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Spectropop - Digest Number 2059



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.


Topics in this digest:

      1. Metropolitan Soul playlist - 7th September
           From: Simon White 
      2. Re: Ventures
           From: Jack Russell 
      3. Brooklyn Benefit
           From: Brian 
      4. Tin Pan Alley
           From: Dave Monroe 
      5. Re: I Spy Shelby Flint
           From: Anthony Parsons 
      6. Re: " It's Written All Over My Face"
           From: Hans Huss 
      7. Re: Naomi Wilson; The Carolines; The Victorians; and "What Makes Little Girls Cry"
           From: Julio Niño 
      8. Re: Royalties to the right people
           From: Mike Rashkow 
      9. Righteous Brothers Chart Entries Request
           From: Peter Richmond 
     10. Re: Relief Telethon tonight
           From: Artie Wayne 
     11. Jigsaw - One Way Street?
           From: Bob Radil 
     12. Message from Jean Thomas
           From: Ken Charmer 
     13. Keep a Splicin' Little Richard
           From: John DeAngelis 
     14. Re: Kenny Shepard sings Van McCoy
           From: Brent Cash 
     15. Re: Shelby Flint
           From: Gary Myers 
     16. Re: The Victorians
           From: Stefano Boni 
     17. Re: 'He Don't Really Love You'
           From: Simon White 
     18. Re: Ventures
           From: Joop 
     19. Re: Tin Pan Alley
           From: Roger Smith 
     20. Re: "What Makes Little Girls Cry"
           From: Joop 
     21. Re:  Slippin' and Slidin'
           From: Simon White 
     22. Re: Royalties to the right people
           From: Fred Clemens 
     23. Epic 'Memory Lane' 45s
           From: Michael 
     24. Ray Singer & Johnny Arthey
           From: Mark Frumento 
     25. "Mbube"
           From: Phil Hall 


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Message: 1 Date: Fri, 09 Sep 2005 09:16:18 +0100 From: Simon White Subject: Metropolitan Soul playlist - 7th September I won't bore readers with details of the first hour of this, the third 'Metropolitan Soul' show on Starpoint. I will say however, that it contained tracks by Esther Phillips, Major Lance, Marlena Shaw, Betty Lavette, The Tams, Jackey Beavers and The Fantastic Four - but all from a period post 1970. This then, is the second hour playlist: NORTHERN Soul / 60s HOUR HONEY BEE - DIANA ROSS AND THE SUPREMES STOP AND LISTEN - PATTIE DREW HELP ME - MITTY COLLIER WITH ALL THATS IN ME - MARV JOHNSON I JUST KEPT ON DANCING - DOUG BANKS THIS GETS TO ME - POOKIE HUDSON GOTTA GIVE HER LOVE - THE VOLUMES KEEP IT COMING - BOBBY GARRETT IT MUST BE LOVE - INTRUDERS I SEE A RAINBOW - EDWIN STARR & BLINKY ------ HARLEM RUMBLE - FRANK FOSTER GIVE ME ONE MORE CHANCE - CLYDE MCPHATTER IT'S TORTURE - MAXINE BROWN I'LL NEVER LET YOU GO - THE O'JAYS WHAT GOES AROUND - THE FOREVERS GOTTA TELL SOMEBODY - TONY TALENT STUCK ON YOU - YVONNE CARROL I'VE GOT A SECRET - SHARPEES AINT GONNA LET IT GET ME DOWN - GAYLE HARRIS THIS TIME TOMORROW - TAMMY MONTGOMERY New show live on Wednesday 14th September, 1.30 pm GMT http://www.starpointradio.com/ Simon White -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 2 Date: Thu, 8 Sep 2005 18:47:24 +0100 From: Jack Russell Subject: Re: Ventures Dennis Hoban wrote: > Amen to that, Gary. My uncle's guitar teacher was Nokie Edwards of > The Ventures. I have his solo album, "Nokie!" My uncle was MY first > guitar teacher. Which makes me, in a weird way, Nokie's guitar > grandson. Les Paul certainly invented the electric guitar and Chet Atkins astounded us all as kids growing up post-folk/Pete Seeger etc. But it was Buddy Holly and The Ventures who gave the solid-body guitar its real birth here in the UK. The Shadows followed hot on those heels but The Ventures were just that bit more jazzy with their Jazzmaster sound, as opposed to the Stratocaster of Buddy and Hank Marvin. Walk Don't Run and Perfidia were slavishly copied by my band long before we thought of getting a vocalist! They deserve every accolade that can be laid at their door. I am not sure if it was true or false but I once played a gig in Wick, which is as far north in Scotland as you can go without a boat, and in the local pub after the gig we were introduced to a guy who, local legend had it, had been the