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Spectropop - Digest Number 2153



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 23 messages in this issue.


Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Louise Cordet
           From: Mick Patrick 
      2. Diane Ray
           From: Ronnie Allen 
      3. Re: Joe South & Bob Dylan
           From: John DeAngelis 
      4. Re: Viva
           From: Phil X Milstein 
      5. Re: Christmas is the time to be with The Orchids
           From: Scott Swanson 
      6. Re: The Isley Brothers
           From: Hans Huss 
      7. Re: Louise Cordet
           From: Michael Robson" 
      8. Re: Kim Fowley
           From: Martin Roberts 
      9. Re: Joe South "The Purple People Eater Meets The Witch Doctor"
           From: Tom Taber 
     10. Re: Joe South and Dennis St. John
           From: Regina Litman 
     11. Re: Christmas is the time to be with the Orchids
           From: John DeAngelis 
     12. Re: Diane Ray
           From: John Black 
     13. Re: Motown covers . . . "My Girl" by the Mamas and Papas
           From: Regina Litman 
     14. Viva Records/Music
           From: Austin Powell 
     15. Re: Diane Ray
           From: Elizabeth Curtis 
     16. Re: Joe South - "The Purple People Eater Meets the Witch Doctor"
           From: Regina Litman 
     17. Re: Kim Fowley
           From: Eddy 
     18. Re: Viva Records/Music
           From: Artie Wayne 
     19. Re: Joe South "The Purple People Eater Meets The Witch Doctor"
           From: James Botticelli 
     20. Re: Diane Ray
           From: James Botticelli 
     21. Re: Motown covers . . . good 'n' bad
           From: Mark Maldwyn 
     22. Re: Diane Ray
           From: Mark Maldwyn 
     23. Joe South
           From: Rex Patton 


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________________________________________________________________________ Message: 1 Date: Fri, 9 Dec 2005 22:44:17 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Louise Cordet Mark Maldwyn wrote: > Louise Cordet - neglected chanteuse. Did she record "Two > Lovers" in French, I wonder? Alan V Karr: > I can't tell from the French titles, but this site is a > good reference: > http://members.tripod.com/ye_ye_girls/ > http://members.tripod.com/ye_ye_girls/artists/cordet.html Anyone interested in Louise Cordet could do worse than search the S'pop Discussion Forum Archives, where you'll discover a discography and much more. Use the Spectrosearch facility at the top of the sidebar menu on the S'pop home page. Better yet, just click here: http://tinyurl.com/8x95n But no, she didn't wax "Two Lovers" in French. Shame. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Fri, 9 Dec 2005 18:36:21 EST From: Ronnie Allen Subject: Diane Ray Diane Ray is the girl who sang the Top 40 hit version of "Please Don't Talk To The Lifeguard." She is, of course, a different artist from Diane Renay, who had the hit "Navy Blue." Diane Renay has her own website (http://www.dianerenay.com) and there's plenty of information on the Internet about her. I've been able to find very little information about Diane Ray, however, other than the fact that she was born in Gastonia, North Carolina in 1942. I think her CD called "The Exciting Years" is really good. There's no great "message songs" there, but I throughly enjoy her singing and her enthusiasm. Does anyone have any additional information about Diane Ray? Does she still perform? Ronnie Allen -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Fri, 09 Dec 2005 23:28:43 -0000 From: John DeAngelis Subject: Re: Joe South & Bob Dylan Paul Oliverio wrote: > Not only was Joe South a session musician on "Blonde On Blonde," > but the original bi-fold album jacket had a photo of him. While Joe South definitely played on "Blonde On Blonde", there was/is no photo of him in the bi-fold jacket. The only people besides Dylan in those photos were actress Claudia Cardinale, an unidentified female (who contrary to some reports was definitely not Edie Sedgewick), manager Albert Grossman (the back of his head), and photographer Jerry Schatzberg, who took all of the "Blonde On Blonde" photos. John DeAngelis, NYC -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Fri, 09 Dec 2005 18:24:56 -0500 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: Viva Artie Wayne wrote: > In 1970, when I was general manager of Viva music [soon to be > bought by Warner Brothers music] ... Was Viva Music a subsid of the Viva label? If so, perhaps you can tell us some more about the label (that