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Spectropop - Digest Number 500



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______________        S  P  E  C  T  R  O  P  O  P        ______________
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                        Jamie LePage (1953-2002)
                  http://www.spectropop.com/Jamie.htm
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There are 21 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Brian W.
           From: beatle bob 
      2. Jonathan King
           From: Will Stos 
      3. losin' it
           From: Jack Madani 
      4. Earl Sink; A&M artists
           From: Paul Payton 
      5. Re: Polly Brown
           From: Paul Richards 
      6. Central Park Arrest
           From: jack madani 
      7. No B.Wilson in chart
           From: richard hattersley 
      8. DAVE GODIN vs MICK JAGGER
           From: Mick Patrick 
      9. Re: DAVE GODIN vs MICK JAGGER
           From: simon white 
     10. Re: Dave Godin vs Mick Jagger
           From: Mike Edwards 
     11. New At Spectropop
           From: The Spectropop Team
     12. Re: No B.Wilson in chart
           From: Bret Wheadon 
     13. the sequins
           From: David Bell 
     14. New 'Motown salutes Bacharach' CD
           From: Bret Wheadon 
     15. Re: DAVE GODIN vs MICK JAGGER
           From: Richard Havers 
     16. DOROTHY LOVE COATES
           From: Mick Patrick 
     17. Re: DAVE GODIN vs MICK JAGGER
           From: Norman 
     18. Re: THE SEQUINS
           From: Mick Patrick 
     19. Polly Brown!
           From: Vlaovic B 
     20. Polly Brown
           From: Peter Richmond 
     21. Ain't Gonna Kiss Ya
           From: james botticelli 


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Message: 1
   Date: Mon, 10 Jun 2002 23:23:27 +0000
   From: beatle bob 
Subject: Re: Brian W.

Hey Kingsley,

So great to hear your review of the Brian Wilson concert. Let's 
all hope he continues to tour and entertain with his superlative 
talent.

And speaking of great shows in your area, I hope you can make it 
out to London on either June 17 or June 22 to catch one of the 
greatest live performances you'll ever have seen in recent memory.

All the way from Dallas, Texas comes Polyphonic Spree; a 28-piece 
ensemble comprised of a 15-piece choir, piano, french horn, flute, 
brass, strings, guitars, bass and theremin.

The best way to describe Polyphonic Spree's music is to imagine if 
Brian Wilson had finished his symphonies to God using members of 
Phil Spector's Wrecking Crew as his musicians with a touch of Sgt. 
Pepper's orchestral arrangements. All of this backed by the choir's 
gospel-tinged Beach Boy harmonies. And the entire band wears white 
gospel robes.

I caught Polyphonic Spree three times during the recent South By 
Southwest Music Conference and was absolutely stunned by each and 
every performance.

You can catch their performances during the David Bowie's Meltdown 
Festival at the Royal Festival Hall on June 17 and 22.

For those New York Spectropoppers, you can catch Polyphonic Spree
performing in you're area from June 25-30 throughout various venues
in you're area. Check out their amamzing website for the venues and 
dates in your area.
http://www.thepolyphonicspree.com

A must see show for all Spectropoppers!