bass player with The Ventures. Now because The Ventures were really only two guys they may have had itinerant sidemen and it could have been true. I was a great fan but in the UK we did not have access to really good lineup info so I could never prove it one way or another. Does anyone know if it could have been true or whether the locals were just pulling our wire? Jack Russell -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 3 Date: Thu, 08 Sep 2005 23:12:38 -0000 From: Brian Subject: Brooklyn Benefit Well, it was all good intentions, but I now see (too late) the exact same message I just submitted was already posted here this morning. Here are the email addresses back in that got lopped off there. Naturally, "(AT)" = @ and "(DOT)" = . Brian ------------------ Trinity Parish Church Episcopal Discretionary Fund 200 N Elm St. Searcy AR 72143-5271 (Write "Katrina Fund" in memo line of check) paypal to: trinityparish (AT) yahoo (DOT) com Send donations to: NOMC Emergency Fund Funds will be distributed by: SW LA Area Health Education Center Foundation, Inc. 103 Independence Blvd. Lafayette LA 70506 desk: 337-989-0001 fax: 337-989-1401 Contact: Kathy Richard directly at (337) 989-0001 email: finance (AT) swlahec (DOT) com http://www.swlahec.com/ musiciank (AT) swlahec (DOT) com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 4 Date: Thu, 8 Sep 2005 15:59:43 -0700 (PDT) From: Dave Monroe Subject: Tin Pan Alley Tin Pan Alley (tin pan AL-ee) noun Popular music industry; composers, songwriters, and music publishers considered collectively. [After West 28th Street in New York City where music publishers were formerly centered. From the cacophony of cheap pianos and hack musicians the area came to be known as Tin Pan Alley (apparently from the term tinny piano) and eventually became generalized to refer to the whole music industry. The term, popular in the past, is less used today.] The corresponding term in the UK is Denmark Street in London. The UK capital also has the literary equivalent of Tin Pan Alley/Denmark Street in Grub Street, a collective term for hack writers. Today's word in Visual Thesaurus: http://visualthesaurus.com/?w1=tin+pan+alley "[Neil Diamond's] got one foot planted in Tin Pan Alley songcraft and the other in Vegas shtick." Greg Kot; Kneel to Neil; Chicago Tribune; Aug 2, 2005. This week's theme: metaphorical terms having origins in New York. [...] Pronunciation: http://wordsmith.org/words/tin_pan_alley.wav http://wordsmith.org/words/tin_pan_alley.ram Permalink: http://wordsmith.org/words/tin_pan_alley.html http://wordsmith.org/awad/index.html -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 5 Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2005 02:50:37 -0500 From: Anthony Parsons Subject: Re: I Spy Shelby Flint S.J. Dibai: > I think a lot of people don't realize that (Shelby Flint's) voice > was featured prominently in an episode of "I SPY" entitled "Laya." > There was an Earle Hagen melody that was used as a recurring theme > throughout the episode, and then during the tag scene we got to > hear a recording of Shelby singing it with lyrics over a silent > film sequence of a broken-hearted Bill Cosby wandering through the > ruins of ancient Greece. It was one of the most beautiful scenes in > the history of television. The song, incidentally, was called "The > Voice In The Wind." Did Shelby put this out on record in the '60s? > It's really a great song. Hi SJ: Your post sent me to my soundtrack section and the booklet accompanying Film Score Monthly's I Spy CD. While the track you mention is not on the CD, there is a reference to it in the booklet. According to the notes (I assume by Lukas Kendall), Earle Hagen won an Emmy for Best Dramatic Score for Laya. There is even a picture of him accepting the Emmy in the booklet. Lyrics for The Voice In The Wind are credited to Gene Lees. Further reading in the booklet reveals that the master tapes for Laya "could not immediately be found but hopefully will be located for a future volume". Of further note is the fact that there were 2 I Spy soundtrack LPs issued in the 60s, one on Warner Bros. (WS 1637, May 1966) and a second one on Capitol (ST 2839, January 1968). These albums are distinguished by the fact that unlike many 'soundtrack' LPs of that era, these