is, if your job brought you in contact at all with the label side). Looking over their discography now, I see lots of things I'd like to hear more about -- or better still simply hear. (And isn't it about time some enterprising reissue company comp'ed this cool and eccentric label?) Their main artist seems to have been Sonny Curtis, and, unless one is looking to break the bank with smash singles, that can never be bad. Other artists of note reflect a diverse range of styles, with The Shindogs (who had the label's debut release), Rudy Vallee, James Griffin, Spike Jones, Jr. (with a version of "Hooray For Hazel"), Prof. Irwin Corey and our own Alan O'Day among the Viva roster. Also, did they have one of the coolest label logos of them all, or what? (Which I think may've been based on the logo for Marlo Brandon's "Burn" flick.) For a pic, see BSNPubs' Viva page at http://tinyurl.com/98joh (and note the extremely rare Rolling Stones album on the right). While there I noticed an intriguing album, " A Trip Down The Sunset Strip," a '67 release by the "Leathercoated Minds," which apparently consisted of generic versions of the following songs: Eight Miles High Sunset And Clark Psychotic Reaction Over Under Sideways Down Sunshine Superman Non-Stop Arriba Kicks Mr. Tambourine Man Puff The Magic Dragon Along Comes Mary Pot Luck Is it my imagination, or does this reflect the first known attempt at a generic exploitation session based on songs with dope references? I am pretty sure it pre-dated the California Poppy Pickers release by some months. Viva Viva! --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Fri, 9 Dec 2005 15:09:39 -0800 (PST) From: Scott Swanson Subject: Re: Christmas is the time to be with The Orchids Mick Patrick wrote: > Before moving to the Roulette label in 1965 for a final > release cut with producer Teddy Randazzo, [The Orchids] > delivered two further singles on Columbia, including the > rare delight of a girl group Christmas record. Coincidentally, the "other" girl-group Orchids, the UK trio, also cut a Christmas song in 1964: "Mr. Scrooge". Well, I guess it's not technically a Christmas song, but it's about as close as you'll get for a British girl group. I got it off musica many moons ago ... perhaps someone can replay it there now? Scott -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Fri, 9 Dec 2005 14:26:29 -0800 (PST) From: Hans Huss Subject: Re: The Isley Brothers Paul Oliverio wrote: > The extraordinary thing about ["This Old Heart of Mine"] is > that it gave the Isley Brothers three distinct classics > covering, effectively, three generations: "Shout," "Twist & > Shout," and then, with Motown Magic, "This Old Heart of Mine." Even more extraordinarily, it didn't stop there. The classics kept on coming: 'It's Your Thing' (1969), 'That Lady' (1973), 'Fight The Power' (1975), 'Caravan Of Love' (1985); surely covering another generation or two... Hasse Huss -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Fri, 09 Dec 2005 23:19:39 -0000 From: Michael Robson" Subject: Re: Louise Cordet Mark Maldwyn wrote: > Louise Cordet - neglected chanteuse. Did she record "Two > Lovers" in French, I wonder? I have four LOUISE CORDET French EPs. EP (FRENCH PS) DECCA 454.089 (1962) A. SWEET ENOUGH SOMEONE ELSE'S FOOL B. I'M JUST A BABY IN A MATTER OF MOMENTS both sides of first two UK 45s. EP (FRENCH PS) DECCA 454.096 (1963) A. SHE'S GOT YOU WE KNOW WHY B. EVERYTIME CRAZY KIND OF LOVE same tracks as the UK EP. EP (FRENCH PS) DECCA 454.100 (1963) A. FAIRE LE GRAND VOYAGE QUE M'A-T-IL FAIT? B. FROM ME TO YOU L'AMOUR TOURNE EN ROND cover of Lennon/McCartney's "From Me To You" in English (although never released in UK); "L'Amour Tourne En Rond" is French version of Decca A-side "Around and Around" EP (FRENCH PS) DECCA 457.022 (1964) A. POUR TOI (FOR YOU) LAISSE LE SOLEIL SECHER TES LARMES B. J'AIME TROP JOHNNY (HAVE YOU EVER BEEN LONELY) DIX MILLE FOIS "Laisse Le Soleil Secher Tes Larmes" is French version of Decca A-side "Don't Let The Sun Catch You Crying"; "J'aime Trop Johnny" is "Have You Ever Been Lonely" (then) recently recorded by THE CARAVELLES; "Dix Mille Fois" is French version of Decca B-side "Loving Baby" it might also be the appropriate time to mention the recent death of TONY MEEHAN, ex-SHADOWS, who wrote and produced many of LOUISE CORDET's records, following an accident at home a couple of weeks ago. clunk click every flip, Michael Clunkie -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Fri, 9 Dec 2005 23:03:43 -0000 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Re: