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Spectropop - Digest Number 1969



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 9 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Sandi Sheldon "One Minute Too Late"
           From: Simon White 
      2. Sherman & the Teenagers
           From: Mick Patrick 
      3. That Thing You Do!--The group???
           From: Clark Besch 
      4. Re: Big John
           From: Bob Rashkow 
      5. Re: More Sandi Sheldon
           From: Howard Earnshaw 
      6. Re: Big John
           From: Chris 
      7. Attention Music Historians and Journalists
           From: S.J. Dibai 
      8. Re: Big Bruce/Steve Greenberg
           From: S.J. Dibai 
      9. Re: Honey Ltd
           From: Mick Patrick 


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Message: 1 Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2005 19:15:28 +0100 From: Simon White Subject: Re: Sandi Sheldon "One Minute Too Late" John H wrote: > I see an auction currently on eBay for a Sandi Sheldon single on the > Okeh label: "One Minute Too Late/ Touch My Heart." I didn't see this > title listed in her discography on the main Spectropop site. Can > anyone shed some light on it? http://tinyurl.com/a97ec I suspect I should respond to this. This is a 45 recorded by producer Ian Levine when Sandi/Kendra was here in London to appear live at "The Rocket" Allnighter. The 'a' side is an original song that I have a particular soft spot for (and I feel others may like) whilst the flip is a solo recording of The Vonettes track which originally came out on Cobblestone. Both are in a 'Northern Soul' vein. The story of how they come to be on "Okeh" is interesting. Sandi's big Northern 'hit' was Okeh 7277 a 1967 release (directly before one of Little Richard's on the label) but prior to Levine recording Sandi for his 45, he had been working on an album with a young singer called Ebony Alleyne for Sony UK. As promotional items, three different Ebony Alleyne 45's were released on the 'Okeh' label with Sony's blessing. All are in a smooth 1960's style that would appeal to many readers here. The first Ebony Alleyne 45 follows on numerically from the last "Okeh" 45 in 1970 - The Cheers, Okeh 7338. Therefore the first Eboyny Alleyne 45 "Walk Away And Never Look Back"/"Count The Days" is Okeh 7739. The album however was never released, but a set of circumstances connected with the unfortunate demise of the "Rocket" Allnighters meant the 45's escaped into the world and are available from a number of UK record dealers. In fact if anyone is interested I may have a few spare myself. The Sandi Sheldon 45, Okeh 7340 slots into the numbering sequence. However, all copies of "One Minute Too Late" have a pressing fault on them in them in the form of a crackle. In a way though, this adds to the authenticity sound and doesn't really detract. Now I'm going back to wondering who Joy Lovejoy was. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2005 19:21:49 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Sherman & the Teenagers Are there any Leiber & Stoller experts out there? I hope so, 'cos I have a question about one of their more obscure compositions: "The Draw" recorded by Sherman & the Teenagers on Columbia 4-42054 in 1961. Has this track ever been released on CD? If so, details please. Does anyone have a copy of the 45, perhaps? I'd love to hear it. Thanks in advance. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2005 17:16:08 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: That Thing You Do!--The group??? Hi all. This weekend has been Husker Heaven here with Cornhuskers playing and winning in World Series (until Sunday night). We celebrated at the local "Haymarket Heydays" (pretty rural sounding, ain't it?) by seeing the band named "That Thing You Do!" Their ad said "featuring music from the movie". On stage, the announcer claimed they had written some of the movie soundtrack songs. I know some of the writers had a band after the movie, but not by that name. Anyway, they started their set by playing "Dirty Water" (obligatory "I love Lincoln" in ending lyrics) and "Love Potion #9" (Searchers' version) which were a little later than the movie setting. Then, they launched in to most all of the soundtrack songs back to back. It was technically sung and played pretty well, but the band had NO banter with the crowd (maybe because the crowd was very UN- enthusiastic, which was embarrasing to me. I felt like we two were the only people clapping!) and had no onstage fun during the songs. That made the whole set seem rather slick and overplayed instead of fresh and 60's sounding like the movie group. Even more disappointing was the fact that their 2nd and 3rd set was to be 70's & 80's power pop. Yes, I wondered (no pun) what they would play: Raspeberries, Plimsouls??? But, seems like the band should have been a 1964 band. I suppose it wouldn't go over for long with a croud. So, I looked on inet and couldn't find any info but that they were a New York band. Anyone know any more about this band? They were pretty good, but needed to have a LOT more fun onstage. Thanks, Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2005 14:00:24 EDT From: Bob Rashkow Subject: Re: Big John Patti Page's version of "Big John" calls