re- recordings used the original orchestrations. The Warner LP was produced by Hagen himself and the Capitol LP is said to be "produced and released by Capitol". I don't know if The Voice In The Wind is on either LP, but I'm sure someone else here could verify. I have no idea if a 45 was ever released. Obviously Film Score Monthly plans to use Laya when they release a second volume of I Spy. I Spy is unique in that there were original scores composed for each of its 82 episodes, with 53 of those scores by Earle Hagen. My own favorite Earle Hagen compositions are the original theme from That Girl (the instrumental used in the first two seasons) and his exciting theme from The Mod Squad. I've never seen the I Spy episode Laya, but am very much looking forward to catching it based on your description. Sincerely, Antone -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 6 Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2005 01:08:32 -0700 (PDT) From: Hans Huss Subject: Re: " It's Written All Over My Face" I wrote: > Jimmie Raye's 'That'll Get It' is Moon Shot 6708 ... The uptown > ballad flip, 'It's Written All Over Your Face', is equally > wonderful... Phil M: > Not the same song as Marva Holiday's of that title, is it? No Phil, it's a different tune entirely. Hasse -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 7 Date: Fri, 09 Sep 2005 12:07:43 -0000 From: Julio Niño Subject: Re: Naomi Wilson; The Carolines; The Victorians; and "What Makes Little Girls Cry" Hola everybody. S.J. Dibai wrote about Naomi wilson: > ... I don't believe I'm crazy.....or at least as crazy as this > story suggests. Did (Naomi) Wilson's version (of "Gotta Find A > Way") become a hit anywhere? Where was she from? Any info on her > Swan connection? And what's the 411 on Theresa Lindsey, for that > matter? I don´t know anything about Naomi Wilson, but I like her Vandellas- ish "Gotta Find A Way". I also like the flip, a version of The Students' "So Young". I have another question about her: is she the singer of "Come On Baby And Hurt Me" (what a suggestive title), by Naomi and Harry on Atco? And talking about great girl voices, I also want to thank Mick for playing the exciting "You Are My Baby" by The Carolines. It´s gorgeous. Apart from this song and the wonderful "Can´t Stop Loving The Boy", did they record anything else? The singer's voice immerses you violently in a kind of Brill Building fantasy. And finally, thanks also to Ian Slater for posting the Victorians´ "Monkey Stroll". I wasn´t familliar with it, and I think that, with "What Makes The Little Girls Cry" (which I first discovered, being a kid in bad company, now I´m just bad company, in the ultra- accelerated version of a Spanish punk combo) is my favorite song by them. By The Way, talking about "What Makes Little Girls Cry?". French singer Marie Laforêt , recorded in 1963 a marvelous song entitled "Qu´Est Ce Qui fait pleurer Les Filles?", a version of a Crewe-Gaudio song titled precisely "What Makes Little Girls Cry?". Could anybody please tell me who recorded the original version of that song? Thanks. Chao. Julio Niño. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 8 Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2005 08:28:37 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Royalties to the right people Artie: > As an African-American, it's incomprehensible to me that the > composer, Solomon Linda, a Black South African was denied the > monies due him, because at the time, under the rules of apartheid, > Blacks weren't allowed to earn royalties. Phil C: > Hi Artie, if I understand the story correctly, it seems ironic that > the apartheid ruling turned out to be the very reason that Solomon > Linda ever saw *any* money for "Mbube"/"Wimoweh"/"Lion Sleeps..." > during his lifetime....The real sleight-of-hand took place later > when the Tokens' flip of "Tina", namely "The Lion Sleeps Tonight", > began to chart....... Despite all parties now knowing that the song > was essentially another reworking of Solomon Linda's "Mbube" with > new lyrics, the revised copyright described "The Lion Sleeps > Tonight" as 'based on a song by Paul Campbell'. Well, not to be a contrarian--but: Miriam Makeba's eponymous first album, circa 1960 on RCA contains MBUBE and credits it to J. Linda. So