Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory?
           From: Stephanie Campbell 
     24. Re: I'm just a DUMBHEAD!
           From: Keiko Kondo 
     25. Re: Radio blows
           From: Nick Archer 


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Message: 1
   Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 17:13:05 -0000
   From: Neil Hever 
Subject: Re: The Knack (U.S. 60s group)

Jeffrey Glenn wrote:
> Does someone know if this group - not to be confused with 
> the U.K. group that recorded several singles from 1965-67 
> - released any more records....

Jeff, I have the Knack single "Time waits for no one" and 
it is very good.  I have not seen a collection in the states 
but a band this good must have something.  I'll look through 
my collection for more material. 
Cheers, 
Neil Hever



-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 12:36:31 +0100 From: Kingsley Abbott Subject: King Curtis & Mickey Baker Rashkovsky's mention of King Curtis and Mickey 'Guitar' Baker just now was quite a coincidence as I had just finished writing a review for an album that features both of them prominently - it is "More Rockin' On Broadway" recently released on Ace CDCHD 853. Their contributions really lift several of the tracks. It comes from the Time/Brent/Shad/Warner labels. The album covers the '58 - '61 period mainly, so may be a tad early for some folks tastes, but it does rock! Kingsley -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 14:01:13 -0000 From: Doug Subject: Re: Wayne Cochran's stature Norman wrote: Re: Wayne Cochran > Was he the same bloke who had a hit with "Last Kiss" (that > song Pearl Jam covered recently) or is he someone else? He did it first, but J. Frank Wilson had the hit with it. Doug -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 16:42:01 -0000 From: Neil Hever Subject: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory? Hi Spectropoppers, I'm pretty new to the list. Some of you may not be directly affected by this kind of thing if you live outside the U.S. but I'm sure you can relate to the subject: I'm very disgusted with the way commercial stations select and play music. It is not unusual to encounter an "oldies" station with a 300 song rotation. Astounding isn't it? Three or four decades of fantastic music limited to 300 songs! The choice of music is dictated no doubt by focus groups and cockamamie research. It means hearing "Hanky panky" or "Cool Jerk" over and over again. Arguably they are both entertaining songs but potentially annoying when played to excess. Even groups like The Beatles with a 7 year history (in the U.S.) of hit records and albums are reduced to 8 or 9 tracks! I don't expect oldies stations to play obscure things like "Blue Jay Way" or "Mr. Moonlight" but couldn't they unclench their butt cheeks long enough to program lesser know songs from the Beatles catalogue? Our collective memory of great music is being robbed by these so-called oldies stations - a term that nauseates me by the way. Fortunately, I work in public radio. Our station programmed a salute to soul music this summer and I had an epiphany. One of our hosts played The Edwin Hawkin's Singers "Oh, Happy Day", a gorgeous pop/gospel track from 1969. I remembered it but was still shocked to learn it was a top 10 song and a Grammy winner! Why isn't it on the radio? Best wishes, Neil Hever -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 12:38:44 -0500 From: Mike Dugo Subject: The Knack Sorry, Jeff - I can't help you with the Knack's discography, but I for one am interested in hearing the tracks. Mike Dugo 60sgaragebands -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 18:41:25 -0000 From: Phil Chapman Subject: Re: The Knack (U.S. 60s group) Hi Jeff, Spotted another Knack single from '67, Capitol 5889 - Softly Softly/The Spell -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 14:47:36 -0400 From: james botticelli Subject: Re: MAIN WAYNES Mike Rashkow wrote: > another white R&B talent was Billy > Harner out of Philly. who did an excellent and very early (about '71 or '72) Philly- disco styled cover of chuck Jackson's "I Don't Wanna Cry" toward the end of his solo career -- Jimmy Botticelli Taking The E-Z...Way Out! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 19:21:00 -0000 From: Phil Chapman Subject: Re: Quiz Well, it's all quite exciting nowadays - Spectropop parties, past and proposed, newly-discovered girlgroup acetates and an entire Jack Nitzsche site. BUT...I like mysteries, and I'm curious to know the answer to M. Anthony's quiz. We can't let your prize go unclaimed. Can only think they were all covered by the same artist? Give us a clue! > what connects them all? > > Dry Your Eyes - Brenda & the Tabulations > Lovin' Things - The Grass Roots > Save The Last Dance For Me - The Drifters > Where Do You Go? - Cher > They Call My Guy A Tiger - Jody Miller > A Well Respected Man - The Kinks > Second Fiddle Girl - Barbara Lynn > Can't Get Over (The Bossa Nova) - Eydie Gorme > The Day The Rains Came Down - Jane Morgan > Hello Mary Lou - Ricky Nelson > Torture - Kris Jensen > Snap Your Fingers - Joe Henderson > Calendar Girl - Neil Sedaka > Anyone Who Had A Heart - Dionne Warwick > She's A Fool - Lesley Gore > Foot Tapper - The Shadows > Ya Ya - Lee Dorsey > What Do You Want - Adam Faith -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 14:21:19 -0500 From: Dan Hughes