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Spectropop - Digest Number 2021



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 16 messages in this issue.


Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Larry Weiss songs for Ruby & the Romantics
           From: Joop 
      2. Re: "Dark End Of The Street"
           From: Dave Heasman 
      3. Re: Larry Weiss 1974 album
           From: Nick Archer 
      4. Re: Little Milton -- the man and the place
           From: Norm D. Plume 
      5. Re: "Dark End Of The Street"
           From: Jim Kauffman 
      6. April March
           From: Ed 
      7. Billie Davis sings Carter-Lewis
           From: Mick Patrick 
      8. That Thing You Do 45
           From: Jim Fisher 
      9. Re: That Thing You Do 45
           From: Joe Nelson 
     10. The Gleams' "Mr. Magic Moon" now playing
           From: David A Young 
     11. Re: "Dark End Of The Street"
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     12. Re: Unknown group
           From: Bill Reed 
     13. Re: "Dark End Of The Street"
           From: Hans Huss 
     14. G-L-O-R-I-A
           From: Various 
     15. Zombies
           From: Various 
     16. Jigsaw
           From: Various 


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Message: 1 Date: Sat, 06 Aug 2005 16:04:06 -0000 From: Joop Subject: Re: Larry Weiss songs for Ruby & the Romantics Mick Patrick on the songs of Larry Weiss: > Wow, one of the S'pop era's top songwriters at hand to answer > questions! How fantastic! Thanks Ed. Might it be possible for you > to ask Larry what he recalls about two of my favourites of his > compositions, "Your Baby Doesn't Love You Anymore" and "Does He > Really Care For Me", both cut by the wonderful Ruby & the Romantics > for Kapp Records with Tom Catalano producing and Alan Lorber > arranging - magnificent records, each. I'd post them to musica, but > they're both available on CD. Was Larry present at the sessions? If > so, what studio was used? And who was the engineer? Did he write > the songs for any specific artist? They would both have been great > for the Righteous Brothers, although Ruby & the Romantics' versions > would take some beating, even with Phil Spector at the controls. > What are Larry's thoughts on producer Tom Catalano? And arranger > Alan Lorber? Thanks in advance. "Your Baby Doesn't Love You Anymore" would be have been great for the Righteous Brothers indeed. Karen Carpenter recorded a cover- version for a planned solo-album, which never saw the light of the day (it was released 1983 posthumous). Some other Larry Weiss-compositions I discovered: -"Getting ready for the heartbreak" (co-composed with Lockie Edwards Jr) recorded by Chuck Jackson in 1962 and covered by Dionne Warwick in 1964 and Oscar Toney Jr in 1967. -"Mr Wishing Well" (co-composed with Lockie Edwards Jr) recorded by Nat King Cole in 1963. And in message # 30609 I already mentioned "Mr Dream Merchant". I forgot to say that this Larry Weiss /Jerry Ross song was also covered by New Birth in 1975 as "Dream Merchant" and it became a Nr 1 R&B Hit in the US. In message # 30609 I also mentioned that Larry recorded an album in 1974 for the 20th Century-label. And in the credits: Strings and horns arranged by Jimmie Haskell. And Jimmie plays accordion and moog on the album. As I said on this album is the original version of "Rhinestone Cowboy". Another song from this album was "Lay me down (roll me out to the sea)" which was covered by Denny Doherty in 1974 and by Barry Manilow in 1975. In 1976 it was covered by Glen Campbell and also by Anne Murray. Larry Weiss needs an article in Spectropop. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 2 Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2005 16:18:18 +0100 From: Dave Heasman Subject: Re: "Dark End Of The Street" Richard Havers wrote: > "Everybody keeps asking me what's my favourite version of 'Dark End > of The Street' as if there's any other than James Carr." said Dan > Penn... DJ Jimmy B: > ... the 80's Boston band called The Pixies, who are now on a sort > of comeback tour, their lead singer Frank Black has recently > released a solo LP on which he does a creditabe cover of "Dark End > Of The Street". Don't forget Clarence Carter's version with the > spoken bit at the beginning either. The first ever version I heard was the Burritos'. Obviously a great song, but Parsons loaded it with self-pity rather than Carr's despair. I prefer Milton's version because it adds intelligence - "this is how the world is, full of people meeting in secret, I guess we'll deal with it". I haven't heard Clarence Carter's version; I think he could do a credible personal job of it. They're gonna find us... watching the cricket. