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Spectropop - Digest Number 2198



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 23 messages in this issue.


Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Shindig vs. Hullabaloo
           From: Regina Litman 
      2. "Eefin' Alvin"
           From: Jennifer Sharpe 
      3. Re: Playmates on ABC Paramount
           From: Ashley Wells 
      4. Re: Joanie Sommers
           From: Tom Taber 
      5. HB ND
           From: Phil X Milstein 
      6. Re: cycle sounds
           From: Brian 
      7. Re: Canterbury
           From: Brian 
      8. Re: Hullabaloo
           From: Tony 
      9. Ellie Greenwich Remembers Steve Tudanger
           From: S'pop Projects 
     10. Joe Jones, R.I.P.
           From: S'pop Projects 
     11. John Krondes & the Jordanaires
           From: Paul Levinson 
     12. Re: Neil Diamond
           From: Regina Litman 
     13. Lulu, Mike DesBarres, Adrienne Posta and----Chitra Neogy??????
           From: Tony Leong 
     14. Brass band UK Spector cover
           From: Mark Maldwyn 
     15. Shindig, Hallabaloo etc
           From: Paul Urbahns 
     16. Re: Shindig v. Hullabaloo
           From: Steve 
     17. Re: Shindig vs. Hullabaloo
           From: Chris 
     18. Brute Force in New York
           From: Paul Levinson 
     19. Re: James Ray & George Harrison
           From: Einar Einarsson Kvaran 
     20. Re: Shindig v. Hullabaloo
           From: Tony Leong 
     21. I Can't Wait Until I See My Baby's Face
           From: Richard Williams 
     22. Vibrations > Playmates post-Roulette
           From: Country Paul 
     23. Re: Playmates on ABC Paramount
           From: Artie Wayne 


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________________________________________________________________________ Message: 1 Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 03:04:52 -0000 From: Regina Litman Subject: Re: Shindig vs. Hullabaloo Phil X Milstein wrote: > Compare these standards to those of Hullabaloo, where: > * dancers had feature status At least one "Shindig" dancer became a featured performer - a girl or young woman named Carol who wore big glasses that made her stand out from the rest. I remember reading in a magazine article at the time that Carol hadn't been wearing glasses (either she had perfect vision or wore contacts), but someone in a position of authority on the show suggested that she wear them to see what the audience reaction would be. And it worked because she became instantly recognizable because of them. > * choreography was insipid As a 12-13-year-old, it didn't matter to me. > * hosts were established middle-of-the-road stars, or younger > stars hoping to break into MOR roles (Shindig adopted a similar > policy after Jack Good left) I loved both "Hullabaloo" and "Shindig", but one of the attractions of "Hullabaloo" for me was the guest host. > * forced acts to engage in hokey medley of current Top 5 hits One of my favorite "Hullabaloo" memories is of Herman (Peter Noone) and Freddie (of Freddie and the Dreamers) singing that song from "Mary Poppins" with the long title - "Supercalifragilistic, etc". > I bring up Hullabaloo's many shortcomings to indicate just how > exciting (despite their reliance on lip-syncing) Shindig and > Shivaree could be. Things really moved on the latter two shows, > and clips from them are almost always a solid treat to watch. I watched a couple of "Shindig" shows at the Museum of Television and Radio in New York this past August. They only have about four in their immediately-available collection, but maybe the branch in L.A. has some more, and maybe there are more in the parts of the collection that are not kept immediately available to walk-in guests. What I noticed from the "Shindig" shows that I watched was the fast- paced action. I also wondered if a whole "Shindig" show was done at once or if these were clips filmed at different times and then put together to make a half hour show. (One more "Hullabaloo" difference - I think it was an hour long, compared to "Shindig"'s 30 minutes. But there was a time when "Shindig" aired twice a week. Also, I believe that "Shindig" went through the summer of 1965 with all new episodes, while "Hullabaloo" went to reruns - and was also aired, at least in Washington, at 10:00, which was past my bedtime even in the summer. The night that Herman/Freddie duet rerun aired, I was already in my parents' doghouse