what part of "we didn't write it" didn't these guys understand. I wouldn't expect any better from Hugo and Luigi. What did they ever do that was really any good anyway? Bunch of slick suits as far as I could tell. MR -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 9 Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2005 13:39:37 +0100 From: Peter Richmond Subject: Righteous Brothers Chart Entries Request I wonder if anyone out there in Spectropop, could assist me with some additional Righteous Brothers chart entry information for my website. Specifically, I would very much like to know the US & UK Album Chart entry details of; Dirty Dancing OST Ghost OST Unchained Melody - The Very Best Of The Righteous Brothers plus any Bill Medley entries on the US Country Music Charts If it is easier, then please contact me offlist. Many thanks. Peter. www.righteousbrothersdiscography.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 10 Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2005 07:14:09 -0700 (PDT) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Relief Telethon tonight Shelter from the Storm: A Concert for the Gulf Coast will air tonight in the United States at 8:oo Eastern time [shown on the West Coast at 8:00 Pacific time]. ABC, NBC, Fox, CBS, UPN and the WB will simulcast the hour long telethon to raise money for the victims of hurricane Katrina. Several cable networks have also signed on to air the show including E, Bravo, CNBC, Court TV, Lifetime, the Style network, TBS and USA Network. The concert will also air on radio and be streamed online, including AOL, Yahoo, and Real.com. The event will also be televised in 95 countries around the World. The musical artists schedueled to appear include Garth Brooks, Mariah Carey, Sheryl Crow, Paul Simon, Mary J. Blige, the Foo Fighters, Randy Newman, Rod Stewart, Alicia Keyes, Kanye West, the Dixie Chicks and Paul Simon. Regards, Artie Wayne http://artiewayne.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 11 Date: Fri, 09 Sep 2005 14:40:17 -0000 From: Bob Radil Subject: Jigsaw - One Way Street? RE: The MP3 posted in Musica, Jigsaw - One Way Street. Is this the same act that in 1975 had a hit with "Sky High" Bob Radil -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 12 Date: Fri, 09 Sep 2005 14:26:21 +0200 From: Ken Charmer Subject: Message from Jean Thomas I heard back from Jean Thomas after passing on the feedback from this group and this was her reply: --------------------------------------------------------------------- "Wow!! You guys know more about my background in the record industry than I do or can remember. They are wonderful reminders, at least about the ones I can remember! If you have a copy of a song or two on the Evie Sands LP, I'd love to hear it. I don't have any of those recordings. "Re Jeannie Thomas on "Say Something Sweet To Me"/"My Heart Has Told Me What To Do" on the Strand label? from Simon White: As for Jeannie Thomas or Jeanne Thomas (I was recorded under both of these names), I don't recall the songs or recording on the label mentioned above. If someone could send me one of the recordings I could answer that. "The only songs I know of that I recorded under Jeannie Thomas are "You're The Root Of My Evil" and "All You Had To Do Was Love Me" on the Minuteman label which was part of Columbia Records. As Jeanne Thomas I recorded "Life Of The Party" and "Too Good To Be Bad" which was for Bob Crewe's label New Voice, part of Bell Records, and as Jeanne Fox I recorded "Working Girl" (written and produced by Chip Taylor) for Rainy Day Records, part of Jay-Gee Records." --------------------------------------------------------------------- If anyone posts a track to Musica I'll pass it on to Jean. I hope to be able to post some of the lesser known tracks mentioned by Jean as she has offerred to get these to me later this year. More soon Ken -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 13 Date: Fri, 09 Sep 2005 15:18:57 -0000 From: John DeAngelis Subject: Keep a Splicin' Little Richard Country Paul wrote: > I don't remember if it was "Slippin' and Slidin'" or "Lucille" by > Little Richard which was about 1:20 in its original; some > judicious splicing stretched it out to about two minutes. I think the Little Richard song that had to be