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 3 Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2005 11:31:15 -0500 From: Nick Archer Subject: Re: Larry Weiss 1974 album Joop wrote: > In message # 30609 I also mentioned that Larry recorded an album in > 1974 for the 20th Century-label. And in the credits: Strings and > horns arranged by Jimmie Haskell. And Jimmie plays accordion and > moog on the album. Larry has given me a CD copy of this album from the master tapes. I can post to musica if there's a cut of particular interest. Nick Archer Franklin, TN Listen to Nashville's classic pop and soft rock station SM95 at http://www.live365.com/stations/nikarcher -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 4 Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2005 10:40:03 -0700 (PDT) From: Norm D. Plume Subject: Re: Little Milton -- the man and the place I wrote earlier: > Are there any UK S'Poppers who live in Oxfordshire? If so, you'll > probably know there's a small village there called Little Milton. > I wonder if any of the inhabitants - or the man himself - knew of > the connection. Answering my own posts, how sad is that. I'll be talking to myself next (no you won't). There's a good obit of Little Milton in today's UK daily, The Guardian: http://tinyurl.com/7zssy The newspaper has a splendid picture of him. The obit mentions that one of his recent albums was called "Welcome To Little Milton" with a picture of the village sign, so he must have known of the presence of this Oxon location. Norm D. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 5 Date: Sat, 06 Aug 2005 15:32:07 -0400 From: Jim Kauffman Subject: Re: "Dark End Of The Street" Richard & Linda Thompson do a version, too, as does Aretha Franklin I believe, but I've got to go with the man whut wrote it--James Carr OWNS that song. Jim K. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 6 Date: Sat, 06 Aug 2005 20:20:09 -0000 From: Ed Subject: April March Dave Monroe: > For the record, the very wonderful April March, Spumco ("Ren & > Stimpy") animator and presnet-day US ye-ye girl extraodinaire, > recorded a burning cover of GH's "Tu Mens."... Her translation of > the Gainsbourg-penned France Gall classic "Laissez tomber les > filles" as "Chick Habit" is nothing short of genius, pop musical or > otherwise. Thanks for the info! S'poppers may also be interested to know that a downloadable mp3 of April's "Chick Habit" is open to the public at http://www.epitonic.com/artists/aprilmarch.html Ed -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 7 Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2005 22:18:01 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Billie Davis sings Carter-Lewis Mark Frumento wrote: > In honor of the mention of John (Carter) and Ken (Lewis) I've > posted a nice unreleased version of "Thank You Boy" to musica. The > released version by Dana Gillespie ended up with a folkie sound, > but the demo is decidedly Spectorish. Check it out. Cool track. I prefer it to the released version too. But who is it singing, any idea? I was expecting it to be Val McKenna, but I can't make up my mind if it's her, Dana G or some other gal. Talking of Carter-Lewis demos . . . I've posted to musica another acetate of one of their songs. From the collection of my pal Clunkie, "Sweet And Tender Romance" features young Billie Davis at her most raw. It sounds like one of her earliest recordings. Some of you might know the song by Carter-Lewis & the Southerners, John Leyton, the McKinleys or P. J. Proby. Find it here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 8 Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2005 14:18:48 -0700 From: Jim Fisher Subject: That Thing You Do 45 I bought three 45s at a garage sale this morning that will interest enthusiasts of the above movie...they were used somewhere in the flick (I didn't actually see it) as props and are authentic looking 45s from that time ( "Copyright 1964 Play Tone" it says) but are really dummies with the Play-Tone label stuck over random vinyl, the recordings on each of the discs are all different from each other, a mix of heavy metal, country, though the labels are the same on all. Two of them are EPs. Along the bottom of the disc is the "address" of Play-Tone Records..given as 93749 Sunset Blvd...if you're in the 93 thousand block of Sunset then you'd better be a damn good swimmer, you'd be half way to Hawaii. Anyway I've put a link here to scans I made of the 45s, let me know if anyone wants a higher- resolution version. (I think that Play Tone might be an actual record company?? Connected to Steven Spielberg? Tom Hanks?) Jim http://www.pbase.com/jhfaust/inbox -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 9 Date: Sat, 06 Aug 2005 18:07:05 -0400 From: Joe Nelson Subject: Re: That Thing You Do 45 Jim Fisher: > I bought three 45s at a garage sale this morning that will interest > enthusiasts of the above movie...they were used somewhere in the > flick (I didn't actually see it) as props and are authentic looking > 45s from that time ( "Copyright 1964 Play Tone" it says) but are > really dummies with the Play-Tone label stuck over random vinyl, > the recordings on each of the discs are all different from each > other, a mix of heavy metal, country, though the labels are the > same on all. Two of them are EPs. Along the bottom of the disc is > the "address" of Play-Tone Records..given as 93749 Sunset Blvd... > if you're in the 93 thousand block of Sunset then you'd better be a > damn good swimmer, you'd be half way to Hawaii. Anyway I've put a > link here to scans I made of the 45s, let me know if anyone wants a > higher-resolution version. (I think that Play Tone might be an > actual record company?? Connected to Steven Spielberg? Tom Hanks?) What's interesting about these scans is that records from that period rarely listed copyright or publication dates on the labels. (The Cameo and Parkway labels were dated, but those dates were copyrights for the actual label designs and had nothing to do with what was in the grooves.) Copyright dates for the actual record didn't become common untill 1972. The Play-Tone label was created in conjunction with the film. Tom Hanks decided to use the same label to release the soundtrack CD, and has since used it on subsquent soundtracks for his films. Oddly, what Hanks DIDN'T do was to press the single on vinyl. Sale copies could have been used as props in the film (instead of the fakes Jim bought) and extras sold at retail (since the title track was released as a single). I remember looking for such a record at the time, partly to see if he'd "get it right" and press it in mono - just like in '64, eh? As it is, the mix sounds like the modern recording it is. Damn. Hanks put a lot of effort into the mood of the record (a couple of concert takes were ruined when audience members were seen giving each other high fives, unheard of in 1964) but couldn't be bothered to get that nice wide stereo picture that inherently goes with the three and four track recording technology of the time.... Just venting, I guess.. Joe Nelson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 10 Date: Sat, 06 Aug 2005 22:40:41 -0000 From: David A Young Subject: The Gleams' "Mr. Magic Moon" now playing Many thanks to Robbie for his recent post (number 30725 in case you missed it) connecting the dots from Originals to Valentinos to Gleams to Shantungs. I was very surprised to find out that "Mr. Magic Moon," which I've long loved by The Gleams, was by a real group with both a history preceding it and a further recording from the same period. I'd always assumed that The Gleams was a made-up name for a one-off studio aggregation since the flip side of the single, "Pile Driver" (credited to one C. B. Tranum but actually a blatant ripoff of "When Johnny Comes Marching Home"), is a Duane Eddy-style instrumental. The Gleams' version of the Greenwich-Powers tune is arranged and conducted by Jerry Ragovoy and produced by David Mook, and was Kapp's third-to-last single of 1963. The song was also recorded by The Kim Sisters on Monument (that label's first 45 of 1964) and in Japan by The Beni Sisters (thanks to Yoshinori Otake for turning me on to the latter version). Intriguingly, Silky and the Shantungs' "He's a Fink" was Musicor's final 1963 single, placing it very close in time, at least of its release, to the group's recording as The Gleams. All of this is particularly interesting when you consider that "Mr. Magic Moon" is basically a retooling of Bob B. Soxx and the Blue Jeans' "Why Do Lovers Break Each Other's Hearts," minus the Phil Spector songwriter credit, and also the fact that that song was Philles Records' *first* release of 1963. In other words, a year later, (at least) three other groups hoped you'd forget that hit and buy their record. The aural evidence is, per Robbie's request, now playing in musica. Anyone have the Originals/Valentinos songs? David A. Young -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 11 Date: Sat, 06 Aug 2005 23:20:51 -0400 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: "Dark End Of The Street" James Botticelli wrote: > If any Spectropoppers have heard of the 80's Boston band called The > Pixies, who are now on a sort of comeback tour, their lead singer > Frank Black has recently released a solo LP on which he does a > creditabe cover of "Dark End Of The Street". Which was produced, or