Beatle Bob



-------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Mon, 10 Jun 2002 23:41:20 -0000 From: Will Stos Subject: Jonathan King Ian Slater wrote: > Don't Let Him Touch You (King) > Rainy Day (King) > Both "Invented, Imagined, Conceived, Created, Produced and > Directed by Jonathan King" Thanks for the info Ian. Still being quite green behind the ears compared to most of this group when it comes to 60s/70s music, I had never really heard of Jonathan King before this week, when I found and enjoyed two of his female vocal productions, the Piglets' "Johnny Reggae", and now the Angelettes' "Don't Let Him Touch You". The only thing I seem to remember being said about him was that you pretty much either loved his work or hated it. For better or for worse, I love what I heard so far. Any reccomendations of other choice cuts? Being a girl-group-a-holic, female vocal cuts would be my first choice : ) Thanks, Will -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Mon, 10 Jun 2002 22:10:24 -0500 From: Jack Madani Subject: losin' it Jimmy C writes: >the one song that made me crazy for most of the year it was a >hit was Bobby Goldsboro's "Honey". I know there's nothing >redeeming about it, and it pushes all the wonk buttons and >manipulates the listener's tear ducts to near dryness, but >objectively-speaking... it does me in every time. Not ME, Jimmy C.! Goldsboro's "Honey" freaked me OUT when I first heard it. One day, for no reason, the Angels came for Honey? Holy crap, they could be coming for ME next! "Honey" had the same effect on me as a kid as when I happened to catch the Val Lewton flick "The Bodysnatchers" on the Late Show. I slept with the lights on and the covers over my head for a *week*. Now, you wanna talk about tunes that was guaranteed to start me bawlin, then you need to mention Clarence Carter's "Patches." Hoo-EE! (okay, and one other, but don't tell anyone I said this one would make me cry: Elvis' "In The Ghetto.") jack who thinks he has something in his eye -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2002 00:50:02 -0400 From: Paul Payton Subject: Earl Sink; A&M artists David Ponak and Mikey, thanks for the additional Earl Sink info. Jan Kristensen, "Superstitious" was the flip of "Little Suzy Parker" if I remember correctly; I didn't know what happened to Earl Sink afterward, though. For our UK correspondents, I hear a great segue from "Little Suzy Parker" to Joe Brown's magnificent "Teardrops In The Rain." (The compression on that one is worthy of Joe Meek!) David Ponak cites the astonishing http://www.onamrecords.com/index.html One could get lost in their guide to A&M artists' websites, http://www.onamrecords.com/Official_Artist_Web_Sites.html - There's even a link to a Spooky Tooth website (yep, they're still around - loved 'em in their A&M period)! It's http://www.spookytooth.com natch - and check the picture of them today! And congratulations, Spectropop, on Digest 500! It's nice to be part of it. Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2002 08:13:18 -0000 From: Paul Richards Subject: Re: Polly Brown Norman: > "Up In A Puff of Smoke" would have to had been one of the first > GTO releases. Vincent Degiorgio: > I know that somewhere in my vinyl collection I have a 12" single > of her follow up to Smoke and remember it wasn't a hit, but I > played it anyhow...did they every do an album with her ? Yeh, a friend of mine had the LP,as I recall 'Up in a Puff of Smoke' was the only standout. Polly was also in a duo called 'Sweet Dreams', who had a UK 74 hit with an early Abba cover of 'Honey Honey'. Apparently, as her partner was black, she had to wear heavy beige make-up & a dark wig, she was a natural blonde! I've got the Top of the Pops appearance on video, it's quite funny. Paul R -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2002 17:06:52 -0000 From: jack madani Subject: Central Park Arrest I've played Central Park Arrest to musica, for those who may be interested to hear it. It's a cute tune, all right, although to me it doesn't have the upfront urgency of a great girlgroup record - perhaps it needs some dynamic compression? My copy is from a casette dub, but it doesn't sound too bad. jack -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2002 17:20:09 +0000 From: richard hattersley Subject: No B.Wilson in chart I was surprised Brian Wilsons new Pet Sounds live CD didn't chart this week in the UK with all the promotion he has had with the tour and Queen's concert. What a shame. Perhaps he'll do better stateside. Richard Hattersley -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2002 19:41:36 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: DAVE GODIN vs MICK JAGGER Hi, I just received the following message via email from my chum DAVE (Deep Soul) GODIN. I have my own opinions on the subject of the forthcoming knighthood of MICK JAGGER, which may or may not be the