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Spectropop - Digest Number 1908



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 20 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Early Elton
           From: Dave Marheine 
      2. Johnny & Sylvie
           From: Frank 
      3. Re: Early Elton
           From: Eddy 
      4. Johnny Hallyday
           From: Richard Williams 
      5. Re: Early Elton
           From: Eddy 
      6. Johnnie Johnson, RIP
           From: Country Paul 
      7. Re: Early Elton
           From: Stewart Mason 
      8. Toni Wine
           From: Austin Roberts 
      9. Collins working on King Records documentary film
           From: Karen Andrew 
     10. "Jerry Landis" vs. Bat Carroll; Razz-Ma-Tazz=Street Song; KIMN; missing verses
           From: Country Paul 
     11. Record shops
           From: Peter Lerner 
     12. Re: Johnny Hallyday / expiring copyrights
           From: Frank 
     13. King Records documentary film
           From: Karen Andrew 
     14. Love Potions 9 & 10; Cyrkle; JB's finds; double tracked teen idols
           From: Country Paul 
     15. Re: Photo from Nashville
           From: Joe Nelson 
     16. John Fred gone
           From: Gary Myers 
     17. Alison Wonder, R.I.P.
           From: Mick Patrick 
     18. Re: John Fred gone
           From: Billy G Spradlin 
     19. Claire Francis & Birmingham (UK) Groups
           From: Austin Powell 
     20. Re: The Hollies' "Stop! Stop! Stop!" album
           From: Billy G Spradlin 


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Message: 1 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2005 13:51:09 -0000 From: Dave Marheine Subject: Re: Early Elton Phil X Milstein wrote: > Can anyone help steer me toward a collection of the soundalikes > session(s) (i.e. covers of current big hits) that Elton John > recorded early in his career? ... Even just a listing of the titles > he recorded in that mode would be helpful. "Chartbusters Go Pop!! 16 Legendary Covers From 1969/1970 As Sung By Elton John" contains: 1 Natural Sinner Fairweather-Low 2:48 2 United We Stand Hiller, Simons 2:46 3 Spirit in the Sky Greenbaum 3:35 4 Travelin' Band Fogerty 2:15 5 I Can't Tell the Bottom from the Top Fletcher, Flett 3:39 6 Good Morning Freedom Cook, Greenaway, Hammond ... 3:05 7 Up Around the Bend Fogerty 2:34 8 She Sold Me Magic Christie, Herbert 1:56 9 Come and Get It McCartney 2:12 10 Love of the Common People Hurley, Wilkins 2:29 11 Signed, Sealed, Delivered I'm Yours Garrett, Hardaway, Wonder 2:27 12 It's All in the Game Dawes, Sigman 2:19 13 Yellow River Christie 2:30 14 My Baby Loves Lovin' Cook, Greenaway 2:41 15 Cotton Fields Leadbelly 2:45 16 Lady d'Arbanville Stevens 3:33 My pal Murphy picked this up for 99 cents at Wal-Mart last year. In addition to various versions of the 16 song collection on various record labels, All Music Guide also lists a 20 song version which adds: Young Gifted & Black Irvine, Simone 3:02 In the Summertime Dorset 2:51 Snake in the Grass Blaikley 3:02 Neanderthal Man Creme, Godley, Stewart 3:34 These appear to be legitimate releases, "licensed from Castle Communications, Pickwick International", in the case of the disc I have (on the Purple Pyramid label). The Nick Drake songs, on the other hand, would probably be classified as bootlegs, and therefore can be found on eBay: ELTON JOHN the lost demo sessions of '69 This is a brand new silver-disc cd released exclusively on Ebay... In 1969 the famous producer Joe Boyd produced this demo album promoting various songs written by John Martyn, Nick Drake, Beverly Martin, Mike Heron, and Ed Carter who were members of the Warlock publishing stable. The session featured Elton John - Piano and Vocals, Linda Peters (soon to become Linda Thompson when she married Richard Thompson) - Vocals, Jim Capaldi - Drums, Simon Nicol - Guitar, Pat Donaldson - Bass, with arrangements by Del Newman. This album practically disappeared until the end of the '80s but is a truly magnificent showcase of Elton's early talents. There are a very few white label vinyl copies of this album in existence (about 7 are accounted for) making this a very rare collection indeed. TRACK LISTING:- 1 STORMBRINGER (John Martyn) 2 WAY TO BLUE (Nick Drake) 3 GO OUT AND GET IT (John Martyn) 4 WHEN THE DAY IS DONE (Nick Drake 5 TIME HAS TOLD ME (Nick Drake) 6 SATURDAY SUN (Nick Drake) 7 SWEET HONESTY (Beverly Martin) 8 YOU GET BRIGHTER (Mike Heron) 9 THIS MOMENT (Mike Heron) 10 I DON'T MIND (Ed Carter) 11 PIED PAUPER (Ed Carter) Lead Vocals:- tracks 1-7 by Elton John, tracks 8-11 by Linda Peters There's also a CD including "DJM Demoes" in addition to the Nick Drake songs out there. Hope this is more than you needed to know! Dave Marheine -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2005 15:44:30 +0200 From: Frank Subject: Johnny & Sylvie Phil X Milstein: > I will, though, revert my comment to music by asking if (Johnny) > Hallyday and Sylvie Vartan are still married. Nope... They've been divorced for quite a long time now and Johnny had the time to re-marry at least two or three times since. As for Sylvie she's married to Tony