at least engineered, by Dan Penn. Richard Havers wrote: > "Everybody keeps asking me what's my favourite version of 'Dark End > of The Street' as if there's any other than James Carr." said Dan > Penn ... Great quote! I was fortunate to have had Carr's as the first version I ever heard (on Rhino's excellent "Soul Shots" series), and while I've enjoyed many of the others, at the same time none of them have, in my book, come close to his. In fact, it remains my favorite soul ballad of them all. Dig, --Phil M. -- new at Probe: "Ernie T., phone home" i.e., huge batch of more weirdities http://www.philxmilstein.com/probe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 12 Date: Sun, 07 Aug 2005 06:18:06 -0000 From: Bill Reed Subject: Re: Unknown group Bryce Hesterman: > I have posted the shot to the S'pop photos section. Can anyone put > a name to the group for me please? The singer second from left is most likely the highly regarded vocal arranger and group singer Alan Copeland. He is well-known for having sung with the Modernaires since the early 1950s, and numerous other groups, including (natch) The Alan Copeland Singers. He is still active and has a web site: www.alancopeland.com. You might find some clues there and, perhaps, even send him an attachment of the pic. Probably one of the most widely heard voices in the history of recorded music. Like saxophonist Plas Johnson, Copeland is everywhere in the air. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 13 Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2005 15:58:47 -0700 (PDT) From: Hans Huss Subject: Re: "Dark End Of The Street" The largely unsung Willie Hobbs cut a fine version of 'At The Dark End Of The Street' for John Richbourg's Sound Stage 7 label in 1973 (Sound Stage 7 1510). Amazingly, Hobbs, who also recorded for Soft, Le Cam, Silver Fox, Seventy Seven and Bandit in the 60s and 70s, released his first album, "Out Of The Box", in 2003! Hasse Huss -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 14 Date: Thu, 04 Aug 2005 10:10:11 -0000 From: Various Subject: G-L-O-R-I-A Another batch of posts on the subject of "Gloria". Can we now consider this thread closed please? ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Them's Gloria ia fine example of British R'n'B whereas the SOK is a fine example of Garage. I imagine that Them used to play this in much "harder" style in live appearances, thats if they could get through a gig without beating each other up first. Lobby ---------------------------------------------------------------------- I imagine the Spectropop "keepers" will bring this dialogue to a quick conclusion. But given the vehemence of Bill Mulvy's comments, I have to speak up again for those of us on the West Coast -- and all who love THEM's music. John Berg ---------------------------------------------------------------------- I agree with Bill Mulvy. The Shadows of Knight version is devastatingly powerful, especially toward the end. When I first heard the other version (MUCH later), I thought "What the hell? Where did they dig up THIS record?" It sounded like mighty weak tea. Kudos for writing the song--it's a classic! One of the truly great compositions in the rock style. I'm tempted to say a work of genius. But when people turn on the radio, they can't HEAR who wrote the song. All they hear and respond to is the record. Rodney Rawlings ---------------------------------------------------------------------- I have to vote with the Shadows of Knight, too. Their version had the attitude, so much so that every local band had to have their version ready to play. Nick Archer ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Bill Mulvy wrote: > Scott, I beg to differ with your "Gloria" assessment. Hi, Bill, I will address these items individually. Remember that altho "Oh Yeah!" beats "Gloria" all to hell as far as Shadows of Knight songs go, I DO AGREE that the Shadows' "Gloria" is much better. Van's nasal version lacks a lot, but that's JUST ME! > 1.) Them's version wasn't even on the radar screen in Chicago. According to Clark Weber (WLS Music director), Dunwich's Bill Traut played the song for Clark and he said he just couldn't play it because of that one lyric. Bill said, "Will you play it if I change the line?" Clark said sure and soon he had the S of K version in his hands and it was on the air soon! So, even tho it did not make the survey by Them, it was the reason for the S of K recording. > 2.) Them's version was inferior to the SOH version. The garage rock > sound is what made the song and Them guys didn't have it. As I said above, I agree, but MANY people loved Them's version in 1965 well before Gloria was even a twinkle in Jimmy Sohns' eyes. > 3.) If Van