same as those held by Dave. What are the views of the inhabitants of planet Spectropop, I wonder? > Have just heard that it is likely that Mick Jagger is to be > made a "knight" in the next honours list. If this is so, > then the least Her Majesty could do would be to make Bo > Diddley, Chuck Berry and (posthumously) Muddy Waters, > Companions of Honour. > > No doubt Jagger's citation will read, "For services in > helping prevent American 'race' music from making too many > potentially troublesome inroads in the United Kingdom amongst > disaffected youth, and for deflecting and helping contain > efforts for real radical change in British society, by > selflessly ignoring his own middle-class status by pretending > to be a working-class rebel. For these and other services to > the status quo, we duly honour him". (Dave Godin) MICK PATRICK -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2002 20:32:22 +0100 From: simon white Subject: Re: DAVE GODIN vs MICK JAGGER Whereas Mr Godin holds a unique place in the history of R'n'B in the U.K. and his contribution to its promotion is invaluable, his posting suggests to me that its time for him to "get over it"! Funnily enough I was reading through Blues and Soul magazines from the mid seventies last night and his message was the same then. The kind of inverse racism/classism that Mr Godin is STILL sticking to comes across as a bit 'chip on the shoulder'. And as I suspect Dave is a dyed in the wool old school working-class socialist, why does he care about knighthoods anyway? They mean nothing. Whether he likes it or not, the likes of The Stones probably turned more people ON to black R'n'B than off it. And Bo Diddley, Chuck Berry and Muddy Walters all come from the 'guitar' end of R'n'B so beloved of the white rock press and so arguably these three artists all benefited from the indirect promotion given to them by the cover version of the time. It's very naive to assume that the little girls [and boys!] would have bought Muddy Waters over Mick Jagger - Mick's a bit prettier [no offence to Muddy!]. The first two records I bought [apart from Pinky and Perky and Uncle Mac of course] were The Stones' version of "Little Red Rooster" and The Animals' "Outcast" [which I honestly didn't know until about two years ago was a cover of Eddie and Ernie]. Before that it was Little Richard from my parents' record collection. I have no interest in The Rolling Stones today whatsoever. The love of real R'n'B stayed with me ever since. Tell Dave to stick with the music! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2002 20:31:55 -0000 From: Mike Edwards Subject: Re: Dave Godin vs Mick Jagger Mick Patrick writes "I just received the following message via email from my chum DAVE (Deep Soul) GODIN. I have my own opinions on the subject of the forthcoming knighthood of MICK JAGGER, which may or may not be the same as those held by Dave. What are the views of the inhabitants of planet Spectropop, I wonder? " I just finished reading Nadine Cohodas' book, Spinning Blues into Gold: The Chess Brothers and the Legendary Chess Records, in which there is an underlying theme that Chess Records in the US ripped off the very same artists. I remember reading a comment by UK Soul DJ Mike Raven that Rock is a sex trip. The argument ran that if Mick Jagger sang Let's Spend The Night Together it would dovetail perfectly with fantasies of white teens which would not be the case if Howlin Wolf sang the same song. Is this fair? Maybe not but such is the way of the world. I take comfort in the fact that the black artists named by Dave Godin enjoy (or did enjoy) successful careers and that exposure to a very large audience was made possible by the likes of Leonard Chess and Mick Jagger. The Stones and the Beatles relied on cover versions of US R&B songs for no more than the first two years of their careers and then moved on. Those that could not, such as the Searchers, perished and their careers were long outlived by Black American R&B singers. Who would you want to see tonight Chuck Berry or the "New" Searchers? As for Mick Jagger "selflessly ignoring his own middle-class status by pretending to be a working-class rebel", I came from the working class and became a middle class rebel but I'm not sure that makes me a better person. Mike Edwards -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2002 21:05:25 +0100 From: The Spectropop Team Subject: New At Spectropop ADMIN NOTE We are pleased to announce our new SPECTROPOP RECOMMENDS section, dedicated to new media releases: books, CD's, videos etc., which is inaugurated with a small feature on an incredible CD by top Motown girl group THE VELVELETTES. Click below to be transported directly to the page: http://www.spectropop.com/recommends/recommends.html ENJOY! THE SPECTROPOP TEAM -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2002 20:57:36 -0000 From: Bret Wheadon Subject: Re: No B.Wilson in chart Richard Hattersley wrote: > I was surprised Brian Wilsons new Pet Sounds live CD didn't > chart this week Has the CD been out long enough to chart? It doesn't surprise me much; for all of the publicity he's been getting from the concerts, I think Brian Wilson is seen nowadays as more of a rock casualty than rock royalty, along the lines of Sir Paul. And I'm not sure that another live document (following closely on the heels of his "Roxy" discs) is what the public is salivating for... I doubt the disc will do any better here in the States, although it has risen as high as #16 on Amazon.com, and personally, I LOVE IT! Bret W. