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Spectropop - Digest Number 2020



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 19 messages in this issue.


Topics in this digest:

      1. John Fred; Jack Keller; Johnnie Johnson; Eugene Record; Obie Belson; Simon Waronker; Long John Baldry -- R.I.P.
           From: S'pop Projects 
      2. Little Milton, R.I.P.
           From: Steve Harvey 
      3. Unknown group
           From: Bryce Hesterman 
      4. The Arena Twins
           From: Rob Pingel 
      5. Larry Weiss on "Darling Take Me Back I'm Sorry"
           From: Ed Salamon 
      6. Larry Weiss songs for Ruby & the Romantics
           From: Mick Patrick 
      7. Re: Little Milton, R.I.P.
           From: Dave Heasman 
      8. Re: The Arena Twins
           From: Gary Myers 
      9. Re: US covers of UK songs
           From: Joe Nelson 
     10. Re: Bob & Earl @ musica
           From: Einar Einarsson Kvaran 
     11. "Dark End Of The Street"
           From: Richard Havers 
     12. Re: Little Milton, R.I.P.
           From: Norm D Plume 
     13. Re: Unknown group
           From: Fred Clemens 
     14. Gillian Hills
           From: Andres 
     15. Jack Nitzsche at Spectropop update
           From: Martin Roberts 
     16. Re: Little Milton, R.I.P.
           From: Dave Monroe 
     17. Re: "Dark End Of The Street"
           From: James Botticelli 
     18. Re: The Arena Twins
           From: Jeff Lemlich 
     19. Re: Gillian Hills
           From: Dave Monroe 


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Message: 1 Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2005 19:49:51 +0100 From: S'pop Projects Subject: John Fred; Jack Keller; Johnnie Johnson; Eugene Record; Obie Belson; Simon Waronker; Long John Baldry -- R.I.P. Dear Readers, Several obituaries have been added to the S'pop Remembers section. Please take the time to read them: Johnnie Johnson - long-serving piano-playing cohort of Chuck Berry, and one of the architects of rock'n'roll: http://www.spectropop.com/remembers/JJobit.htm John Fred - leader of the Playboys of "Judy In Disguise" fame turned broadcaster and sports coach: http://www.spectropop.com/remembers/JFobit.htm Jack Keller - one of "Kirshner's Kids", the writer of hits for Connie Francis, Little Eva, Bobby Vee, Jimmy Clanton and many others: http://www.spectropop.com/remembers/JKobit.htm Simon Waronker - the founder of Liberty, recording home of Eddie Cochran, Jan & Dean, Bobby Vee, Jackie DeShannon, Gene McDaniels, Timi Yuro . . . and the Chipmunks: http://www.spectropop.com/remembers/SWobit.htm Renaldo "Obie" Benson - bass voice of the Four Tops and composer of Marvin Gaye's soul/protest anthem "What's Goin' On": http://www.spectropop.com/remembers/ROBobit.htm Long John Baldry - key figure in the careers of Elton John, Rod Stewart and Eric Clapton: http://www.spectropop.com/remembers/LJBobit.htm Eugene Record - the creative force of the Chi-Lites, one of the greatest soul ensembles ever to come out of Chicago: http://www.spectropop.com/remembers/ERobit.htm Or access the entire Remembers section here: http://www.spectropop.com/remembers/index.htm R.I.P. The S'pop Team -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 2 Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2005 10:36:37 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Little Milton, R.I.P. >From the New York Times, August 5, 2005: Little Milton, 71, Blues Singer Known for His Gritty Style, Dies By BEN SISARIO Little Milton, a bluesman with a gritty voice and a sensuous guitar style who had hits throughout the 1960's and 70's, died yesterday in a hospital in Memphis. He was 71 and lived in Las Vegas and Memphis. He died a week after suffering a stroke that left him in a coma, said Burton Doss, a spokesman for his record label, Malaco. Born James Milton Campbell on Sept. 7, 1934, in Inverness, Miss., a Delta town less than 10 miles from Indianola, where B. B. King had been born nine years earlier, Little Milton was often compared by critics to both Mr. King and Bobby Blue Bland, the exemplars of elegant, urbane blues. He took his nickname to distinguish himself from his father, Big Milton Campbell, who was also a musician. With chugging rhythms and soaring vocal and guitar tones, his style combined elements of R&B, blues and soul. He learned to play guitar by watching local musicians in Mississippi and listening to the radio, and over his five-decade career his music spanned a wide stretch of blues history. Early in his career he was discovered by Ike Turner, who recommended him to Sam Phillips of Sun Records, the home of Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis and Johnny Cash. His recordings for Sun did not become hits, but he found success on a series of labels from the mid-50's into the 70's. His 1958 song "I'm a Lonely Man," recorded for Bobbin - a label he founded with Bob Lyons, a disc jockey - was an early hit, and "We're Gonna Make It," one of many songs he recorded for Checker during the 60's, became a No. 1 R&B hit in 1965. Among his other successful records for Checker, a subsidiary of the famous