Scotti (of the Scotti Brothers) and lives in L.A. Frank -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2005 16:16:57 +0200 From: Eddy Subject: Re: Early Elton Norm D Plume: > I think (Elton) recorded these with Linda Thompson (or Peters as > she then still was), and they sound an intriguing combination. Any > idea where one can get these? Officially known as the Warlock Sampler, a publisher's demo LP included 11 songs, all recorded at Sound Techniques, Chelsea in July 1970. Side one has You get brighter, This moment, I don't mind, Pied pauper and Go out and get it. On side 2 there's Stormbringer, Sweet honesty, Way to blue, When the day is done, Time has told me and Saturday sun. Side 2 are all Elton lead vocals. Side 1 has all the Linda Peters lead vocals, except for Go out and get it, which has an Elton lead with Linda on backing vocals. Ten of these have appeared on bootleg, omitting This moment. All tracks feature a full band with obviously Elton on piano. I have no details on the other musicians, but I'm presuming Caleb Quaye (gtr), Tony Murray (bs) and Roger Pope (dr). Go Out and Get It is playing in Musica now. For those interested, I've uploaded the entire album at: http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/Rockofages/files/ Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2005 15:37:14 +0100 From: Richard Williams Subject: Johnny Hallyday 1. Phil Milstein asks if Johnny Hallyday and Sylvie Vartan are still married. The answer, malheurusement, is very much non. Both of them remarried, Sylvie to one of the Scotti brothers (Tony, I think). For the latest info, see Paris-Match almost any week. 2. Re the correspondence between Phil and Frank on the subject of expiring copyrights, raised bvy Hallyday's attempt to wrest the ownership of his masters from Universal: it's a difficult one, which strikes at the heart of the historical integrity of labels such as Motown and Stax, in particular, and in those case at the question of authorship of a recording. In general, though, it's worth asking why, having recouped their costs and made their profits, should a label be able to sit on an artist's recordings for the rest of time? Wise artists with shred managers make production deals which ensure that the ownership of the masters reverts to them after a period of, say, five or 10 years. Not everyone, of course, negotiates from such a position of strength. But, as my friend Charlie Gillett suggested to me yesterday, the record business should borrow a piece of standard practice from the book industry: if a publisher lets a book go out of print for, say, 18 months, the full rights automatically revert to the author. Had Lou Johnson, to take a Spectropop favourite, been able to negotiate such a such a deal with Big Top, then we might be able to buy his great original versions of various Bacharach-David songs on CD today. Richard Williams -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2005 16:37:13 +0200 From: Eddy Subject: Re: Early Elton Dave Marheine > The session featured Elton John - Piano and Vocals, Linda Peters > (soon to become Linda Thompson when she married Richard Thompson) - > Vocals, Jim Capaldi - Drums, Simon Nicol - Guitar, Pat Donaldson - > Bass, with arrangements by Del Newman. Thanks for the info here, Dave! For those who are familiar with the original RPM label cover for the Reg Dwight's piano goes pop, I've uploaded the original cover design for it in the photo section at http://url123.com/wkexy : The happy Hammond goes pop on the Hallmark label. Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2005 10:42:32 -0400 From: Country Paul Subject: Johnnie Johnson, RIP Johnnie Johnson, Floyd Cramer, Leon Russell, Allen Toussaint, Fats Domino and whoever was pounding chords on so many of the End-Gone sessions (mainly the Chantels) are the main influences on my non- classical piano playing. This is from today's (April 15) AP wire. Country Paul --------- Chuck Berry Remembers Johnnie Johnson By CHERYL WITTENAUER Associated Press Writer UNIVERSITY CITY, Mo. - Rock 'n roll legend Chuck Berry had just returned from a European tour when he learned at Chicago's O'Hare Airport that his longtime friend and collaborator Johnnie Johnson was dead at age 80. Late Wednesday, he went directly to Blueberry Hill nightclub in this St. Louis suburb, where Berry and Johnson had played together as recently as a year ago, to remember "the man with a dynamite right hand" with whom he shared a half-century of music and memories. A master of boogie-woogie, Johnson was "my piano player who no one else has come near," said Berry, 78, still spry and dapper in a royal blue shirt, a silver bolo tie, pleated charcoal slacks and mariner's cap. Through 50-plus years of riffs and syncopation, late-night jams - and later a painful lawsuit - Berry and Johnson only grew in their mutual admiration and respect. "Johnnie and I have always been friends," said Berry, who teamed with Johnson for hits like "Roll Over Beethoven" and "No Particular Place to Go." Johnson died Wednesday at his St. Louis home; the cause of death was not immediately known. Johnson, a self-taught pianist with a low-key