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2002 21:13:32 +0100 From: David Bell Subject: the sequins I'd like to return to the thread of a couple of weeks ago, when "same name but different groups" was discussed. I've recently bought three 45s by the Sequins, which I think are sung by different girls. First is the group on A&M with "I'll Be Satisfied", next the group on Goldstar with "Hey Romeo" and finally the gals on Renfro with "He's A Flirt". I'd be grateful is anyone could confirm which group is which and whether there are any famous members lurking among them. David B. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2002 20:52:15 -0000 From: Bret Wheadon Subject: New 'Motown salutes Bacharach' CD Just saw this on Amazon.co.uk: http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0000647GU A fairly intriguing lineup of songs... Bret -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2002 22:16:08 +0100 From: Richard Havers Subject: Re: DAVE GODIN vs MICK JAGGER Dave Godin (via Mick Patrick) wrote: > No doubt Jagger's citation will read, "For services in helping prevent > American 'race' music from making too many potentially troublesome > inroads in the United Kingdom amongst disaffected youth, and for > deflecting and helping contain efforts for real radical change in > British society, by selflessly ignoring his own middle-class status by > pretending to be a working-class rebel. It makes no sense to put forward an argument that American 'race' music would somehow have forced a sea change in British society. I think we need to lighten up here Dave and see the music for what it is. We need to view it from the perspective of Muddy, and others of his background, generation, colour, and socio-economic standing. Their music was to be enjoyed and was a vehicle by which they earned a living. Not for one moment did Muddy, Buddy, BB, Slim, Jimmy, Elmore or the Wolf ever expect their music to effect political change 3000 miles from 2120 Michigan Avenue or any other US studio. And as for Mick, or Keith, Brian, Charlie and Bill, helping to prevent any troublesome inroads......... "I'm really glad someone from the Rolling Stones is here. I love them very much. If it wasn't for the Stones, none of the white kids in the States would have heard of Muddy Waters, B.B.King or any of 'em. Nobody knew my music in the States till they played it" So said Muddy at London's Hampstead Country Club in November 1970. Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2002 22:38:10 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: DOROTHY LOVE COATES Hi, The transformation of Gospel compositions into hit records on the secular charts has been a pet topic of mine for some time. Take, for example, the song "That's Enough", a hit for Ray Chales in 1959, and again for Roscoe Robinson seven years later. Then there's "Ninety-Nine And A Half (Won't Do)", a hit for Wilson Pickett in 1966. The connection? Each of these was written and originally recorded by gospel legend DOROTHY LOVE COATES. Her song "(You Can't Hurry God) He's Right On Time" was plundered by Holland/Dozier/Holland and turned into "You Can't Hurry Love", a #1 for the Supremes in 1966. Interestingly, it was Dorothy after whom Phil Spector renamed Darlene Love (nee Wright) in 1963. Miss Wright and Mr Spector were both fans of hers. Dorothy Love Coates died on April 9th aged 74. MICK PATRICK (For the record, an atheist) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2002 07:03:14 +0930 From: Norman Subject: Re: DAVE GODIN vs MICK JAGGER Re: Dave Godin (as cited by Mick Patrick): > No doubt Jagger's citation will read, "For services in > helping prevent American 'race' music from making too many > potentially troublesome inroads in the United Kingdom amongst > disaffected youth, and for deflecting and helping contain > efforts for real radical change in British society, by > selflessly ignoring his own middle-class status by pretending > to be a working-class rebel. For these and other services to > the status quo, we duly honour him". (Dave Godin) So bloody succinct. Dead right! My late father had a theory on how Knighthoods are given in entertainment. But in these politically correct times I can't expand. Serious Note: Ivor Novello