Kim Fowley Phil Milstein on Kim Fowley: > has any Spectrocentric artist amassed a more extensive > discography? Yes, (I think :-)) Jack Nitzsche: http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/discography.htm Martin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Fri, 9 Dec 2005 15:21:40 -0800 (PST) From: Tom Taber Subject: Re: Joe South "The Purple People Eater Meets The Witch Doctor" Richard Fannan wrote: > As a kid, I had bought the record for Purple People Eater > Meets the Witch Doctor after hearing it on the radio once. > I was pleasantly surprised when, several months later, the > flip side became the huge hit. As a kid (just turned 9) I loved Purple People Eater and the Witch Doctor. By the time I realized I could BUY them, they were off the radio and not in stores - but I found "Purple People Eater Meets the Witch Doctor" in a 45 rack at the Supermarket, and got my mom to buy it for me. It was a year or more before I found out "Chantilly Lace" was the hit side! That was about 10,000 45s ago, and 2 of them have been Joe South's version. Tom Taber -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2005 00:38:25 -0000 From: Regina Litman Subject: Re: Joe South and Dennis St. John Artie Wayne wrote: > I remember having breakfast with Joe South, at the Continental > Hyatt House in Hollywood, when he was on a promotional tour > for his own record, "Walk a Mile in My Shoes". [Still one of > my favorites.] > > I had a chance to tell him how much his writing had inspired > me, "I Never promised you a Rose Garden", "Down in the > Boondocks", and how innovative I thought his productions were. > He appreciated being appreciated [as we all do]. > > As we were starting to discuss the unique modern rhythyms he > used behind his Country flavored songs, we were joined by > Dennis St.John who played drums on all of Joe's hits, as well > as most of the hits made in Atlanta. We all shared a lot of > stories and had a good old time! Thanks for sharing this with us. Joe South was one of those songwriters who, although he had hits of his own, really made his mark with songs that others recorded. The name Dennis St. John is quite familiar to me because he was in Neil Diamond's band for several years. I knew he was from Atlanta, but I didn't know about the Joe South connection. > P.S. I'd be honored if you dropped by my updated website and > signed my new guestbook http://artiewayne.com Thanks for the invitation. I was there a few days ago and was impressed by your background. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2005 00:10:24 -0000 From: John DeAngelis Subject: Re: Christmas is the time to be with the Orchids Mick Patrick wrote: > Before moving to the Roulette label in 1965 for a final > release cut with producer Teddy Randazzo, the Orchids > delivered two further singles on Columbia, including the > rare delight of a girl group Christmas record. That seasonal > offering is now playing at musica: > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica Thanks so much for this song, Mick! It's beautiful! John DeAngelis, NYC -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Fri, 9 Dec 2005 19:41:47 EST From: John Black Subject: Re: Diane Ray Ronnie Allen wrote: > I've been able to find very little information about Diane Ray, > however, other than the fact that she was born in Gastonia, > North Carolina in 1942. I think her CD called "The Exciting > Years" is really good. There's no great "message songs" there, > but I throughly enjoy her singing and her enthusiasm. Does > anyone have any additional information about Diane Ray? Does > she still perform? Diane Ray is an intriguing subject. She seems to have come out of nowhere--and then gone right back there! Seriously, I've always been surprised that she managed to have an entire LP released. That's not a knock on her talent, just my spin on her obscurity then and now. Perhaps a Svengali type was backing her, but she really didn't desire a show business career. Just speculating. John Black -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2005 00:27:37 -0000 From: Regina Litman Subject: Re: Motown covers . . . "My Girl" by the Mamas and Papas Alan V Karr wrote: > I failed to note that I found the above to be undistinguished > compared to the preceding Beat covers I listed. Also IMO Mamas > & Papas' take on My Girl probably could have been an A side but > that's just me. Back when the album containing this came out, WPGC, a Top 40 station in the Washington area, played this cut and said that it was going to be the group's next single. It didn't happen this way, and now I wonder if it was just the DJ's wishful thinking or if there was a change in plans. Around that time (possibly on the same album), they did another Motown song, "Dancing in the Street", which included some of the place names in the Virginia suburbs of DC, where Cass had grown up and John Phillips had also spent some time. