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Spectropop - Digest Number 2138



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 12 messages in this issue.


Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Candy & the Kisses "The 81"
           From: Hans Huss 
      2. Re: How to do the 81!!
           From: Dave Monroe 
      3. Re: LPs, CDs, MP3s ...
           From: Phil Hall 
      4. Max Crook & his Musitron
           From: Mick Patrick 
      5. workin' it with the Fourmost Authority
           From: Phil X Milstein 
      6. Dumb Angel Gazette #4 Art Show in San Francisco
           From: Brian Chidester 
      7. Re: The 81
           From: Howard Earnshaw 
      8. Re: Candy & the Kisses "The 81"
           From: Dave Monroe 
      9. Run Joey Run
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     10. Re: workin' it with the Fourmost Authority
           From: Regina Litman 
     11. "The 81" and other Songs Played in Philly but not in DC
           From: Regina Litman 
     12. Music City Weekender
           From: Dave Monroe 


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________________________________________________________________________ Message: 1 Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2005 00:46:04 -0800 (PST) From: Hans Huss Subject: Re: Candy & the Kisses "The 81" Will Stos wrote: > It's pretty neat that a mid-size hit like "In My Lonely Room," > could get remade and turned into another mid-size hit like > "The 81." I always really enjoyed the Martha and the > Vandellas' song and thought it should have been a Top 20 > contender at least. Does anyone know if it was one of those > regional hits that made the Top 10 in some places and didn't > chart in others? I, too, have always loved "In My Lonely Room", it's a wonderful recording and easily a contender for a Martha & the Vandellas Top Five. (I recall my amazement at its non-inclusion in the 1974 "Anthology".) As for regional success, it's hard to tell if a mid-sized hit in 1964 was a hit in R&B territories as well as Billboard did not publish an R&B chart from December 1963 to January 1965. I pulled out my old copy of the Cash Box Black Contemporary Singles Charts, 1960-1984 (G. Albert & F. Hoffman, eds., Scarecrow Press, 1986) - for the first time in years, great fun! - and was thrilled to discover that "In My Lonely Room" did in fact make # 6 (in May, 1964), a higher chart placing than both "Quicksand" (# 7) and "Live Wire" (# 11), and, surprisingly, "Dancing In The Street" ( # 8). Not sure about the accurateness of Cash Box's "Top 50 in R&B Locations" (as the list was called at the time) but most likely this would indicate that the song - most deservedly - did have a few more admirers. I checked on another favourite from those days, the Marvelettes' truly wonderful "As Long As I Know He's Mine" (which only made # 47 on Billboard's HOT 100, week ending December 14, 1963), and was happy to find that it reached # 3 on Cash Box's R&B chart.) By curious coincidence, I recently picked up a nice piece of memorabilia, a copy of the original sheet music for "The 81" with the title given as "the Eighty-One". (I'd like to think that it's Kenny Gamble's own longhand.) Will try to post a scan to the site this weekend. Altogether now: "Tired of doin' the monkey, tired of doin' the swim...". Hasse Huss -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2005 08:00:01 -0800 (PST) From: Dave Monroe Subject: Re: How to do the 81!! Tony Leong wrote: > Someone recently showed me how the 81 was done!! Bear with me, > I can DO it, but describing it is a bit hard!! ... 'Cos it's so fine, in a big boss line, of course. Thanks! And I know EXACTLY what you mean in re: Siobhan Fahey and/or ZOOM. Okay, now on to the Kennedy assassin, the missing matter in the universe, the Higgs Boson, and the skin color of dinosaurs ... -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2005 13:45:23 -0000 From: Phil Hall Subject: Re: LPs, CDs, MP3s ... Tom Taber wrote: > You know what I miss with most CD players? In addition to > liking holding a CD, 45, 78; I like WATCHING it go 'round, Like a lot of other Spectropoppers, I love the look and feel of an LP. Looking at the pictures, watching the label spin around and reading the liner notes; even just reading the songwriter credits are all part of the experience of being a music collector. However, I recently bought an mp3 player and I can tell you that, like it or not, they will put a very significant dent in