Subject: Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory? Hi Neil, The sad truth is that commercial radio has to sell advertising to pay its way, and advertisers buy ads on the stations with the most listeners. If your town had two oldies stations--the one it has now (call it WAAA), and another (WBBB) with a longer playlist as you suggest, then WAAA would win the ratings war, and hence the advertising dollars, hands-down. People who are really into music would love WBBB. Everybody else would listen to WAAA. And unfortunately, our group--folks who know the music well and love it tremendously--are a drop in the bucket. Advertisers can't be bothered with such a tiny fringe. It would be commercial suicide to follow your suggestion.... But you really knew that already, didn't you? ---Dan (General Manager of a college radio station) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 20:19:58 -0000 From: Freya Subject: Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory? > The sad truth is that commercial radio has to sell advertising to > pay its way, and advertisers buy ads on the stations with the most > listeners. There is a facinating interview with the head of clear channel out there somewhere, in which he basically hints that commercial radio is full of just rubbish himself. (Well you know you have to read between the lines) Clear Channel have a virtual monopoly on american radio. They are also in some financial difficulty from all the debt they have accumulated from the aquisition on all the radio stations. They feel they can't take any chances and have to do whatever they can to get the maximum revenue, so they play music that focus groups and stuff like that dictate. The head of clear channel was talking about how he would love to start a commercial station that just played stuff like sinatra and all that kind of stuff. I think he was going to call it Vegas Radio or something I don't know, he had all this marketing worked out and it was quite a commercial idea for a station, but in the current market, even that was just unfeasable. I don't know it's a facinating interview and it's somewhere out there on the internet! Go and find it! ;) Depressing stuff, although one amusing thing is that apparently the major labels are complaining that they are now virtually having to pay radio stations to play their records because of the dreadful monopoly! Ah! You reap what you sow! :) love Freya -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 15:47:07 +0000 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory? Dan Hughes wrote: > People who are really into music would love WBBB. > Everybody else would listen to WAAA. Why do you suppose it is that the non-fanatic music-listening public prefers such a limited rotation of songs? --Phil Milstein -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 20:40:22 -0000 From: Leonardo Flores Subject: Mothers / Gold Star Acetate / Dean Courtney Hello all, Thanks everybody for the info on the Gold Star Chuck Barris Syndicate Goldstar Acetate. It's really a great song and I hope to play it on Musica soon, I'll keep you all informed when that happens. Ray Collins Frank Zappa and the Mothers Answers: When did Frank and Ray Meet? Ray says they met in 1961 in a bar in Pomona. The bar had changed ownership and Zappa's band was going to play and Ray met him that night. They started to write songs together and Frank bought Sudio Z in Cucamonga. They had recorded a bunch of different types of music including Doo Wop. Get this, when Frank was arrested for his lewed tapes incident, all of his reel to reel tapes, hundreds, were confiscated and were never to be seen again, they were either destroyed or thrown out and Ray says he hasn't see them since that incident. He says a lot of great songs were recorded by them during that time. Cruising with Ruban and the Jets: Ray doesn't know who wrote the liner notes for the LP but he says it's safe to say it was Frank. if you haven't read the liner notes for the LP, it's a very truthful spoof of growing up Latino/LA DooWop music scene in Los Angeles during the late 50's early 60's. Almost the same story my POP tells about how it was, of course the dog names were different Funny Ontario Porno Films (!): Ray says that Frank made a bunch of Funny Porno Films in Ontario, go figure! Why he told me this info I don't know, but maybe they had soundtracks or something. I guess once a Mother always a Mother. Dean Courtney @ the 45 Club: Soul Artist Dean Courtney who recorded on RCA, MGM and Berkley (check your John Manship Record Guide, Specropoppers he is listed..) was a surprise guest at the 45 Club last month. My good friend Gabby, who's a big Northern Soul DJ out here in LA, brought him over as a special surprise guest for the club. He even brought over his original RCA soul 45 and we had the pleasure to spin the 45 on a packed floor for him. Afterwards we had a late night dinner and talked to him at Canters Deli in Hollywood. Truly a night I will never forget. We'll have photos on the 45 Club Website soon http://www.the45club.com Also thanks to all you Spectropoppers who came out for the CD Cellarful Of Motown Univeral/Motwon Music contest, the first winner was a Spectropop Club Member! Cheers and God Bless, Leonardo -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 21:34:00 -0000 From: Neil Hever Subject: Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory? Dan et al, I used to work in commercial