missed out on a Knighthood because he was convicted for a breach of the law on petrol rationing during WW2. Maybe if Ivor Novello had been charged for consuming the total pharmaceutical output of Europe he may have been Knighted. (abridged for the politically correct). Another serious note: About the concert they had for the (British) Queen. Music Hall was tidied up from being a vulgar 'working-class' past-time by the introduction of the Royal Command Performance. Although capitalism had co-opted the rock'n'roll genre at an early stage I suppose it still needed a Royal Stamp of approval especially in these neo-jingoistic days. As for the first Royal Command Performance, Marie Lloyd was not invited and I believe she organised the Peoples Command Performance as a rebuke to the rebuke. Norman -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Wed, 12 Jun 2002 23:07:16 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: THE SEQUINS Original Message From David Bell: > I'd like to return to the thread of a couple of weeks ago, when > "same name but different groups" was discussed. I've recently > bought three 45s by the Sequins, which I think are sung by different > girls. First is the group on A&M with "I'll Be Satisfied", next > the group on Goldstar with "Hey Romeo" and finally the gals on > Renfro with "He's A Flirt". > > I'd be grateful is anyone could confirm which group is which and > whether there are any famous members lurking among them. Sir is correct in his assumption that there were numerous groups named THE SEQUINS. For example, in 1962/1963 a New York-based group (or groups) using that monicker recorded for Ascot, United Artists and Terrace. Some very good records were the result. Then there were the Motor City girls who waxed for Detroit Sound and Renfro circa 1966. These appeal to "northern" fans, whatever that means :-) The most famous Sequins were the Chicago trio who hit the Soul charts with "Hey Romeo" on the Gold Star label in 1970. They went on to record for their producer Denise LaSalle's Crajon logo and Fantasy. You can read all about them in Robert Pruter's wonderful book "Chicago Soul" (University Of Illinois Press). You have this book, yes? According to another of my favourite tomes, "L.A. R&B Vocal Groups" by Steve Propes & Galen Gart (Big Nickel Publications), the Sequins who recorded for the A & M label were the very same four girls who previously made a bit of noise as THE RIBBONS. That particular group comprised EVELYN DOTY, ARTHETTA GIBSON, LOVIE (surname unknown) and VESSIE SIMMONS. Vessie, who went on to work with Ike & Tina Turner and led her own group of Ikettes for a while, is interviewed in the Propes/Gart book. I wonder if she figures in Tina's autobiography? Discography (attempt): The Ribbons "Ain't Gonna Kiss Ya"/"My Baby Said" Marsh 202, 1962 The Ribbons "After Last Night"/"This Is Our Melody" Marsh 203, 1963 The Ribbons "Melody D'Amour"/"They Played A Sad Song" Parkway 912, 1964 Evelyn Doty & the Ribbons "Teach Me How To Dance"/"I'd Like To Be" Gramo 107 The Sequins "I'll Be Satisfied"/"Who Says You Can't Jerk..." A & M 761, 1965 The Sandpapers "Ain't Gonna Kiss Ya"/"My Baby Said" Charger 114, 1965 Vessie Simmons "Dedicated To The One I Love"/"Hold On To A Love Song" Simco Vessie Simmons "I Can Make It On My Own"/"Pt 2" Simco, c.1980 Charger 114 was a reissue of Marsh 202 with the group name changed go figure! "Ain't Gonna Kiss Ya", a #81 hit on Billboard in early 1963 but a much bigger hit in the Los Angeles area, was composed by James Marcus Smith, aka P.J. Proby. The record was the object of a very hasty, and rather fine, West Coast cover version by Suzie Clark on the Rendezvous label. The song was also rendered for the UK market by Simone Jackson (Piccadilly), Jean Martin (Decca) and, most famously, the Searchers (Pye). "After Last Night", another Proby song, was first cut by the Chiffons on Reprise (not the "He's So Fine" gals, the Los Angeles lot). Jackie DeShannon did a good version too (Liberty), as did the Rev-Lons (also Reprise). Both of the Ribbons' Marsh 45s were produced by former Teddy Bear, and old Phil Spector chum, Marshall Leib. "Ain't Gonna Kiss Ya" by the Ribbons can be found on the CD "Golden Age Of American Rock'n'Roll, Volume 5" (Ace CDCHD 600), the Suzie Clark version is available on "Early Girls, Volume 3" (Ace CDCHD 775), the Simone Jackson rendition is included on "Girls Don't Come" (Sequel NEECD 327) and the Searchers' is out on "Sweets For My Sweet" (Sequel CMRCD 155). The Chiffons' and the Rev-Lons' versions of "After Last Night" are both featured on one of the best ever, and tuffest to locate, girl group CDs, "Pixie Girls" (Japanese Warner Bros WPCP-3540). One more thing. If you ask me, the Ribbons probably recorded under further pseudonyms, such as THE BUTTONS & BEAUS. Ribbons, Sequins, Buttons, Bows (sic) - geddit? One side of that group's fabulous Marshall