the CD market in the near future. You can argue about which format will dominate; mp3, aac, wma, etc. But since CD's are just one digital form of music, I suspect that in 2 or 3 years, they'll be on the way to being replaced by the new ones. In fact, long-term, I think that as a collector's format, vinyl will survive longer than CD's. Dave Monroe: > But what I worried about with CDs I worry even more about > with mp3s, that the ability to select ONLY the tracks one > thinks at last one wants, certain tracks will simply > disappear, at least from ready circulation. I imagine that in the relatively near future, even import companies like Bear Family will begin selling their music digitally. So the obscure tracks will remain somewhat obscure, but they won't go away. Because of mp3 trading, legal or otherwise, they may even proliferate to a degree. Phil H. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2005 20:26:50 -0000 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Max Crook & his Musitron Ah, Max Crook. How would Del Shannon's career have been without him? I just searched the S'pop Discussion Forum Archives for the words "Max", "Crook" and "Musitron" and found these hits: http://tinyurl.com/ceche So I guess there are quite a few of you who would be interested in the CD that has been the soundtrack to my working day today, "The Sounds Of Tomorrow" by Max Crook and Scott Ludwig. Notable tracks include: "Runaway", recorded at the Robbs' studio with Del Shannon on guitar and production. "Beeswax", recorded at Motown Studios in 1959. Read more about the CD here: http://www.cherryred.co.uk/rpm/artists/varioussounds.htm Are any of the recordings Max released as "Maximilian" available on CD, I wonder? Fascinating booklet written by Mark Brend, author of the book "Strange Sounds: Offbeat Instrumentals and Sonic Experiments in Pop". Ah, Max Crook. How would Del Shannon's career have been without him? Any questions? Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2005 13:22:06 -0500 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: workin' it with the Fourmost Authority I think anyone would be hard-pressed to nominate a cooler record than "Dance, Dance," by the Fourmost Authority. Where I could once simply accept this record on face value, however, more and more I find myself needing to know something about it, and about the cats behind it. Does anyone know anything about the Fourmost Authority? (I've seen their name printed as both "Four...," and "Fore..." Which is correct?) They were on GNP Crescendo -- were they an LA group? Were any of their other sides half as great as "Dance, Dance"? (Were anyone's?) Has "Dance, Dance" ever been comped? Has anyone noticed the awesome line, tossed off during the fadeout, that reads, "I ain't had a woman in 69 years" ... oh, wait -- wrong song. The "Dance, Dance" trailoff goes, "C'mon, work it. Take your clothes off, baby"? Dig, Dig, --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2005 13:22:15 -0500 From: Brian Chidester Subject: Dumb Angel Gazette #4 Art Show in San Francisco Hi All, Below are the details for the latest event/party/art show that Domenic Priore and I are holding. It will be in San Francisco, for anyone living in the Bay Area, and it's free. Hope to see some Spectropop readers there! Yours, Brian Chidester BEATNIK SURF AESTHETIC: THE SAN FRANCISCO LAUNCH PARTY FOR DUMB ANGEL #4: ALL SUMMER LONG Friday, December 30, 2005 7:00-11:00 p.m. Mollusk Surf Shop 4500 Irving Street @ 46th Ave. San Francisco, California Featuring the art of John Severson and Rick Griffin (SURFER magazine, 1960-1965), Michael Dormer (Hot Curl, MUSCLE BEACH PARTY, SHRIMPENSTEIN), Frank Holmes (the Beach Boys unreleased SMILE album cover and booklet, 1966), Thomas Campbell (SPROUT) and John McCambridge, Mollusk?s own board-haper/photographer/ painter. Live surf instrumental music provided by L.A.'s top combo, the Boardwalkers, featuring guitar ace Dan Valentie ? formerly with Paisley Underground garage rock godz the Unclaimed. Oil-lamp light show will be complimented by juxtaposed screenings of Greg MacGillivray and Jim Freeman's film FREE & EASY (1967) and John Severson's PACIFIC VIBRATIONS (1969), Exploding Plastic Inevitable-style. The show opens with an audio carpetorium preview of the original 1966 SMILE album, compiled by Domenic Priore, author of "Smile: The Story of Brian Wilson's Lost Masterpiece" (Sanctuary Books, London, 2005, forewords by Brian Wilson and Van Dyke Parks). Conversation, dancing, snacks and liquid refreshments will be part of the environment. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2005 14:51:52 EST From: Howard Earnshaw Subject: Re: The 81 Dave Monroe wrote: > Here's a perennial question amongst my set. Just how DOES one > do The 81? "In a big boss line," sure, but ... John H.wrote: > Good question. I'm still trying to figure out how to do the Zonk. > (The Peanut Duck is a lot easier.) .....never mind all that, we still get a kick out of shaggin' here in the UK :-)) Howard ps.. looking at his UK copy of the 'The 81' on Cameo Parkway.... -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2005 12:44:03 -0800 (PST) From: Dave Monroe Subject: Re: Candy & the Kisses "The 81" Hans Huss wrote: > I, too, have always loved "In My Lonely Room", it's a wonderful > recording and easily a contender for a Martha & the Vandellas > Top Five.... "(We've Got) Honey Love" is my No. 1 M&TVs track, and hovers high on my list of all-time Motown favorites (after, say, Smokey Robinson's "The Tracks of My Tears" and The Velvelettes' "He Was Really saying Something"). But hope you're familiar with The Action's cover of "IMLR." They also recorded excellent covers of "I'll Keep On Holding On" (The Marvelettes), "Since I Lost My Baby" (The Temptations), "I Love You (Yeah!)" (The Impressions), "Baby You've Got It" (Maurice and The Radiants), "Hey Sah-Lo-Ney" (Mickey Lee Lane), "Land of 100 Dances" (Cannibal and The Headhunters), "The Cissy" and "Harlem Shuffle" (Bob and Earl), and that's just what was either officially released or what comes to mind. See, e.g., ... http://uppers.org/showArticle.asp?article=8 http://www.ready-steady-go.org.uk/action.htm http://www.nostalgiacentral.com/music/action.htm -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2005 16:45:38 -0500 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Run Joey Run Anyone know who the female voice on David Geddes's "Run Joey Run" was? The record is the best example I know of of a post-'60s, male-centered take on the Shangri-Las's essence -- OK, the Tubes's "Don't Touch Me There" was good, too, but more overtly tongue-in- cheek -- and the lady does an excellent job of filling in for Betty and etc.. Dig, --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2005 23:54:06 -0000 From: Regina Litman Subject: Re: workin' it with the Fourmost Authority Phil X Milstein wrote: > I think anyone would be hard-pressed to nominate a cooler record > than "Dance, Dance," by the Fourmost Authority. Where I could > once simply accept this record on face value, however, more and > more I find myself needing to know something about it, and about > the cats behind it. Does anyone know anything about the Fourmost > Authority? (I've seen their name printed as both "Four...," and > "Fore..." Which is correct?) They were on GNP Crescendo -- were > they an LA group? Were any of their other sides half as great as > "Dance, Dance"? (Were anyone's?) Has "Dance, Dance" ever been > comped? Has anyone noticed the awesome line, tossed off during > the fadeout, that reads, "I ain't had a woman in 69 years" ... > oh, wait -- wrong song. The "Dance, Dance" trailoff goes, "C'mon, > work it. Take your clothes off, baby"? 1. In the Washington, DC, area in the summer of 1967, I heard two versions of "Dance, Dance" on the radio at different times on different stations. WEAM played the Fourmost Authority's version early in the summer, but WPGC did not play this one. Later that summer, WPGC played a version by local favorites the Chartbusters (who had had a national hit called "She's the One" in 1964), but WEAM didn't play this one. 2. I liked the version by the Chartbusters but LOVED the version by the Fourmost Authority (and I remember the spelling being "Fourmost"). What I really liked about the Fourmost Authority's version was a very smooth guitar sound in the instrumental break. Maybe it wasn't a guitar - maybe it was an organ or electric piano. 3. I've never heard the version by the Fourmost Authority since then, and I'd never come across a reference to it until now. However, I do have the Chartbusters' version in my collection on a group anthology I got in the mid-1990s that was put out by a company called Eagle that's in, I think, Germany. I'd love to hear the Fourmost Authority's version again. 