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Spectropop - Digest Number 2041



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 14 messages in this issue.


Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Shirley Goodman of Shirley & Lee and Shirley & Co.
           From: Mike Rashkow 
      2. Re: The Duchess, guitarist with Bo Diddley
           From: Phil Milstein 
      3. Re: Shirley Goodman, R.I.P.
           From: Eddy 
      4. Re: Shirley Goodman, R.I.P.
           From: Joop 
      5. Re: the Pleasure Seekers
           From: Mick Patrick 
      6. Re: Carpenters solo
           From: Various 
      7. Re: Shirley Goodman, R.I.P.
           From: Simon White 
      8. Bacharach & David's "Knowing When To Leave"
           From: Richard Havers 
      9. Re: Shirley Goodman, R.I.P.
           From: Hans Huss 
     10. Re: John Carter song - Midnight Girl
           From: Mark Frumento 
     11. Who played what on the Carpenters disc.
           From: Steve Harvey 
     12. Re: Bacharach & David's "Knowing When To Leave"
           From: Mick Patrick 
     13. Re: Coke jingles in musica
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     14. Re: Dolly Parton Gets Retro With Cover Tunes
           From: Joop 


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Message: 1 Date: Tue, 23 Aug 2005 20:51:41 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Shirley Goodman of Shirley & Lee and Shirley & Co. The S'pop Team wrote: > Sad to report that Shirley Goodman - of Shirley & Lee and, two > decades later, Shirley & Co - passed away on June 19th. An obituary > has been added to the S'pop Remembers section: > http://www.spectropop.com/remembers/SGobit.htm > > In her honour, a version of "Oh Baby (We Got A Good Thing Going)", > recorded by Shirley & Jessie (Jessie Hill) for Wand in 1966, is now > playing at musica: > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ > > Please enjoy and, by all means, discuss. > > Shirley Goodman, R.I.P. One of the first recordings that captured my attention was the little- known "I'm Gone" by Shirley & Lee. It was on Alladin. How long ago was that? I had a 78 -- and baby that was all there was. I think RCA was the only label releasing 45s at the time (circa 1953). This site has some info: http://www.duvigneaud.net/Shirley_Lee.html Another under-appreciated talent. She sang background on a number of Dr. John recordings. RIP Rashkovksy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 2 Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2005 11:21:39 -0400 From: Phil Milstein Subject: Re: The Duchess, guitarist with Bo Diddley The S'pop Team wrote: > Sad to report that Norma-Jean Wofford, aka The Duchess, guitarist > with Bo Diddley's band from 1962 to 1966, passed away on April > 30th. An obituary has been posted to the S'pop Remembers section: > http://www.spectropop.com/remembers/DuchessObit.htm > > In tribute to Norma-Jean, "Hey Bo Diddley", a live performance from > the 1966 movie The Big TNT Show, is now playing at musica: > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ > > Please enjoy and, by all means, discuss. > > The Duchess, R.I.P. Jack Russell: > I saw the Duchess with Bo Diddley on an Everly Brothers tour, I > think it was the tour when Don quit halfway through. Little Richard > was on the bill, with the Rolling Stones closing the first half! I never had the pleasure, alas. I think the Duchess and, later, Lady Bo helped keep Bo honest onstage. From videos I've seen, his appearances with either of his two female guitarists in his band were incredibly dynamic and tight, whereas left to his devices otherwise his shows have often lapsed into meandering blues, a style at which Bo is utterly undistinguished. Another thought: no Duchess, no Poison Ivy of The Cramps. Ivy (aka Ivy Rorshach) might not have copped every guitar lick she knows from the Duchess, but her stage moves and dress style were the stagecraft equivalent of a note-for-note cover version. Dig, --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 3 Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2005 17:22:49 +0200 From: Eddy Subject: Re: Shirley Goodman, R.I.P. The S'pop Team wrote: > Sad to report that Shirley Goodman - of Shirley & Lee and, two > decades later, Shirley & Co - passed away on June 19th. An obituary > has been added to the S'pop Remembers section: > http://www.spectropop.com/remembers/SGobit.htm > > In her honour, a version of "Oh Baby (We Got A Good Thing Going)", > recorded by Shirley & Jessie (Jessie Hill) for Wand in 1966, is now > playing at musica: > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ > > Please enjoy and, by all means, discuss. > > Shirley Goodman, R.I.P. Phil X Milstein: > I LOVE the Shirley & Jessie version of "Oh Baby (We Got A Good > Thing Going)," now playing in musica. Shirley had a unique voice, > but at times, especially on the upbeat material, she could really > wail. The only other version of the song I'm familiar with is the > Stones's, from their "Out Of Our Heads (And Everybody's)" LP (some > versions of it, at least). I'm curious to know who wrote the song, > and who cut it first? Also, is Jessie Jessie Hill, of "Ooh Poo Pah > Do, Pt. 2" fame? Phil, "Oh baby ... " is credited to a certain Ozen, aka Barbara Lynn, who recorded the original version. Jessie is indeed Jessie Hill. He had already been working with Shirley Goodman on Dr John's Gris Gris album and both were in his live band The Nighttrippers. Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 4 Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2005 18:13:15 -0000 From: Joop Subject: Re: Shirley Goodman, R.I.P. Phil X Milstein wrote: > I LOVE the Shirley & Jessie version of "Oh Baby (We Got A Good > Thing Going)," now playing in musica. Shirley had a unique voice, > but at times, especially on the upbeat material, she could really > wail. The only other version of the song I'm familiar with is the > Stones's, from their "Out Of Our Heads (And Everybody's)" LP (some > versions of it, at least). I'm curious to know who wrote the song, > and who cut it first? Also, is Jessie Jessie Hill, of "Ooh Poo Pah > Do, Pt. 2" fame? Phil, "Oh Baby (We Got A Good Thing Going)" was written by Barbara Lynn Ozen and she recorded her original version in 1964 on Jamie 1277. http://www.soulfulkindamusic.net/blynn.htm http://nothinbutdablues.bizland.com/SpotlightDecember.chtml According to the great book "The Originals" by Arnold Rypens there were coverversions by: -Rolling Stones (1965) -Astronauts (1966) -Nightcrawlers (1967) -Clydie King (1968) -The Blazers (1997) -Bill Wyman's Rhythm Kings (2000) -Sue Foley (2000) Joop greets -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 5 Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2005 19:39:45 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: the Pleasure Seekers Me, on: > ... The Pleasure Seekers "If You Climb On The Tiger's Back" b/w > "Theme From The Valley Of The Dolls", released on Capitol 2050 > in 1967. Are either of these tracks out on CD? Harvey Williams: > ... I have the 45 and can play it to Musica if no-one else has > the inclination. Incidentally, I was under the impression that > this band was a different Pleasure Seekers to the act who recorded > for Mercury & Hideout (and featured Suzi Quatro) ... Yes please Harvey, I'd love to hear both sides, as would the rest of us, I reckon. Nothing I've ever read about Suzi Quatro has mentioned this 45, so I guess you're probably correct about it being a different group. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 6 Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2005 11:28:46 -0400 From: Various Subject: Re: Carpenters solo One question, several answers, all the same. No more per-lease: ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Rashkovsky: > Does anyone out there in wonderland know who played the guitar solo > on the fade of The Carpenter's "Goodbye To Love"? I know that's a > pretty esoteric question, but that solo has always knocked me out. Tony Peluso? Lloyd Davis ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Agreed! Richard "If I Were A" Carpenter answers Rashkow at: http://www.richardandkarencarpenter.com/Album_ASongForYou.htm --Phil M. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Great record and great guitar. At the time I heard it was Dean Parks, but I've since heard it was their regular touring guy, Tony Peluso, and I believe Richard confirmed that on a PBS show. gem ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Actually, that fabulous solo is by Tony Peluso, longtime guitarist on Carpenters recordings...funny, when that song was released, there was a HUGE backlash from long-time Carpenters fans about that solo, claiming that Karen and Richard had gone "hard rock"... Always spectropopping along, Tracy Pernell ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Liner notes for the gold disc CD "Original Master Recording" release of the LP 'A Song For You' state that Tony Peluso played the guitar solo on this track. Richard says that Tony caught his ear when playing in a group called Instant Joy which backed Mark Lindsay when he opened for the Carpenters in 1971. Tony Peluso was also the voice of the DJ in the oldies medley on their 'Now And Then' LP. Antone ---------------------------------------------------------------------- It's in fact Tony Peluso, former leader of the Abstracts. Here from Richard Carpenter site: http://www.richardandkarencarpenter.com/SN_GoodbyeToLove.htm "I wrote most of this melody while visiting London in 1971. As it is chromatic in places, and employs lengthy phrases at times, it is quite difficult to sing correctly. Karen, as always, performs it both beautifully and effortlessly. While constructing the arrangement, I pictured a melodic fuzz guitar solo, and knew just the guitarist I wanted to employTony Peluso. Karen and I had met Tony in 1971 when his band, Instant Joy, had backed Mark Lindsay, who had opened for us on our spring tour. The resulting guitar solo is, in my opinion, one of the best in recording history. Goodbye To Love went Top 10, but did provoke some hate mail from people who claimed we had sold out, and gone HARD ROCK!!!" Tony Peluso also played the wonderful guitar part on