Morrison hadn't been a successful solo artist, Them's > version of "Gloria" would not get much airplay now. Not sure about that. My charts DO show it was #1 in LA, Miami, Denver and many other outlets it was top 5. Billboard, IMO, REALLY screwed up charting this record! The only reasons "Gloria" by Them was NOT a huge hit was the lyrics holding it out of markets like Chicago AND that Them and their record label screwed its' chances. With the A side "Baby Please Don't Go" (a great Them song!) flopped in spring of 1965, many stations were getting requests for the B side "Gloria" and the record got flipped and soon the B side was literally leaping up charts. The problem was that when the A side flopped, Parrot readied "Here Comes The night" as a great followup. A week after "Gloria" charted on Billboard, "Here Comes the night" jumped on and quickly surpassed it. I gotta believe that stations who were leary of "Gloria" or were ready to add it, decided to go with the new A side, which in all honesty is far superior to Gloria by Them. Anyway, that is something to consider seriously. In the markets "Gloria" was top 10, Them had 2 hits and in some instances, "Gloria" stayed on long after "Night" dropped off! > 4.) The fact that Van Morrison wrote the song and Them recorded it > first, doesn't make it the better song or the more popular song. > Seems like the left coasters who have commented don't appreciate > one of the all time garage rock songs. Them, you gotta be kidding > me! Correct again, this does not mean Them's song is better because it was first. I think there is room for both songs to have separate appreciation. I still hear both and usually S of K more often. In this case, there are good reasons for both to get airplay! Clark Besch ---------------------------------------------------------------------- I personally have to agree with Bill, having grown up in Chicago back in the 60's. The SOK were one of the hottest bands going (Does anyone remember the "CAVE" in Arlington Heights, the SOK were regulars). Them never had a chance, at least during the Garage Band era. Max Weiner ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Question 1: Which version hit bigger on the "Right" Coast? Methinx SoK did pretty well about as far east as Pittsburgh and as far south as maybe Nashville or Atlanta. Question 2: Dare I mention The Blues Magoos' deranged version since as of Wed. night nobody else has? (rhetorical?) Question 3: Is it fair of me to suggest that even if SoK may not have been able to accurately rock "Gloria" in the same manner as Van & Them did, that they certainly compensated with "Oh Yeah" "I'll Make You Sorry" "Back Door Man" etc., and earned their place as one of the BEST garage groups ever to emerge out of the Midwest! Yeah yeah YEA-UH, Bobster ---------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 15 Date: Fri, 05 Aug 2005 10:08:20 -0400 From: Various Subject: Zombies Multiple posts on a singular subject: ---------------------------------------------------------------------- David Coyle wrote: > Who are the Zombies besides Colin and Rod? In my mind, it could be > anybody and I wouldn't care, but it'd be nice to see another > familiar face from British pop history. Playing bass is JIM RODFORD, Rod's cousin, as it happens; he was a founding member of ARGENT too; and he spent I think 20 years in THE KINKS (not an original member); he's also now playing with the SWINGIN BLUE JEANS replacing LES BRAID who passed away last month. Unsteady Freddie ---------------------------------------------------------------------- In addition...Jim Rodford on bass, ex Argent, ex Kinks, and now the newest bass player for The Swinging Blue Jeans in addition to being a cousin of Rod Argent, his son on drums and I believe Mark Airey, an excellent lead guitarist. Regards, Bob Kacerow ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Colin, Rod, James Rodman and his son will be the Zombies. Rod Argent asked his cousin, James, to join the Zombie back when they started in teh 60s, but he turned it down because he was the big man in the hot local band at the time. Little did he know that his cousin's career was going to take off. He wised up by the time Argent was launched. I suspect that "Say You Don't Mind" might be a duet if Laine doesn't have to take off early for another gig elsewhere. Steve Harvey ---------------------------------------------------------------------- You have many of us out here holding our breaths to hear how this event turns out. For the record, how much more longer am I going to have to hold my breath. [The Zombies were the first name band I saw - If you don't count the Blue Diamonds]. Einar Einarsson ---------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 