Chess label, were "Who's Cheating Who," "Feel So Bad" and "Grits Ain't Groceries." In 1971 he signed with Stax, where he expanded his sound with strings and horns. His records for Stax included "Walking the Back Streets and Cryin' " and "That's What Love Will Make You Do," and he appeared at the label's "Wattstax" concert in Los Angeles in 1972. He stayed with Stax until it went bankrupt in 1976. Since 1984 he had recorded more than a dozen albums for the Malaco label, based in Jackson, Miss. Though Little Milton never enjoyed the kind of crossover success that Mr. King or Mr. Bland had, he remained a strong concert draw. He headlined a concert cruise in the Caribbean each year. His album "Welcome to Little Milton," which featured duets with Lucinda Williams, Keb' Mo', Peter Wolf, Dave Alvin, G. Love and others, was nominated for a Grammy Award in 2000 for best contemporary blues album. Among his survivors are his wife, Pat Campbell. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 3 Date: Sun, 31 Jul 2005 19:44:39 -0000 From: Bryce Hesterman Subject: Unknown group I have a photo of a group of 4 male singers I am trying to identify. My uncle is also in the photo. He was a manager of a radio station and worked closely with Capitol records in the 1960's. I have posted the shot to the S'pop photos section. Can anyone put a name to the group for me please? Bryce Hesterman -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 4 Date: Fri, 05 Aug 2005 19:40:55 -0000 From: Rob Pingel Subject: The Arena Twins Does anyone have any info on this early 60's duo? There's something very familiar about their vocals; possibly were the voices on a number of advertising jingles for cereal. Rob Pingel -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 5 Date: Fri, 05 Aug 2005 20:10:36 -0000 From: Ed Salamon Subject: Larry Weiss on "Darling Take Me Back I'm Sorry" Joop wrote: > Justin, must have been the summer of 1965 you're speaking of, as > Lenny Welch's version of "Darling Take Me Back I'm Sorry" hit the > US charts in june 1965,. It was released may 1965 on the Kapp label > (Kapp 662). B-side: "Time after time". Ray Pollard's version was > also released May 1965. His was on United Artists 856. B-side: "My > girl and I". So I can't decide which was the original version. Larry says: "Ed...I was working for Kapp records at the time, and was in the studio when Tom Catalano produced the record on Lenny...it was also my idea to to Time After Time...my arrangements on both...I don't remember which was the original...though I suspect ours was as I was the writer...Larry" I suggested Larry post on S'pop, but he answered me directly. Ed Salamon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 6 Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2005 00:23:13 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Larry Weiss songs for Ruby & the Romantics Larry Weiss (via Ed Salamon): > "Ed...I was working for Kapp records at the time, and was in the > studio when Tom Catalano produced the record on Lenny...it was > also my idea to do Time After Time...my arrangements on both...I > don't remember which was the original...though I suspect ours was > as I was the writer...Larry" Wow, one of the S'pop era's top songwriters at hand to answer questions! How fantastic! Thanks Ed. Might it be possible for you to ask Larry what he recalls about two of my favourites of his compositions, "Your Baby Doesn't Love You Anymore" and "Does He Really Care For Me", both cut by the wonderful Ruby & the Romantics for Kapp Records with Tom Catalano producing and Alan Lorber arranging - magnificent records, each. I'd post them to musica, but they're both available on CD. Was Larry present at the sessions? If so, what studio was used? And who was the engineer? Did he write the songs for any specific artist? They would both have been great for the Righteous Brothers, although Ruby & the Romantics' versions would take some beating, even with Phil Spector at the controls. What are Larry's thoughts on producer Tom Catalano? And arranger Alan Lorber? Thanks in advance. Btw, my preferred version of "Darling Take Me Back, I'm Sorry" is by Cissie Houston, but every version I've heard is excellent. Great song. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 7 Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2005 23:31:06 +0100 From: Dave Heasman Subject: Re: Little Milton, R.I.P. Good old Milton. I'm on the Shakin' All Over list, the Spectropop list and the Jazz Lovers list, and Milton's obit made them all. He did the best version of "Dark End Of The Street", and I missed seeing him because he dropped out of the 1984 Malaco Records package tour. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 8 Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2005 14:07:26 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: Re: The Arena Twins Previously: > Does anyone have any info on this early 60's duo? Yes! Jeff Lemlich does! The Arena Twins (from St. Pete, FL) had a couple of local hits when I was in HS in Bradenton - "In My Wallet" and "This Could Be The Night". gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 9 Date: Fri, 05 Aug 2005 21:36:58 -0400 From: Joe Nelson Subject: Re: US covers of UK songs Mike Edwards: > Back in the day, there were some great US covers of UK originals. > Here are some examples ... Also the Epic Spendor's "It Could Be Wonderful", originally a UK hit by The Smoke. Joe Nelson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 10 Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2005 18:55:14 -0700 (PDT) From: Einar Einarsson Kvaran Subject: Re: Bob & Earl @ musica I don't know much [read "anything"] about MP3s, or file sharing, but I do know how to burn my Bob & Earl 33 1/3 and send it off in some sort of a trade. [Which could be for the nafarious, "Player to be named later"]. The album does include Don't Ever Leave Me, plus 9 other favotire B&E opii. Life is supposed to be fun, Einar -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 11 Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2005 07:08:20 +0100 From: Richard Havers Subject: "Dark End Of The Street" Dave Heasman wrote: > Good old Milton. I'm on the Shakin' All Over list, the Spectropop > list and the Jazz Lovers list, and Milton's obit made them all. He > did the best version of "Dark End Of The Street". "Everybody keeps asking me what's my favourite version of 'Dark End of The Street' as if there's any other than James Carr." said Dan Penn on the excellent 'Moments from this Theatre' by Dan, and Spooner Oldham. Anyone who has missed this live recording should try and check it out. Their reading of 'I'm Your Puppet' is sublime. Richard -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 12 Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2005 03:46:54 -0700 (PDT) From: Norm D Plume Subject: Re: Little Milton, R.I.P. Milton was over in the UK performing in one of the "It Came From Memphis" concerts at The Barbican last April, a series of events celebrating the music of Memphis from the last five decades. Sadly, I missed his performance in the blues concert, though reviews say he was on top form that night. Are there any UK S'Poppers who live in Oxfordshire? If so, you'll probably know there's a small village there called Little Milton. I wonder if any of the inhabitants - or the man himself - knew of the connection. Norm D. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 13 Date: Sat, 06 Aug 2005 13:31:16 -0000 From: Fred Clemens Subject: Re: Unknown group Bryce Hesterman wrote: > I have a photo of a group of 4 male singers I am trying to > identify. My uncle is also in the photo. He was a manager of a > radio station and worked closely with Capitol records in the > 1960's. I have posted the shot to the S'pop photos section. Can > anyone put a name to the group for me please? The photo is on the small side. How large and clear is the original? Can the record held by your uncle be identified, if only by label? (I'm presuming he's holding the group's record.) Any other clues as to when the photo may have been taken? Fred Clemens -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 14 Date: Sat, 06 Aug 2005 16:28:31 +0400 From: Andres Subject: Gillian Hills I've bought this CD by Gillian Hills. And what a pic on the cover! http://tinyurl.com/92eyo She's the one with black hair in that famous scene from Blow Up where the photographer is having fun with two beauties (the other one Jane Birkin - blond). She also took part in Clockwork Orange as Sonnietta (episode). Regards, Andres (what a pic...) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 15 Date: Fri, 5 Aug 2005 22:45:05 +0100 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Jack Nitzsche at Spectropop update Mick Patrick pulled me to task recently for not including The Timers "No Go Showboat" in Jack Nitzsche's discography. It wasn't that I'm not proud to include this firey hot-rodder amongst Jack's body of work, it was just the problem of how to credit him in the discography. As it is, the credit I've used, although not completely accurate, will have to suffice. I'm sure all the hot-rod, surfin'' & Brian Wilson buffs know this recording as being by Gary Usher, Brian and famous others. So how is Jack Nitzsche involved? Check out the ROTW: http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/index.htm The Timers is not the only 'new' entry to the discography. Released in July but already sold out, is Crazy Horse's double CD set on Rhino Handmade. My copy has not arrived yet. It features alternative versions of tracks from their 1st LP. If any S'popper would care to write a review... http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/discography.htm The latest KHJ jingle is playing on the radio page: http://www.spectropop.com/JackNitzsche/radio.htm Martin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 16 Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2005 07:44:41 -0700 (PDT) From: Dave Monroe Subject: Re: Little Milton, R.I.P. Can anyone shed any light on why/how Titus Turner's "All Around the World" came to be recorded/released by Little Milton as "Grits ain't Groceries"? The latter is a better title, no doubt, catchier, more memorable, whatever, but ... at any