spliced in order to be made longer was "Keep A Knockin'." John DeAngelis -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 14 Date: Fri, 09 Sep 2005 16:53:56 -0000 From: Brent Cash Subject: Re: Kenny Shepard sings Van McCoy Robert Indart wrote: > I was just wondering if Kenny Shepard's "Try To Understand" on the > Maxx label, in 1964 was ever released on CD it was written by Van > Mccoy. If not can it be posted on musica. To my understanding Kenny > Shepard recorded as Kenny Young in 1969 on the Share label with > another Van Mccoy song. This information I got on the Kenny Young > article on Spectropop website. Thanks! Hi Robert, Martin Roberts turned me onto some Kenny Shepherd stuff on Kapp awhile back (released a couple of years after the Maxx single you refer to, approx.'66), so maybe he knows the story on "Try To Understand" as well. Thanks for checking out the article. Best Wishes, Brent Cash -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 15 Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2005 10:11:25 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: Re: Shelby Flint Previously: > I always loved Shelby (Flint)'s "Angel On My Shoulder" and "Cast > Your Fate To The Wind" And I'll add "I Will Love You." gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 16 Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2005 11:37:35 -0700 (PDT) From: Stefano Boni Subject: Re: The Victorians Ian Slater wrote: > Further to previous discussion, I've played (the Victorians') > "Monkey Stroll" to musica. Enjoy! Thanks for posting that, Ian. It's an interesting track. Is there any chance that someone might have, and can post their tracks: "Happy Birthday Blue" and "If I Loved You"? Stefano -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 17 Date: Fri, 09 Sep 2005 18:51:17 +0100 From: Simon White Subject: Re: 'He Don't Really Love You' Hans Huss wrote (amongst other things): > 'He Don't Really Love You' (Moon Shot 6703) was the Delfonics' > first record, recorded in late 1966, released in early 1967. There is another version of the song, unreleased I believe (maybe Hans knows different?) without the very heavy kettle drum sound that features so prominently on the Moonshot version. I will do a comparison when I get a minute to get the 45 out of the cupboard, but I think the vocal track is different too. I suspect the song was actually recorded for Cameo/Parkway but the label went down before it was released. The version without the drum may be the one that Cameo didn't release and it was later 'beefed up' for the Moonshot release. Forgive me if this information is freely available elsewhere, but I suspect a number of 45s that appeared around this time were originally slotted for Cameo/Parkway release (maybe this is documented somewhere?) but again didn't get the chance, which might explain the one-off Intruders 45 on Excel for instance (the label that basically became "Gamble") and releases on labels like Fairmount, Winchester and Liberty Bell. I'm currently giving myself a headache trying to thread through all the Philly connections with Gamble and Huff, Thom Bell, Stan Watson, Billy Jackson, Jimmy Wisner et al. What a supremely gifted and talented group of people. Simon White ----------- Arthur's Northern Soul: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/arthurs Homepage: http://uk.geocities.com/poor.dog@btopenworld.com/index.html -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 18 Date: Fri, 09 Sep 2005 18:23:53 -0000 From: Joop Subject: Re: Ventures Gary Myers wrote: > To me, the most notable omission in the RnRHOF is the Ventures! > "Walk Don't Run" influenced every young drummer and guitarist at > that time, and for years many young bands tried to sound like the > Ventures. I believe they are the biggest selling guitar-based r'n'r > instrumental group ever. Dennis Hoban wrote: > Amen to that, Gary. My uncle's guitar teacher was Nokie Edwards of > The Ventures. I have his solo album, "Nokie!" My uncle was MY first > guitar teacher. Which makes me, in a weird way, Nokie's guitar > grandson. The Ventures deserve enlistment in the Hall of Fame. Any > way we could influence the Board of Directors? The Ventures had been listening to the records of Chet Atkins and came across "Walk don't run", but Chet on his