for some transgression earlier that day, and it didn't make things better for me when I was caught trying to sneak a peek at this show when I should have been in bed. Tuesday, August 3, 1965.) I also noticed this quick scene-changing in a "Where the Action Is" episode I watched at the same museum a few years ago. (At the time, this was the only "Action" episode they had there.) The "Action" episode disabused me of the notion that the only places they ever went on location were in Southern California. In the show I watched, they had Bobby Vee, native of the upper midwest, performing in Minnesota, and the Four Seasons, natives of the New Jersey suburbs of New York City, performing in Brooklyn, if I recall correctly. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 04:16:32 -0000 From: Jennifer Sharpe Subject: "Eefin' Alvin" I am researching the rhythmic wheezing artform, particular to hillbillies, known as "eefing" or "hoodling." Although I've gathered a pretty comprehensive collection of eefing recordings, I am still looking for a copy of The Chipmunks' contribution to the genre, "Eefin' Alvin." Does anyone out there have a copy of this? Any interesting anecdotes about eefing, its history, or its maestro, Jimmy Riddle, would also be most welcome. Thanks! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 18:45:45 +1100 From: Ashley Wells Subject: Re: Playmates on ABC Paramount Furthermore to The Playmates, "I Cross My Fingers" and "She Never Looked Better", both on ABC Paramount from 1963, are FANTASTIC. Although more known as a novelty act, much of their material was of great teen sound in its own right. Their ABC Paramount material seems to be overlooked, but even many of their Roulette releases were great also. They had four releases on ABC Paramount between 1963 and 1965. Here are the details of their two best of those: "She Never Looked Better" Written by Paul Vance and Leon Carr; arranged by Alan Lorber. "I Cross My Fingers" Written by W. Kent & W. Farrar, arranged by Sid Feller. As you can tell from the songwriters and arrangers, that's why they are great songs! I'd like to know if any of you don't know these two songs. One is a fantastic uptempo teener and the other is a stirring doo wop style teen ballad. Later, Ash -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 08:56:28 -0800 (PST) From: Tom Taber Subject: Re: Joanie Sommers Bill Mulvy wrote: > The Joanie Sommers clip of "Don't Pity Me" on one of the > Hullabaloo DVDs is a live rendition that differs considerably > from the studio version. It is a dynamite rendition and she > has quite a pair of eyes. Miss Sommers is scheduled to make a special appearance at a show on Jan. 28 at the Palace Theatre in Lockport, NY (15 miles NE of Buffalo). They've been advertising it on KB 1520. As many people mourn the loss of "oldies" radio, and with today's tight playlists, let me report that a few weeks back KB played three songs in a row that I couldn't identify, except that one was by Sam Cooke! Tom Taber -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 11:28:43 -0500 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: HB ND I was looking through an excellent Neil Diamond fansite this morning, at http://iaisnd.com, and learned that not only is Neil an expert fencer, that he auditioned for the lead role in the movie version of "Lenny," and that he was raised in part in Cheyenne, Wyoming, but also that today is his 65th birthday. To which I can only add, Soolaimon, --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 13:27:59 -0500 From: Brian Subject: Re: cycle sounds previously: > Mind you, Brooks doesn't actually say that Joe rode his > bike into the studio itself, which does seem a little unlikely, > not to say unsafe. There were tons of hot rod and motorcycle sound effects albums in the '60s. Also, some of the better engineers in Hollywood went out on hire with a Nagra or some field recording device to capture those sounds. Davie Allan/Mike Curb featured them on tons of Arrows recordings from 1965-66, and the Dave Myers Effects cut a genius album of psychedelic instrumental guitar with "drag" and "cycle" effects in 1967. Brian -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 13:31:35 -0500 From: Brian Subject: Re: Canterbury Brian Chidester wrote: > In Pasadena you have Poo-Bah Records and Canterbury Records, > both great stores. Country Paul asked: > Is the latter any relation to the Canterbury Records label? No. I