rate, The Fleshtones recorded a slamming version under the original title. I recently won a free drink at the unmarked mystery jukebox track night up the street for recognizing LM's "GAG" (though NOT the 45 which replaced ut the next week, but I've never seen the same artist in the same slot two weks in a row, so ...), immediately after which I turned up the 45. So here's to you, Li'l M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 17 Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2005 09:41:18 -0400 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: "Dark End Of The Street" Richard Havers wrote: > "Everybody keeps asking me what's my favourite version of 'Dark End > of The Street' as if there's any other than James Carr." said Dan > Penn on the excellent 'Moments from this Theatre' by Dan, and > Spooner Oldham. Anyone who has missed this live recording should try > and check it out. Their reading of 'I'm Your Puppet' is sublime. If any Spectropoppers have heard of the 80's Boston band called The Pixies, who are now on a sort of comeback tour, their lead singer Frank Black has recently released a solo LP on which he does a creditabe cover of "Dark End Of The Street". Don't forget Clarence Carter's version with the spoken bit at the beginning either...... JB/under the streetlamp -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 18 Date: Sat, 06 Aug 2005 13:58:39 -0000 From: Jeff Lemlich Subject: Re: The Arena Twins Rob Pingel: > Does anyone have any info on this early 60's duo? There's something > very familiar about their vocals; possibly were the voices on a > number of advertising jingles for cereal. Andrew and Sammy Arena are the twins, born 74 years ago in Tampa. They started out as regulars on WALT Radio's Sunday afternoon "Fiesta In Tampa" broadcasts, before entering the Army, where they took part in USO shows with the likes of Lloyd Price and Earl Grant. After returning to Tampa, they were encouraged to try their luck in New York, where they won a Ted Mack Amateur Hour competition. Songwriter Bernie Wayne befriended them, and had them cut a demo tape, which he took to Kapp Records. That led to three singles for Kapp, followed by two singles on Columbia, some of which did well on Florida's west coast (as Gary Myers mentioned), but fell short nationally. The guys later founded the Arena Tile Company, and built condos and townhouses in the Tampa area. I'm not aware of them recording any cereal ads, but it's certainly possible. Jeff Lemlich http://www.limestonerecords.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- Message: 19 Date: Sat, 6 Aug 2005 07:24:19 -0700 (PDT) From: Dave Monroe Subject: Re: Gillian Hills Andres wrote: > I've bought this CD by Gillian Hills. And what a pic on the cover! > http://tinyurl.com/92eyo She's the one with black hair in that > famous scene from Blow Up where the photographer is having fun > with two beauties (the other one Jane Birkin - blond). She also > took part in Clockwork Orange as Sonnietta (episode). Yeah, strangely enough, she's probably been most seen in brief Swinging London (even if what's being swung in the later film is a cane) threesome scenes. But some of you at least might also be familiar with here as the title character in Beat Girl, which also features Adam Faith (who sings the title song as well), Christopher Lee, and The John Barry Seven (house band playing the killer instrumental version of the title song at the beginning--the soundtrack's been reissued on CD/LP, by the way--and not of course without Jane Birkin connections as well): http://members.tripod.com/ye_ye_girls/artists/hills_01.html http://imdb.com/name/nm0385122/ Beat Girl (1960): http://imdb.com/title/tt0055779/ And check out the taglines: http://imdb.com/title/tt0055779/taglines "Strip-strip hooray!" indeed ... For the record, the very wonderful April March, Spumco ("Ren & Stimpy") animator and presnet-day US ye-ye girl extraodinaire, recorded a burning cover of GH's "Tu Mens." I'd think most anyone here would enjoy her Paris in April album (plus an attendant EP), featuring covers in both English and French of ye-ye classics by Gillian Hills, Francois Hardy, Chantal Kelly, Dani, Serge Gainsbourg, et al. Her translation of the Gainsbourg-penned France Gall classic "Laissez tomber les filles" as "Chick Habit" is nothing short of genius, pop musical or otherwise. Here's some info: http://64.207.140.38/index.html http://ctomag.com/may16cto/blake2.html http://www.dustbrothers.com/ideal/aprilmarch1.html "I've recorded with Ronnie Spector (also performed with her as a Ronette), Jonathan Richman and Brian Wilson.": http://www.dustbrothers.com/ideal/aprilmarch/bio.html And speaking of pictures: http://64.207.140.38/am.gallery.html I hate to admit it, I don't have her (France only) Gainsbourgism album, but at least I do have her Kokopop single ("Voo Doo Doll"), featuring the immortal "Stay Away from Robert Mitchum." Sound advice, indeed ... -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]------------------- SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop! End

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