4. What happened with "Dance, Dance" on Washington area radio in the summer of 1967 also happened with a song called "Happy". Two different versions were played at different times and on different radio stations. The Blades of Grass' version was played on WPGC early in the summer, while the Sunshine Company's version was played on WEAM later in the season. While I enjoyed both versions of "Dance, Dance", I much preferred the Sunshine Company's version of "Happy" and still do. I have both in my collection on various artist compilations. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sat, 26 Nov 2005 00:20:19 -0000 From: Regina Litman Subject: "The 81" and other Songs Played in Philly but not in DC Tony Leong wrote: > When I first did the 81 to "In My Lonley Room", it was a bit > hard being that the Vandellas track had a faster tempo than the > Candy cut!! Too bad there's no footage existing of Candy and > the Kisses performing the song. > > And Will, yes, my Mom said that "Do The 81" was played a lot > here in New York in the mid-60's. It was one of those > nationally unknown, but big in the NY area hits like "It's > Gonna Take A Miracle", and the majority of Ruby and The > Romantics records!!! Oh, and how can I forget to mention > "Whenever A Teenager Cires" by Reparata and the Delrons!!!! "The 81" by Candy and the Kisses is one of those records I NEVER heard on any Washington, DC, radio station as either a current record during its chart run or as an oldie in later years but came to know very well from oldies radio after I moved to Philadelphia 19 years ago this month. Another such record is "Sally's Saying Something" by Billy Harner. Plus a couple that really are by Martha and the Vandellas - "Third Finger, Left Hand" and "Love Makes Me Do Crazy Things". Regarding "In My Lonely Room" by Martha and the Vandellas - one time during the prime of Beatlemania, one of my best friends and I sat studying the Top 40 survey of DC-area station WWDC (which converted gradually to an easy listening format between 1964 and 1966) that we had picked up in a local record store. I named off songs I hadn't heard yet, and this was one of them. My friend said something along the lines that I wasn't missing anything and that this song, which was ranked somewhere around mid-survey, ought to be #40 - in other words, she didn't like it very much. Of course, for a really bad song, she might have said that it didn't belong on the survey at all. A few observations to be made: 1. We were only 11 going on 12 at the time, April 1964, and probably didn't like anything that didn't come from Liverpool. 2. We weren't exposed much to other cultures and still had to shake some of the prejudices of our parents - hers were Southerners, and my father, though a respected businessman whose store was located in the heart of a black area, feared that race riots would cause destruction of his business. So, it was hard for us to appreciate some of the songs done by black acts in 1964. My parents were fans of some of the more mainstream black artists, such as Nat King Cole (whose death the following year deeply saddened my mother) and Louis Armstrong (my father bought his "Hello Dolly" album, and the whole family enjoyed listening to it), and this helped open the door for me to enjoy the Supremes and other acts that I started to hear a lot on the radio that year and well into the future. 3. Years later, when I finally did get to hear "In My Lonely Room" (on DC radio, when I still lived there), I found that I really liked it a lot, and still do. It is probably one of my favorite Martha and the Vandellas' records. (But I don't like "Love Makes Me Do Crazy Things" very much.) 4. In April 1964, one non-British act my friend and I probably would have liked a lot was the Beach Boys. They have a similarly- titled song called "In My Room" that I consider to be one of my all-time LEAST favorite songs by the group. If this was the song my friend had said should have been #40, I would have probably said it didn't belong on the survey at all! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Fri, 25 Nov 2005 15:27:45 -0800 (PST) From: Dave Monroe Subject: Music City Weekender By the way, knowing at least a few of you are in Nashville, I'll be down there this Saturday night spinning 60s soul 45s at the Boys Named Sue Scooter Club Music City Weekender ... http://www.bnssc.com/index.php?q=node/59 ... so if you happen to be there, or happen by, do say hello, I'll be the guy who looks least likely to be spinning records there, well, spinning records there. Okay, maybe I oughtta pack, so ... -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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