actually asked them the same question. What I was told is that Canterbury Records, in Pasadena, was a jazz and folk store opened in 1959. And with those high-minded aspirations, I suppose naming their shop after a literary classic like the "Canterbury Tales" was not out of line. But the owner now, Russell, did not even know there was a record label named Canterbury in the '60s. Brian -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 19:22:08 -0000 From: Tony Subject: Re: Hullabaloo Bill Mulvy wrote: > The Joanie Sommers clip of "Don't Pity Me" on one of the > Hullabaloo DVDs is a live rendition that differs considerably > from the studio version. It is a dynamite rendition and she > has quite a pair of eyes. Although most of the Hullabaloo guests sang vocals live over the record, the live vocal sounded much more interesting than the recorded versions! I too noticed that when Joanie Sommers sang "Don't Pity Me" (followed by the great Supremes doing "Back In My Arms Again", with Flo drowning out the others). The other good example I can think of is Dusty Springfield singing "Some Of Your Lovin". I prefer THAT version over the released record. Singing into those overhead mikes really made the singers project and sound raw. On the other hand, Shindig was much more of a treat because the live vocals and re-recorded (and often sped up and punchier backing tracks) made everything more exciting. Tony -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 00:33:52 -0000 From: S'pop Projects Subject: Ellie Greenwich Remembers Steve Tudanger New at S'pop Ellie Greenwich has penned for us a lovely tribute to her late friend Steve Tudanger. Clearly, Tudie was a great guy who will be sorely missed by all who knew him. Tudie - Steve Tudanger Remembered, by Ellie Greenwich: http://www.spectropop.com/SteveTudanger/index.htm R.I.P. The S'pop Team -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 00:41:41 -0000 From: S'pop Projects Subject: Joe Jones, R.I.P. Dear Members, As reported previously, Joe Jones, of "You Talk Too Much" fame, passed away last November. An obituary has been added to the S'pop Remembers section. Please take the time to read it: http://www.spectropop.com/remembers/JoeJones.htm R.I.P. The S'pop Team -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 04:55:10 -0000 From: Paul Levinson Subject: John Krondes & the Jordanaires Been a good week for music . .. Just got back from The Electric Lady - Jimi Hendrix's recording studio on 8th Street in the Village (NYC) - where John Krondes was finishing up a great new recording of "Baby I Love You" with the Jordanaires (they had put in their harmony beforehand). Yes, Elvis' fabled background group. They're in their 70s now, but as John said to me, they still sound as if they're in their 20s or younger. (The song, "Baby I Love You, " was the Ronettes' hit written by Ellie Greenwich, Jeff Barry, and Phil Spector - later recorded by Andy Kim. It's always been one of my all-time favorites. ) The Sweet Inspirations, Elvis' girl background group, are on this new recording too, with famous sidemen on just about every instrument. .. So, what I was doing there? Well. .. . John's father the late Jim Krondes and I had written some songs in the late 1960s (Jim the music, I the lyrics - songs like "Snow Flurries," "Teardrops Make No Sound," "The Winds of Change" ). Don't worry, you likely never heard of them, but who knows, you may someday not too far away. .. John and I met one or two times, years ago, in Jim's recording studio. John was just a kid then. Now he's burning up the charts with "Indiana Girl," a new song he wrote. The mix I heard of "Baby I Love You" was great - 72 tracks of Spectropopping rock 'n' roll! The Jordanaires sound maybe better than they did in the 1950s. Whew . .. rock 'n' roll, not only does it never die, it's some kind of fountain of youth. John and Elvis' singers and musicians have recorded more than 30 tracks... enough for a few CDs . .. Stay tuned. All best, Paul www.sff.net/people/paullevinson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 23:29:10 -0000 From: Regina Litman Subject: Re: Neil Diamond Mike Edwards wrote: > But talking of the Solitaires, they recorded a Neil Diamond > song for MGM in 1964, "Fool That I Am". This and other early > 60s' Neil Diamond compositions are nicely detailed at: > http://iaisnd.com/biography.cfm?id=` Neil wrote Billy > Fury's "Where Do You Run?"