to mind Steve Greenberg's "Big Bruce" (1969?), which is completely politically incorrect, but amusing all the same. Big Bad Brucey-Woosey is a hairdresser who wears bell bottoms and a polka-dot tie, etc. He's a gay stereotype although Greenberg never once mentions any of the labels. Pretty cruel, but thankfully even though it Bubbled Under for a while, it never got on the Billboard charts. It seems to me that recordings of this type were easier to appreciate back then--am I alone in thinking this?! I think nowadays things like this are done more out of ignorance and hostility, while in 1969 Greenberg's only purpose was to entertain, not to mention put forward yet another parody of the Jimmy Dean hit. Bobster -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2005 14:02:19 EDT From: Howard Earnshaw Subject: Re: More Sandi Sheldon John H: > I see an auction currently on eBay for a Sandi Sheldon single on the > Okeh label: "One Minute Too Late/ Touch My Heart." I didn't see > this title listed in her discography on the main Spectropop site. > Can anyone shed some light on it? http://tinyurl.com/a97ec I believe this is a 'new' release, one of those specially licensed thingies. Howard PS: I'd just like to thank Mick Patrick for allowing me to print his Sandi Sheldon piece in the latest 'Soul Up North'. Special thanks to to the Spectropop website too (who I've mentioned in the credits :-) Other artists featured in this issue (#48) are Bobby Sheen as revealed by Simon White, an interview with Garnet Mimms conducted by Kym Fuller, Chicago soulman Johnny Moore, an obituary,an interview with Ritchie Pitts (ex Velours) by Colin Wood and loads of vinyl reviews along ith features on th Vee Jay label by Stuart Drake and the short lived UK Inferno label by label founder Neil Rushton. If anyone out in Spectropop land would like a copy please mail me off list for payment details. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2005 20:42:01 -0000 From: Chris Subject: Re: Big John Phil X Milstein wrote: > There is a long tradition of "alternate versions" being sold under- > the-counter, down there with the filthy comedy records, as "party > records," mostly in ghetto record stores. ...like "Think Twice: Version X" (per the engineer) by Laverne Baker and Jackie Wilson! It's on "Celebrities at Their Worst Vol. 2". Dr. Demento played it once and had to bleep most of it... "You like chocolate?" "No - not that kind!", Chris -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2005 19:46:32 -0000 From: S.J. Dibai Subject: Attention Music Historians and Journalists Greetings, fellow Spectropoppers. As you know, I've been working on a Philadelphia music history project that has been academic in nature so far, but now I am going to try to spin part of it off into a journalistic venture as well. I majored in history in college and thus have training in the field at large, but I have no formal training in MUSIC history, where the rules of the game are clearly different from, say, political history. And I am new to the field of journalism, period. Would any music historians and/or journalists among us be willing to help me understand some of the legal and ethical issues involved in these fields? If so, please contact me off- list. Much appreciated, S.J. Dibai -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2005 19:37:04 -0000 From: S.J. Dibai Subject: Re: Big Bruce/Steve Greenberg Bob Rashkow wrote: > Patti Page's version of "Big John" calls to mind Steve Greenberg's > "Big Bruce" (1969?) Pretty cruel, but thankfully even though it > Bubbled Under for a while, it never got on the Billboard charts. Actually, it did--it peaked at #97 on the Hot 100 and spent a whopping three weeks on that chart. > It seems to me that recordings of this type were easier to > appreciate back then--am I alone in thinking this?! I think > nowadays things like this are done more out of ignorance and > hostility, while in 1969 Greenberg's only purpose was to entertain, > not to mention put forward yet another parody of the Jimmy Dean > hit. I think you're right. Anyone who put out a "Big Bruce"-type record in this day and age would be asking for trouble. But I can appreciate "Big Bruce" in historical context. It's a funny period piece, that's all. I've always wondered who Steve Greenberg was and what ever happened to him. S.J. Dibai -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Mon, 20 Jun 2005 21:54:26 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Honey Ltd Me: > Paul's right, the Honey Ltd sound as good as they look. It's time > some of their tracks appeared on legit CD - easier said than done, > I guess. In the meantime, I've posted one to musica - The Honey > Ltd "Come Down" (LHI 1208, 1968), written by Laura L. Polkinghorne > Creamer, arranged by Ian Freebairn Smith, produced by Lee Hazlewood. John H: > The Honey Ltd. sound amazing. I would love to hear anything and > everything else they've done! I think I'm in love. Say no more. I've posted another track to musica: The Honey Ltd "Tomorrow Your Heart" (LHI 1208, 1968), written by Marsha Jo Temmer and Laura L. Polkinghorne Creamer, arranged by Ian Freebairn Smith, produced by Lee Hazlawood. Enjoy: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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