Leib-produced Bob B. Soxx-style 45 on Zen was written by one Vessie Truitt. I suspect she might prove to be Ms. Simmons by another name. I dunno 'bout you, David, but that information rush has right worn me out. In fact, I'm thinking of getting one of my (((((HEADS))))) :-[ MICK PATRICK -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2002 07:26:46 -0400 From: Vlaovic B Subject: Polly Brown! Norman: >"Up In A Puff of Smoke" would have to had been one of the first >GTO releases. Vince: > I know that somewhere in my vinyl collection I have a 12" single > of her follow up to Smoke and remember it wasn't a hit, but I > played it anyhow...did they ever do an album with her ? There is a 20-odd track compilation on her by RPM records entitled 'Bewitched: The Polly Brown Story'. Not entirely great, but lots of good tracks and of course 'Up In a Puff' is classic British Pop-Bubblegum Soul (of which I guess Pearls' "Guilty" is another good example). She sounds uncannily like Dionne Warwick in places, especially her early Pickittywitch singles which of course were constructed to sound like Warwick tracks, all the while denying that she'd ever heard of Dionne. I also notice that there's a twofer of some old Pickittywitch LPs, on what label I can't say. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2002 19:06:52 +0100 From: Peter Richmond Subject: Polly Brown Norman writes; >"Up In A Puff of Smoke" would have to had been one of the first >GTO releases. When Polly Brown was with 'Pickettywitch' I think >I recall she was a brunette. Then as the disco lady she turned >blonde. Not a bad metamorphisis into one of the most remembered >disco ladies of the time. Then again the British seem to have a >knack of coming up with surprises. They can take a current style >and almost re-invent as their own. On the same day that she recorded "Up In A Puff Of Smoke", Polly Brown also recorded a cover of Abba's "Honey Honey" in a duet with Ron Roker which was released as by Sweet Dreams on Bradley 7408, reaching #10 in the UK charts in July 1974 and #68 in the US charts on ABC 12008. But it was her appearance on Top Of The Pops which caused a great stir because she wore a black wig and 'blacked' her face up. Black singer Tony Jackson was used for the TV appearances and publicity photos plus he subsequently recorded with Polly Brown as Sweet Dreams. During her time with Ron Roker and Gerry Shury, she also recorded a version of "Amoureuse", months before Kiki Dee's version, but stalling on the release meant that Kiki Dee's version was released first and, of course, became a hit. Polly Browne (the 'e' was added to her surname) compiled a great album covering her career in 1995, "Bewitched - The Polly Browne Story" on RPM 143, she also wrote the extensive liner notes. I bought my copy directly from RPM from their website www.rpmrecords.co.uk/ Full track listing; That Same Old Feeling - Pickettywitch Sad Old Kinda Movie - Pickettywitch Days I Remember - Pickettywitch Baby I Wont Let You Down - Pickettywitch To Love Somebody - Polly Brown Wild Night - Polly Brown Writing You A Letter - Polly Browne Honey Honey - Sweet Dreams Lets Get Into Something - Sweet Dreams Best Of Everything - Sweet Dreams Amoureuse - Polly Brown Up In Puff Of Smoke - Polly Brown Love Bug - Polly Brown He Aint As Black As He's Painted - Polly Brown Never Dared To Love - Polly Browne Dance Little Lady Dance - Polly Brown Do You Believe In Love At First Sight - Polly Brown Mama - Polly Browne It's Me That Youre Leaving - Polly Browne Angel - Polly Browne Precious To Me - Polly Browne Believe In Me - Polly Browne Bewitched - Polly Browne Peter Richmond Righteous Brothers Discography http://freespace.virgin.net/p.richmond/ -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Tue, 11 Jun 2002 20:22:05 -0400 From: james botticelli Subject: Ain't Gonna Kiss Ya Mick Patrick wrote: > One more thing. If you ask me, the Ribbons probably recorded under further > pseudonyms, such as THE BUTTONS & BEAUS. Ribbons, Sequins, Buttons, Bows > (sic) - geddit? One side of that group's fabulous Marshall Leib-produced > Bob B. Soxx-style 45 on Zen was written by one Vessie Truitt. I suspect > she might prove to be Ms. Simmons by another name. The Ribbons' "Ain't Gonna Kiss Ya" was a real surprise to me when I found the single (on an obscure reissue label :-( ) back in the early 8Ts. I'd always favored the Searchers' cover of it on the US Needles & Pinza LP. One thing I never got over about this rekkid, was the way the drummer suddenly doubles the tempo during the chorus: the singer croons "Ain't Gonna Kiss Ya No Mo' No Mo' (drums now double) Ain't Gonna Tell Ya I'm Yours Fo Sho'"... And those drums just keep on keepin' on at double tempo for no apparent reason. Go figure! Jimmy Botticelli Taking The E-Z...Way Out! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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