16 Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2005 09:07:44 -0700 (PDT) From: Various Subject: Jigsaw Several posts on the same subject: ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Mike Edwards Wrote: > who formed a band named Jigsaw in Australia in 1966. Nine years > later they peaked at #3 with "Sky High.". Another great one. Howard Earnshaw: > Mike, was this the same Jigsaw who had a 'club' hit in the UK with > 'One Way Street'? Same band, but they weren't Aussies. Dave Rhodes ---------------------------------------------------------------------- John Berg wrote: > Prior to their chart success via "Sky High", Jigsaw had released a > couple of late '60s LPs that are in demand among collectors of "pop- > psike" and even "progressive" rock from that era. None have been > reissued on vinyl or CD to my knowledge, but I would welcome a > correction if any of you know of a reissue! "One Way Street" has apparently been much in demand on the current mod scene, at any rate. I so far, alas, have only the New Untouchables' reissue 45, c/w Cliff Nobles' "My love is getting Stronger," on Mousetrap (RNB 005): http://rnbrecords.newuntouchables.com/R_B45.html http://rnbrecords.newuntouchables.com/ I've found "best of" comps featuring "Sky High" and "Who Do You Think You Are?," plus a Japanese (of course ...) CD release of the Sky High album, but no "official" releases with "OWS." It does show up on personal compilations in circulation, however. I've been lucky enough to hear Tony "The Tyger" Sanchez spin his copy, that's how I first heard it. Dave Monroe ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Jigsaw were, in fact, a British group who came from Coventry (near Birmingham for overseas readers). Virtually all of their material was written by drummer Des Dyer and keyboard player Clive Scott. Tony Campbell, ex of fellow Coventry group The Mighty Avengers was lead guitarist. Tony Britnell played sax and Barry Bernard played bass - he'd been in Pinkerton's Assorted Colours. The first recorded for MGM (UK) and Philips in the late sixties, then had some releases on the short-lived BASF label before scoring with "Sky High" on their manager (and publisher) Chas peate's Splash label here in the UK. All of the group's recordings are now owned by Splash. In America they had releases on Chelsea, 20th century and Elektra. They were hugely popular on the club and college circuit here, but with the exception of "Sky High" never made the charts. Dyer and Scott moved into production which is where Candlewick Green/The heywoods come in. Tarragon Records has issued a US Best Of, but I've tried on several occasions to get a UK company to do the same without success. Much underrated group. Austin Powell ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Check this out basically as I recall from memory as I have three Jigsaw albums which have not been re-rleased but this encompasses nearly all tracks: http://tinyurl.com/77rnz Roy Clough ---------------------------------------------------------------------- One Way Street was a song recorded by Floribunda Rose in 1966. Written by John Kongos. Who wrote the "other" One way Street or is it the same song? (Available on Sanctuary cmrcd 395) Jack Russell ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Interesting to note "Sky High" was from an Australian co-production "The Man from Hong Kong" but when the record was released in Australia it was under the moniker " British Jigsaw". Although the band Dyer and Scott have an Australian connection "British Jigsaw" should not be confused with legendary hit making Australian group "Jigsaw". David Walker ---------------------------------------------------------------------- If we're talking about the well-known Australian band called Jigsaw (and we may not be), I've always understood there was no connection with the British band Jigsaw ("Sky High") apart from a coincidence of name, but I'm happy to be proven wrong. When the British Jigsaw's "Sky High" was released here in 1975 they were actually called 'British Jigsaw' locally to avoid confusion with the Australian band. This Australian Jigsaw, formed 1968, were well-known here. They had some charting records and they backed pop star Johnny Chester, who in turn produced Jigsaw's records. See my http://www.poparchives.com.au/browse-artist.php#J Neither Des Dyer nor Clive Scott is listed amongst the personnel of the Australian Jigsaw, at least not in the 'Who's Who of Australian Rock' (not that it's infallible). Perhaps Dyer and Scott formed another, earlier, band called Jigsaw? Lyn Nuttall ---------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop! End

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