? I didn't know that. Depending on > your taste, the list shows a number of Neil Diamond pre- > "Solitary Man" titles that are as good as anything he ever > recorded subsequently. The following is a more direct link to the menu page for the list of songs: http://iaisnd.com/songs.cfm?id==stats&?pageid=4 By the way, Neil hit the big 6-5 today, as did Aaron Neville. Today is also Ray Stevens' birthday. I've seen various years given for his birth, including 1941. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 19:27:44 -0000 From: Tony Leong Subject: Lulu, Mike DesBarres, Adrienne Posta and----Chitra Neogy?????? Hi group: The names I mentioned were all actors in the movie "To Sir With Love". Lulu, Michael, and Adrienne all also recorded during the '60's and beyond, but there is listed a song "Perfumed Garden" by Chitra Neogy cut about 1967. Does anyone own it?? Could someone download it here if you do?? Chitra spoke no lines in the movie, but she appeared in LOTS of scenes--she was the Indian/SouthAsian woman in the movie. Apparently, she is still very much involved in the arts here in New York, and I'd love to hear her song(s). Tony Leong -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 20:25:50 -0000 From: Mark Maldwyn Subject: Brass band UK Spector cover Further to the 2 dynamic duo's version of "I Love How You Love Me" with bagpipes, I feel there is a British Spector cover which has a brass band backing. Anyone know of one...? Mark Maldwyn -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 19:17:58 -0500 From: Paul Urbahns Subject: Shindig, Hallabaloo etc Phil X Milstein wrote: > I bring up Hullabaloo's many shortcomings to indicate just > how exciting (despite their reliance on lip-syncing) > Shindig and Shivaree could be Actually most of the excerpts that I have seen (and from what I remember) Shindig rarely ever lip synced. The Blossoms and The Wellingtons sang background vocals when needed for the guests. I have the Hullabaloo DVDs and the show as not up to Shindig standards, used alot of lip syncing and silly dance numbers. The DVD's did not redub the audio so the sound quality is vary variable depending on source. Rhino issued some VHS comps made from the Shindig shows which were good quality, so I have been hoping they would issue whole shows like on the Hullabaloo DVDs, but nothing on the market yet. I would imagine Jimmy O'Neil, the DJ that was the host, would still be around and could do some new intros, like Dave Clark (of the Dave Clark Five) did on the Ready Steady Go series. Paul Urbahns Radcliff, KY -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 09:43:06 EST From: Steve Subject: Re: Shindig v. Hullabaloo I remember watching both Shindig & Hullabaloo each week. I also have the Hulabaloo DVDs & the Shindig video tapes. Shindig was shot on film and geared for teens. Everyone sang live and the show moved fast. Hullabaloo was taped. I once attended a taping at NBC studios in New York. Some acts on Hullabaloo sang live, some lip-synced, and some sang live to their original track. They had guest hosts like Sammy Davis Jr., Jerry Lewis, etc. to try to draw in the mainstream viewers. The show also had mainstream production values, like guests singing medleys of the top hits of the day. About 10 years ago VH1 aired a special about Shindig with interviews with host Jimmy O'Neill, show regular Bobby Sherman, and lots of clips from the show. I don't know if it's available anywhere, however. Steve -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 08:07:46 -0000 From: Chris Subject: Re: Shindig vs. Hullabaloo Regina Litman wrote: > At least one "Shindig" dancer became a featured performer - > a young woman named Carol who wore big glasses that made > her stand out from the rest. That was Carole Shelyne - "The Girl With The Horn-Rimmed Glasses", whose career lasted about as long as Piccola Pupa's. Carole also appeared (with her glasses) in the movie "Out Of Sight". - Chris -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 05:08:58 -0000 From: Paul Levinson Subject: Brute Force in New York This past Sunday night, it was the Rockwood Music Hall on Allen Street in NYC - a cozy little place (notwithstanding its name) where Tina and I joined Stu Nitekman & Kathy Flaherty to hear Brute Force do a set from 10 to 11pm. Background: Stu (also known as Jonathan Hatch) and I recorded a song of Brute's (also known as Steve Friedland) called "No Olympian Height" back in 1968 for Atlantic Records. We were known as "The Other Voices" then, and