Barbara Keith cover of "All Along The Watchtower". Stephane ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Tony Peluso. Richard Havers ---------------------------------------------------------------------- On the DVD "The Carpenters --- Close to You," guitarist Tony Peluso talks about how he was encouraged to play his over-the-top solo by Richard Carpenter. He contends that this was the first time---but not by a long shot---the last that this kind of solo was ever heard in the context of what Peluso terms a "power ballad." More suitable, perhaps, to an AC/DC track? Carpenter recalls on the DVD that he was inspired to write the song, with John Bettis, after seeing a '30s Bing Crosby movie, "Rhythm on the River," in which a "great" song with the title "Goodbye to Love" is mentioned throughout the film, but is never actually heard. "Hmmm," thought Carpenter, "that's a good title. I think I'll write a song to go with it." Carpenter also said that even though "Goodbye to Love" charted Top Ten, some fans were alienated by Peluso's solo and wrote letters to the effect that the Carpenters had sold out. Then there were those others who felt that the Carpenters, myself not among them, were nothing but sell-outs in the first place. Bill Reed ---------------------------------------------------------------------- According to Richard Carpenter the guitar player for that blistering solo was Tony Peluso. To quote Richard: "While constructing the arrangement, I "heard" a melodic fuzz guitar solo and knew just the guitarist I wanted to employ: Tony Peluso. Karen and I met Tony in 1971 when his band "Instant Joy" had backed Mark Lindsay, who had opened for us on one of our tours. The resulting guitar solo is, in my opinion, one of the best in recording history." Bob Wallis ---------------------------------------------------------------------- That great guitar-solo was played by Tony Peloso. http://www.vex.net/~paulmac/carpenter/albums/a_song_for_you_lp.html Great guitar-solo indeed Rashkovsky, but what do you think of the "Intermission" closing theme that follows it. Great "tongue-in-cheek" close-harmony. Joop greets ---------------------------------------------------------------------- This must be Tony Peluso. In the brilliant Carpenters DVD "Close To You - Remembering the Carpenters" he talks about how he "invented" the guitar solo in Power Ballads with this song. Nice guy and an extraordinary solo. Frank J. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 7 Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2005 22:43:30 +0100 From: Simon White Subject: Re: Shirley Goodman, R.I.P. I was very sad to hear of Shirley's death. I love the Shirley and Lee records. Shirley's "Sarah Vaughn on helium" voice was always good value. There's a re-recording of "Let The Good Times Roll" on Warwick which is deeply eccentric and it's mainly down to Shirley's voice. Her version of "When I Fall In Love" is extraordinary. The duets throughout the Sixties all have a great naive quality - the Shirley and Jessie (Hill) 45 on Wand is great. Her version of "Sugar Sugar" is another oddity worth seeking out. "Shame Shame Shame' is one of the greatest dance records of the 70's. Anyone who made great records in three decades deserves our attention. Shirley Goodman, R.I.P. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 8 Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2005 22:25:27 +0100 From: Richard Havers Subject: Bacharach & David's "Knowing When To Leave" Joop wrote: > Great guitar-solo indeed Rashkovsky, but what do you think of the > "Intermission" closing theme that follows it. Great "tongue-in- > cheek" close-harmony. Joop, I love it! The Carpenters threw in a number of those little close harmony fillers on their albums, going right back to the first in 1969 with the beautiful 'Invocation' and 'Benediction'. 'Invocation' is very reminiscent of the Beach Boys' 'Our Prayer'. There's the lovely reprise of 'Yesterday Once More' on 'The Carpenters -Now & Then', which always strikes me as a great little theme for what most of us in this group talk about. "When I was young I'd listen to the radio.....so fine....so fine" For my money their cover version of 'Ticket To Ride' is one of the best Beatle covers. Creatively it seems to offer a whole lot more than most covers do. Question. The Carpenters Bacharach & David medley (on their 1971 album The Carpenters) starts with 'Knowing When To Leave.' Did the Carpenters version predate Hugo Montenegro's version, and does anyone know who the vocalists were on the latter's rendition? Who, if it wasn't either of these two, did the first version? Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 9 Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2005 14:58:11 -0700 (PDT) From: Hans Huss Subject: Re: Shirley Goodman, R.I.P. Phil X Milstein wrote: > The only other version of 'Oh Baby (We Got A Good Thing Goin''] I'm > familiar with is the Stones's Speaking of Shirley Goodman and the Rolling Stones, it's interesting to note that the Stones cut Shirley & Company's 'Shame, Shame, Shame' whilst recording the Black & Blue album in 1975. Never released, except in bootleg form, the track features Billy Preston on keyboards. (The Stones have played Jimmy Reed's 'Shame Shame Shame', too, at least live, but that's a different story.) Although credited to Sylvia Robinson, Donnie Elbert always claimed he wrote the song. Elbert ended up releasing his own (slower) version, 'You're Gonna Cry When I'm Gone' (on the Bradleys label in the UK), which is worth trying to find. Haven't heard the Stones' version myself - it's on a bootleg called "Jeff Beck: Jamming with the Rolling Stones", which should be out there somewhere - but no doubt it sounds fine next to 'Hot Stuff' and 'Fool To Cry'... In any case, Shirley Goodman's version is a classic, albeit an unsung one. Hasse Huss -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 10 Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2005 22:32:12 -0000 From: Mark Frumento Subject: Re: John Carter song - Midnight Girl Roberto wrote: > The recent messages about John Carter sent me browsing among my > records, where I found an Italian version of a nice if > unexceptional Carter-Stephens song called Midnight Girl. The > original came out in 1966 in England, and was sung by one Paul > Craig, of whom I know nothing. I googled a bit but it seemms > there's nothing about him, not even a record for sale or a > compilation including this song. Can anybody help me with some info > (and maybe an mp3)? I played the track to musica. Sadly Craig's version isn't all that good either. The original John Carter demo is done in an acousitc, folky style - much more appropriate than the released versions. In fact, when I heard the original I thought it sounded a lot like a P.F. Sloan song. Searching "Midnight Girl with "Paul Craig" there is a site that lists it as a P.F. Sloan cover! So I guess I'm not alone in my thinking. Hopefully Carter's version gets released in the future because it's far superior and a real treat especially if you are a P.F. Sloan fan. But, after all of my blather, I can't help you with Paul Craig. Sorry. Mark F. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 11 Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2005 19:39:02 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Who played what on the Carpenters disc. Now we know about the guitar solo, but how many know that Karen was the bassist on several cuts on their first album, Offering? Through that website Richard answered my question as to what type of bass (a knockoff of Macca's Hofner which Joe Olson gave her when they were recording the Magic Lamp sides in his garage). He also mentioned hearing the Wildweeds' "And When She Smiles" on the radio in the early 70s while traveling to gigs. I always thought it was because they both came from the same state. Steve Harvey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 12 Date: Thu, 25 Aug 2005 08:32:21 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Bacharach & David's "Knowing When To Leave" Richard Havers: > The Carpenters Bacharach & David medley (on their 1971 album > The Carpenters) starts with 'Knowing When To Leave.' Did the > Carpenters version predate Hugo Montenegro's version, and does > anyone know who the vocalists were on the latter's rendition? > Who, if it wasn't either of these two, did the first version? The original version of "Knowing When To Leave" was by Jill O'Hara, released in 1968 on the original cast album of "Promises, Promises" (United Artists UAS 9902), Bacharach & David's Broadway musical based on the movie The Apartment. The Hugo Montenegro version was also from 1968, three years before the Carpenters. Pardon me if this question has previously been asked and answered, but is the "Promises, Promises" original cast LP available on CD? If not, why not? While I'm on a Burt'n'Hal kick, might I recommend Serene Dominic's marvellous book, "Burt Bacharach: Song By Song", published by Schirmer in 2003. This tome is written in a fabulously witty style, yet is one of the best music reference books I have ever come across. It's available for peanuts on Amazon. Serene Dominic looks remarkably like Tony Hatch. Why I mention this fact, I'm unsure. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 13 Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2005 11:25:01 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Coke jingles in musica Julio: > Could the voice making the speech at the end of the tracks be Jeff > Barry's? No--that's one of the then top DJ's in New York---if only I hadn't lost my memory, I could tell you his name. Di la, Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 14 Date: Wed, 24 Aug 2005 18:57:02 -0000 From: Joop Subject: Re: Dolly Parton Gets Retro With Cover Tunes Phil, Mary Hopkin lends a hand on the title-track of "Those were the days" by Dolly Parton as she is probably most associated with that song. But the origins of it lie in Russia where it is performed in 1926 by Alexander Vertinsky with it's original title "DAROGAI DLI MAYOU". http://www.originals.be/eng/main.cfm?c=t_upd_show&id=1257 Joop greets -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop! End

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