radio so I am acutely aware of how it operates. My argument is that the playlists do not have to be as tight as they are. I think the focus group and polling must be fundamentally flawed. When your rotation gets down to 300 songs that is just pathetic. To answer the question - why do people pick these songs - I would say the answer lies in the polling. The polls are only looking for something people immediately recognize. Your average listener, given half a chance, might really enjoy hearing "Tell Me Why" or "Things We Said Today" by the Beatles once in awhile. Note I said given half the chance. They never get that chance. That is my theory. Well, the day will come when on demand web or satellite radio will penetrate the market and these kinds of stations will suffer. It may be happening already. Neil Hever -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 16:34:40 -0500 From: Dan Hughes Subject: Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory? Phil Milstein: > Why do you suppose it is that the non-fanatic music-listening > public prefers such a limited rotation of songs? Because to them, music is background, not something to be studied, compared, and analyzed, as we nuts enjoy doing. The typical oldies listener wants to hear only songs he knows. And he didn't listen much in the old days, so he only knows the songs that got played to death when they were new. And that's what he wants to hear now. Yucck. ---Dan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 17:40:14 -0400 From: james botticelli Subject: Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory? Freya wrote: > Clear Channel have a virtual monopoly on american radio. > They are also in some financial difficulty from all the > debt they have accumulated from the aquisition on all the > radio stations. They feel they can't take any chances and > have to do whatever they can to get the maximum revenue, so > they play music that focus groups and stuff like that dictate. I think its safe to say that Corporate America will soon reap what it's sewn and the landscape will be cleared for new endeavors. Then again there's Colorado Springs...... JB/half a cup is not enough -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 16:45:52 -0500 From: Dan Hughes Subject: Re: Clear Channel and Randy Michaels Ironically enough, the head of Clear Channel that gave that interview was Randy Michaels, who just last month was fired from the job. (He was reassigned to a technical job, believe it or not). Michaels was a notorious program director at WLW in Cincinnati, and one of his pranks is legendary (and got him arrested): A rival station had a contest--a huge box was atop a downtown Cincinnati office building, and listeners had to guess what was in the box. Clues were given on the air, and on a particular morning the box would be opened. Tremendous interest was developed in the promotion, and the morning the box was opened, thousands of people were downtown to see what would emerge. What emerged, much to the surprise of the audience, and even more to the surprise of the radio station, was the morning man from Michaels' WLW! He had been helicoptered to the top of the building in the middle of the night and ensconced himself in the box until the grand unveiling. Station X had both the DJ and Michaels arrested. Those were the days.... ---Dan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 18:41:38 EDT From: Dave Subject: Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory? Neil Hever: > I'm very disgusted with the way commercial stations select and > play music. It is not unusual to encounter an "oldies" > station with a 300 song rotation. Astounding isn't it? Three or > four decades of fantastic music limited to 300 songs! For some of these stations, 300 songs would be a vast improvement. There's a "classic soul" station around here whose entire playlist lasts about 4 hours (with commercials), then they repeat. Is it really surprising that the Powers That Be have targeted internet radio lately? -dave -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 15:44:52 -0700 (PDT) From: Thomas Taber Subject: Tight playlists A personal pet peeve, and I believe that super tight playlists are pure caca. Why not find the world's most popular song and play it round the clock? Obviously the best playlist is a number greater than one and less than 5000, but my heart and my having gone through hundreds of peoples' 45 collections brain tells me the right number is probably around 2000. A Toronto station that plays "oldies" (for want of a better term) Friday and Saturday nights, AM 740 whose signal must reach half of North America, mentioned recently what their most requested song was - not from Spectropop fanatic weirdos like us, but the listening public - BABY SITTIN'BOOGIE, a song I haven't heard on any oldies station in like forever! Kids love it instantly, it's funny, it rocks its butt off, the later German language version went top 10 in Chicago, and no one plays the darn thing! And you can't tell me that their aren't enough people in the world with Spectropop-like tastes to support something wild on one of the 100 or more pay-to-listen satellite radio endeavors! "The Underground Garage" show seems to be doing well, and it certainly isn't catering to the lowest common denominator. And hey, thank you folks who write in all the time for making our lives more interesting! Tom "Smells Like Camp Granada" Taber -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 19:32:15 -0400 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory? Previously: > I'm very disgusted with the way commercial stations select and > play music. It is not unusual to encounter an "oldies" > station with a 300 song rotation. Astounding isn't it? Three or > four decades of fantastic music limited to 300 songs! a reply: > For some of these stations, 300 songs would be a vast improvement. > There's a "classic soul" station around here whose entire playlist > lasts about 4 hours (with commercials), then they repeat. Is it > really surprising that the Powers That Be have targeted internet > radio lately? We're quite fortunate in Boston to have WILD which is a classic soul format that digs deeeep. They spent the 8T's and 9T's trying to keep up with all the kiss and jamn type stations and finally returned to their roots in 2000. (At age 50 they finally got the faith) They also have "the Time Tunnel" on Saturday mornings from 8-12 where they play flipsides of followup hits and such. Then they follow that with the "Time Tunnel Block Party" all Saturday afternoon with DJ-mixed soul, funk and disco classics, dusties, and material from the back of the 'vault'. Too good to be true. Its only drawback is that its a 'daytimer'. But you can hear the pawn shop, shyster lawyer, and generic nationwide AM commercials. All in all not a bad deal. JB/used to work there and had to fight to program lesser known material -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 16:34:27 -0700 From: Jeffrey Glenn Subject: Re: The Knack (U.S. 60s group) Phil: > Spotted another Knack single from '67, > Capitol 5889 - Softly Softly/The Spell Hi Phil, Damn! :-) Guess I've got to keep looking (there's actually a copy on a Japanese web site - a Toshiba/Japan copy - into which I'm checking). And Freeman and Mike and others who want the titles I already have played to musica, I'll do it as space allows as not to monopolize the files section. :-) But... if anyone can't wait they're already available on (cough, cough) WinMX. ;-) Again, thanks Phil for the additional info. This one sounds like a goody! Neil Hever wrote: > Jeff, I have the Knack single "Time waits for no one" and > it is very good. I have not seen a collection in the states > but a band this good must have something. I'll look through > my collection for more material. Neil, thanks for checking further. You've already no doubt seen that Phil came up with another one. And you're dead right about "Time Waits For No One" too - a true collector's classic. And "I'm Aware" on the flip is pretty cool too! Jeff -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 16:35:49 -0700 From: Jeffrey Glenn Subject: Re: The not-so-elusive Malcolm Dodds Paul, thanks for the info on Malcolm Dodds - I knew there had to be something out there. "Look For The Union Label" rocks! :-) Jeff -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 16:45:21 -0700 From: Jeffrey Glenn Subject: Re: I'm just a DUMBHEAD! > PS: I agree, it's a great record. You should hear Ginny's > Japanese-language version! Mick, could you play this to musica? This must sound positively surreal! :-) Jeff -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 21:36:00 -0700 From: Stephanie Campbell Subject: Re: Commercial radio - robbing our collective memory? I hear people all the time wondering why they dont hear things like Morning Girl - Neon Philharmonic Whos in the Strawberry Patch with Sally - Tony Orlando and Dawn Automatically Sunshine - Supremes Put your Hands Together - OJays Tommy Roe - Stagger Lee Ray Stevens - Unwind and Mr Businessman and countless other records that charted in the top 30!! Its a shame I see people whose faces lite up if a record comes on that they have not heard in 20 years and its time for those days to come back, If they had left things the way they were they wouldnt be in this big mess. Its time for independents to come back and bring back the old music Steph -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Fri, 06 Sep 2002 02:06:27 -0000 From: Keiko Kondo Subject: Re: I'm just a DUMBHEAD! > PS: I agree, it's a great record. You should hear Ginny's > Japanese-language version! > > Mick, could you play this to musica? This must sound positively > surreal! :-) Hi Mick, I want to hear this tooooooooo Please.;-) KK -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Thu, 05 Sep 2002 21:14:02 -0500 From: Nick Archer Subject: Re: Radio blows I worked for a Lee Abrams programmed station in the late 70's. Each of his 250 consulted stations across the country played exactly the same songs each week. When I asked why we had to quit playing some old Creedence songs, they told me with a straight face that they had distributed over 900,000 survey cards in airports the previous year, and that people remembered Proud Mary but not Green River. Of course this is the same Lee Abrams who is now head of programming for XM satellite radio. The problem is that the money people control the creative people. They don't want to do ANYTHING that might lose a listener, so they keep the experience safe and in a box. I've also worked at stations that did it right. More on that tomorrow. Nick Archer Check out Nashville's classic SM95 on the web at www.live365.com/stations/289419 . One that did it right. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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