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2005 08:46:34 +0000 From: Austin Powell Subject: Viva Records/Music Like Phil, I thought the Viva label design was awesome. My copies of the Shindogs single "Who Do You Think You Are", part written by Delaney Bramlett and produyced by Leon Russell and Sonny Curtis's "My Way Of Life" are kinda prize possessions receiving them as I did back in 1966 (?) from Ed Silvers at Viva Records. In Britain, the Fontana label issued only one single from Viva, "Questions And Answers" by The California In Crowd" (renamed for UK release because there was a British group called The In Crowd), but they did release a couple of The Midnight String Quartet LPs. Am I right in believing Warner Music now owns the masters ? But, hey...I just love that logo. Austin P. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Fri, 9 Dec 2005 18:57:15 -0800 From: Elizabeth Curtis Subject: Re: Diane Ray Ronnie Allen wrote: > I've been able to find very little information about Diane Ray, > however, other than the fact that she was born in Gastonia, > North Carolina in 1942. I think her CD called "The Exciting > Years" is really good. There's no great "message songs" there, > but I throughly enjoy her singing and her enthusiasm. Does > anyone have any additional information about Diane Ray? Does > she still perform? I like Diane Ray a lot -- "The Exciting Years" is a great album. Everything I know about Diane I learned from the album's liner notes. From the back of "The Exciting Years" LP: "....Diane is a pretty, 17-year-old teenager who hails from Gastonia, North Carolina. She's five-foot-four, weighs 115, has blue eyes, blonde hair, loves to dance, listen to records, go on picnics, watch drive-in movies, and in short, do all the things that the average gal her age would like. But then, she also does a few things more. She has a daily radio show on Gastonia's WLTC. She sings with her own combo, Diane Ray and the Continentals. She makes constant appearances at record hops and television shows. And of course, she has her recording sessions for Mercury. Diane says she's the luckiest girl in the world, and the happiest. "I've always wanted to be a record artist, but I honestly didn't think it could happen this fast." She may be the only who didn't. "When I first heard her sing, I knew she was a natural," is the comment made by Shelby Singleton, Mercury's vice-president and artist and repertoire directory. Singleton discovered Diane when she entered a talent contest put on by the Thons radio chain in North Carolina. Diane won the contest, but Singleton was sold on her even before the ballots were counted. He signed her to a recording contact on the spot. Her first record for Mercury, "Please Don't Talk to the Lifeguard," was a national hit and Diane was on her way." I wish I knew what she was up to now, and if she still performs. Take care, Elizabeth -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2005 00:46:27 -0000 From: Regina Litman Subject: Re: Joe South - "The Purple People Eater Meets the Witch Doctor" Brent Cash wrote: > Since Joe South is in the news here, I thought I'd bring up > a zany one by him called "The Purple People Eater Meets The > Witch Doctor". It's on NRC (National Recording Corp.) and is > exactly what the title sounds like it would be. The writing > credits a team of J.P. Richardson-R.Johnson. So, perhaps The > Big Bopper had his hand in this one? It's absolutely hilarious, > and, fittingly, the edge of the vinyl is severly warped. The > flip is written by Joe, "My Fondest Memories" and published by, > of course, Lowery Music Co.Inc. I've heard of this song but have never heard it. I had seen an anthology album on Amazon (possibly an import) that contains it, but I ended up getting a different anthology that doesn't contain it. I have three Joe South anthologies on CD, but they concentrate on the period around the time "Games People Play", "Walk a Mile in My Shoes", and "Don't it Make You Want to Go Home" charted in 1969 and the very early 1970s. I'm not familiar with much that he did either before or after that time. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2005 08:11:01 +0100 From: Eddy Subject: Re: Kim Fowley Martin Roberts wrote: > Record collector, Benoit Conte compiled a discography of Kim > Fowley's record releases and its positively Nitzschean in its > breadth and diversity. Sadly it doesn't seem to have been > published anywhere. So where can one view this then ? Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2005 07:22:22 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Viva Records/Music Phil...Austin...How ya'doin'? Yes...Viva music was the publishing arm of Viva records...and no, I really don't know much about the record company. I joined the publishing company in 1970 under some interesting circumstances. I recently had relocated to Hollywood from New York during what I call the "California music Gold Rush". I spent most of my money on independent productions, but this wasn't like New York, I couldn't just put my lead vocal on a track, make up a name, and sell it to some record company. Companies like Warner Brothers, A+M, RCA, etc. were only interested in signing real artists...and I didn't have any! During this frustrating time I ran up an $1800 bill at Amigo recording studios, which was owned by Viva music and wasn't able to pay it. I went to my old friend Ed Silvers, who was running the company. He was my former producer at Liberty records, the man who brought me into both April-Blackwood music and Flomar music, and I offered to work for Viva until I paid off the Studio bill. After a long lecture, and telling me he didn't need another professional manager, he reluctantly hired me at a fraction of what I was worth. For the next year I represented some of the best staff writers in the buisness, Jerry Fuller, Sonny Curtis, J.J.Cale, Jimmy Griffen, DeWayne Blackwell and Alan O'Day, who was just starting his career. After getting dozens of cover records including those by 3 Dog Night, Bobby Sherman, The Jackson 5, Anne Murray, Helen Reddy, and updating old songs in the catalog like, "You're 16", I stayed with the company. Ed doubled...then tripled my salary...generously giving me stock options when the company was bought by Warner Brothers! Regards, Artie Wayne http://artiewayne.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2005 11:17:20 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Joe South "The Purple People Eater Meets The Witch Doctor" Tom Taber wrote: > I found "Purple People Eater Meets the Witch Doctor" in a 45 > rack at the Supermarket, and got my mom to buy it for me. It > was a year or more before I found out "Chantilly Lace" was > the hit side! I had that EXACT same experience. My parents bought me Witch Doctor and Purple People Eater for my birthday. Then they found the Big Bopper flipside. I too didn't know about Chantilly Lace until long afterward!! Funny world. JB -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2005 11:22:41 -0500 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Diane Ray Elizabeth Curtis wrote: > I like Diane Ray a lot -- "The Exciting Years" is a great album. > Everything I know about Diane I learned from the album's liner > notes. I got a bone to pick with Diane personally. When she described the lifeguard as "...tall and handsome golden tanned, six feet tall and man oh man..." my insecurities were given a massive boost. At 5'9" and not considering myself 'handsome' (even though I am), I thought I'd never get me a chick. JB/still soldiering onward in girlville -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2005 18:55:00 -0000 From: Mark Maldwyn Subject: Re: Motown covers . . . good 'n' bad Paul Oliverio wrote: > An atrocity >>This Old Heart of Mine<< covered by Rod Stewart. That's still not as bad as Phil Collins' Motown 'covers' or anything else he's done actually. Nevertheless, Truly Smith and Elkie Brooks did fine Motown versions in the U.K. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2005 19:26:27 -0000 From: Mark Maldwyn Subject: Re: Diane Ray Diane Ray's version of "Please don't talk to the Lifeguard" is fine as is Andrea Carroll's version which I find more 'experimental'. Whose recording came first? Mark M -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Sat, 10 Dec 2005 15:16:19 -0500 From: Rex Patton Subject: Joe South Paul Oliverio: > Not only was Joe South a session musician on BLONDE ON BLONDE > but the original bi-fold album jacket had a photo of him. Among his other session work, that's also Joe doing that swampy opening guitar lick to Aretha's "Chain Of Fools". -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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