produced by Ellie Greenwich and Mike Rashkow. Spectropoppers may recall that the B-side of "No Olympian Height" -- "Hung Up Love," written by Mikie Harris and me -- was included on Rhino's 2004 "Come The Sunshine" compilation, which, by the way, was recently reissued in the U.K. as "A Whole Lot Of Rainbows". It was great to hear Brute sing "No Olympian" after lo these many years, and fun to do a little harmonizing from our table. (Steve Friedland, of course, was part of The Tokens, and also wrote for them.) Guy Davis -- son of Ossie Davis -- followed with some fine blues songs. Brute sang a spirited science fiction song titled "Space Mission," and was kind enough to mention my novel "Plot To Save Socrates" from the stage. Stu and Kathy have also written some good science fiction songs. (There has always been a strong connection, in my mind, between science fiction and rock 'n' roll -- they both had their first golden ages at the same time, in the 1950s, after all.) Brute will be at the CB Gallery in NYC this Friday at 11pm. I'll very likely be in the audience again. All best, Paul www.sff.net/people/paullevinson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 19:03:29 -0800 (PST) From: Einar Einarsson Kvaran Subject: Re: James Ray & George Harrison John Fox wrote: > For those interested in how George Harrison came to know > James Ray's "I've Got My Mind Set On You", please check > out the book "Before He Was Fab". As I recall the story, Harrison was in the studio. Jim Keltner started messing around with the beat and GH said, "That sounds like 'Got My Mind Set On You' -- the Beatles used to play it back then." So they tried it, and the rest is #1 history. Einar -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 18:27:19 -0000 From: Tony Leong Subject: Re: Shindig v. Hullabaloo Steve Dworkin: > About 10 years ago VH1 aired a special about Shindig with > interviews with host Jimmy O'Neill, show regular Bobby > Sherman, and lots of clips from the show. I don't know if > it's available anywhere, however. Steve, that VH1 Special was only aired at the time to coincide with the release of the videos. The special itself was never comercially released, though I taped it back then!! The special was great with 1992 interviews with Donna Loren, Ray Pohlman,Doug Sahm, Turtles, and even some of the dancers (Maria, Anita Mann) and others. I recall frowning at some of the interviews like Lesley Gore claiming she was somewhat rebellious, Rick Derringer claiming the McCoys looked somewhat like the Beatles, and Donna Loren calling Aretha Franklin a "newcomer"!!!!! Tony Leong -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 16:15:04 +0000 From: Richard Williams Subject: I Can't Wait Until I See My Baby's Face This is a song that seems to draw the best from everyone who performs it, but there is an absolutely devastating version by Dionne Warwick, produced and arranged (as well as co- composed) by the great Jerry Ragovoy, on her 1975 album Then Came You. (The title track, the hit duet with the (Detroit) Spinners, was produced by the even greater Thom Bell; the rest is all Ragovoy's.) Richard Williams -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Tue, 24 Jan 2006 23:54:34 -0600 (CST) From: Country Paul Subject: Vibrations > Playmates post-Roulette Me, earlier: > "The Vibrations (a.k.a. the Jayhawks) recorded a new > version of this song which later became a minor hit in > 1961 (peaking at only #117)." ... Anyone know if this > is the hitmaking Vibrations or a coincidental name? Rob: > It's the same Vibrations that had hits in the '60s, but > with minor lineup changes. See http://tinyurl.com/ajkxq . Thanks, Rob. Marv Goldberg's articles are always fascinating and certainly loaded with detail. Ash re: the Playmates: > ...I also love their releases on ABC Paramount. I can > mention more details if people don't know their ABC > Paramount Sides. I thought their recorded output was exclusively on Roulette. Please get into the details.... Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Wed, 25 Jan 2006 05:24:19 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Playmates on ABC Paramount Ash...How ya'doin'? I was one of the writers of the Playmates records you mentioned, "I Cross my Fingers", under my real name Wayne Kent. Could you play it to Musica? Thanks and regards, Artie Wayne http://artiewayne.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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