turn had listened closely to Johnny Smith's original version of the song. http://www.originals.be/eng/main.cfm?c=t_upd_show&id=6667 Joop greets -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 19 Date: Fri, 9 Sep 2005 14:54:08 -0400 From: Roger Smith Subject: Re: Tin Pan Alley Previously: > Tin Pan Alley (tin pan AL-ee) noun. Popular music industry; > composers, songwriters, and music publishers considered > collectively. [After West 28th Street in New York City where music > publishers were formerly centered. From the cacophony of cheap > pianos and hack musicians the area came to be known as Tin Pan > Alley (apparently from the term tinny piano) and eventually became > generalized to refer to the whole music industry. The term, popular > in the past, is less used today.] Harry Von Tilzer ("I Want A Girl Just Like The Girl Who Married Dear Old Dad") is said to have inspired the name by putting pieces of paper between the strings of his piano to get a "tinny" sound he liked. The sound of Von Tilzer's piano inspired songwriter Monroe Rosenfeld to write a song called "Tin Pan Alley." -- Roger -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 20 Date: Fri, 09 Sep 2005 20:06:27 -0000 From: Joop Subject: Re: "What Makes Little Girls Cry" Julio Niño wrote: > And finally, thanks also to Ian Slater for posting the Victorians´ > "Monkey Stroll". I wasn´t familliar with it, and I think that, with > "What Makes The Little Girls Cry" (which I first discovered, being > a kid in bad company, now I´m just bad company, in the ultra- > accelerated version of a Spanish punk combo) is my favorite song by > them. By The Way, talking about "What Makes Little Girls Cry?". > French singer Marie Laforêt , recorded in 1963 a marvelous song > entitled "Qu´Est Ce Qui fait pleurer Les Filles?", a version of a > Crewe-Gaudio song titled precisely "What Makes Little Girls Cry?". > Could anybody please tell me who recorded the original version of > that song? As the copyrightyear of the song is 1963 http://www.semi-meridian.fr/oeuvres.php?OEU=71668 I think the Shepherd Sisters released the original version of the song on Atlantic 2176 in early 1963. The Victorians' song was composed by Lou Josie. By the way Julio there is a version recorded by this Spanish actress Soledad Miranda. Listen to a sample of her version here: http://www.amybrown.net/miranda/records.html Joop greets -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 21 Date: Fri, 09 Sep 2005 20:45:39 +0100 From: Simon White Subject: Re: Slippin' and Slidin' Country Paul wrote: > I don't remember if it was "Slippin' and Slidin'" or "Lucille" by > Little Richard which was about 1:20 in its original; some judicious > splicing stretched it out to about two minutes. How did I miss this one? My eyes are trained to spot the word "Little" and the name "Richard" even if they appear on the same page up to twenty two lines apart. You may be thinking of "Keep a Knockin'", which is spliced from a short radio station recording (with a line "I'm drinking gin and you can't come in" removed) or "Jenny Jenny" which (from memory) is two takes spliced together. There maybe another but I'm pretty sure it's not "Slippin' and Slidin'", which certainly exists in earlier less Little Richard-styled takes by the man himself and in different and earlier forms by Eddie Bo and Al Collins. Incidentally, and tying up two threads, I have here a 45 of The Carroll Brothers doing 'Slippin' and Slidding' (sic) on Cameo 213 from 1962. It's a white label DJ copy. My question to members is: Who were the Carroll Brothers and why would Cameo release this awful 45? It appears to be live (to an audience of about say, three) and the lead Carroll mangles the words all over the place. And I know Mr Penniman isn't always the easiest to understand but did the lead Carrroll brother really think Richard sang "Oh mama Linda, She's a silly sender, Oh you better remember"? It is really a very poor affair indeed. The official 'A' Side is a version of "Bo Diddley", which is so pointless as to not warrant mention at all. The released 45 seems to have 'Don't Knock The Twist" as the 'B' side. This demo is obviously worth at least three figures to collectors of dreck so I'm open to offers (this is British irony by the way). Much better is "Slipping and Sliding" by Spic & Span on V Tone from 1961, which is in a rough Everly Brothers style. Are we allowed to mention the Everlys here? I love "Price Of Love" and "Ferris Wheel" and their version of "Lucille" is one of the few covers versions of Little Richards material I can bear to hear. Holy Mackerel! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 22 Date: Sat, 10 Sep 2005 05:50:49 -0000 From: Fred Clemens Subject: Re: Royalties to the right people I can say (with some authority) that Miriam Makeba wasn't the first to credit "Linda" as composer. The Kingston Trio gave Linda credit in 1959, along with "P. Campbell" (which was a ficticious name for the Weavers). Initially, the Tokens only gave credit to Creatore, Peretti, and Weiss. When their RCA (LION SLEEPS TONIGHT) lp was issued, another name was added, A. Stanton. Campbell's name never appeared until much later. When I spoke with Phil Margo last year, he mentioned that the Tokens made much contribution to the making of their song but were never credited. It can be noted here that "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" wasn't the first version of the Linda song to contain the almost exclusive "Wimoweh" chant. The Kingston Trio's 1959 recording gave a translation to the true meaning of the song prefacing their singing of the tune. In 1960, two separate (English language) versions were recorded that contained words. The Randy Sparks Three (an early incarnation of the New Christy Minstrels) gave words in their alternately titled "Eh Wimoweh" (that sounds familiar!). The one-time lyric: "Lion come creepin' through the long tall grass, as I was strollin' one day, I say Mr. Lion please let me pass, don't you do me no harm, eh- wimoweh!". It even included a lion's growl during the opening of the song. The other happened in October, 1960 (almost a full year before the Tokens would record their version), when Kitty White introduced her own version as "Wimoweh (The Lion Sleeps)". Her words, however, had nothing to do with a sleeping lion (as one might expect from the title). She chose rather to sing about a tribute for the love of her man (she did sing "wimoweh" as part of her lyric). Fred Clemens http://www.bobshannon.com/fred/Mbube%20Listing.html -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 23 Date: Sat, 10 Sep 2005 04:02:21 -0000 From: Michael Subject: Epic 'Memory Lane' 45s Does anyone know approximately (or precisely, if you know) when Epic Records began and discontinued their 'Memory Lane' series of 45s... the blue labels with the flower petals? I once bought a Gerry and the Pacemakers album at a flea market, and I didn't know until I got home that tucked inside the cover (in addition to the Pacemakers LP) was a Dave Clark Five 'Memory Lane' 45 of "Because" and "Do You Love Me." I'm curious when this was issued/ sold...but I'm curious about the series in general. Thanks. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 24 Date: Sat, 10 Sep 2005 02:25:31 -0000 From: Mark Frumento Subject: Ray Singer & Johnny Arthey I was listening to Phil's Spectre II and some of the Righteous Brothers' knock-offs reminded me of a 45 I have by an act called Jon- Plum. They only recorded two 45s and the one I have 'You Keep Changing Your Mind' (SNB, 1969) is a wonderful Spector-a-like produced by Ray Singer (listening to it makes me think that he picked up a trick or two from his first producer Mark Wirtz). Musical direction on the record was by Johnny Arthey (who did nice work with The Angelettes etc). I'm wondering if anyone else has other records by the combination of these two men? or information about their work together? I'm mostly curious if either of them worked on other records in the Spectropop spirit. I'll play 'You Keep Changing Your Mind' to musica when there is space. Mark F. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 25 Date: Fri, 09 Sep 2005 19:29:17 -0000 From: Phil Hall Subject: "Mbube" Phil Chapman wrote: > "The Lion", pronounced Uyimbube I work with a lady from Africa who speaks Zulu, and she assures me that "Mbube" translates as "corn meal" or "land". Maybe it's a dialect thing. Phil H. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- SPECTROPOP features: http://www.spectropop.com End

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