persona, never won the fame heaped upon Berry. But he eventually became known as the "Father of Rock 'N' Roll Piano" and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2001 in the "sidemen" category. Johnson's and Berry's long collaboration helped define early rock 'n' roll and put St. Louis on the music map along with the budding team of Ike and Tina Turner. Each performed at clubs on both sides of the nearby Mississippi River. On New Year's Eve 1952 at The Cosmopolitan in East St. Louis, Ill., Johnson called Berry to fill in for an ailing saxophonist in his Sir John Trio. The struggling and unknown Berry, who says he was playing more then for enjoyment than money, rushed over. "He gave me a break" and his first commercial gig, for $4, Berry recalled. "I was excited. My best turned into a mess. I stole the group from Johnny." Johnson never held it against him. "Midway through the show, Chuck did a hillbilly country number with a bluesy vein, and it knocked people out," said Blueberry Hill club owner Joe Edwards, a friend of both men. Johnson later recalled Berry had a car that allowed them to travel to more distant clubs - the Blue Flame, Blue Note and Club Imperial. Berry played so well he became front man for the band, which took his name. Their long partnership, forged in the '50s, would run steadily for another 20 years. They still performed occasionally in the 1980s and '90s. Edwards said their collaboration formed the bricks of rock 'n roll, and that the two stirred hillbilly and blues in one pot to create a unique sound. Johnson often composed the music on piano, then Berry converted it to guitar and wrote the lyrics. Berry's "Johnny B. Goode," was a tribute to Johnson. After he and Berry parted ways, Johnson performed with Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, John Lee Hooker and Bo Diddley, among others. Still, there were rough spots in the pair's collaboration. In 2000, Johnson sued Berry over royalties and credit he believed he was due for the songs they composed together. The lawsuit was dismissed two years later. Berry said he always wondered who was behind the lawsuit, because "Johnnie would never initiate a complaint such as that. Johnnie would never have waited 40 years to sue." Berry said he would perform a tribute concert in Johnson's honor, ideally at downtown St. Louis's roughly 70,000-seat Edward Jones Dome. "We'll fill that sucker," he said. Though Berry said he'll miss his friend and his music, he's not melancholy. "My turn is coming very soon," he said. "Would you shed a tear for Chuck? I hope not, because I don't see why one should weep when something inevitable must come. "At 78, I'm glad to be anywhere, anytime." -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2005 13:15:57 -0400 From: Stewart Mason Subject: Re: Early Elton My copy of the Elton John soundalike songs is called CHARTBUSTERS GO POP!: 16 LEGENDARY COVERS FROM 1969/70 AS SUNG BY ELTON JOHN, copyright 1998 on the Purple Pyramid label, which I believe is the reissue arm of the Cleopatra label. The small print says the tracks were licensed from Castle Communications, so I bet Castle/Sanctuary has reissued them as well. As a fellow Bostonian, Phil, it might help you to know that I bought this CD in the remainder bin at the Stop and Shop in Brighton for something like $5 -- the next time you're shopping for groceries, have a look and you might get lucky. S -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2005 12:23:22 -0400 From: Austin Roberts Subject: Toni Wine James Botticelli: > It's like Toni Wine's "My Boyfriend's Coming Home For Christmas" on > Colpix. During the piano solo in the middle she sobbingly talks > about how "hawd" it is to be without him. Brooklyn ain't backwoods > but it sure is distinguishable. She married a Southern guy (Chips Moman) for awhile and may have tried to emulate his accent (lol). Who knows; all I know is she's quite a lady and put the T in talent. Take good care, Austin R. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2005 13:42:25 -0700 (PDT) From: Karen Andrew Subject: Collins working on King Records documentary film Friday, April 15, 2005 Collins working on King Records documentary film By C.E. Hanifin, Cincinnati Enquirer staff writer In the 1950s and '60s, King Records secured a prominent place for Cincinnati on the musical map. Renowned funk artist Bootsy Collins, who got his start as a session player there, thinks that the Evanston- based label's legacy can help put the city back at the music world's center. (Evanston is a Cincinnati neighborhood) As part of Collins' ongoing campaign to honor King Records' history, he recently began filming a documentary. On Saturday, he invited several musicians who worked with one of the label's biggest stars, James Brown, to his Clermont County home for tapings for the film, titled "Kings & Queens of King Records." Collins says he wants young people to know the stories of King Records veterans such as MC Danny Ray, trombonist Fred Wesley and singers Bobby Byrd and Vicki Byrd, whom he met while they were all working with Brown during the '60s. Their musical success stories will inspire Cincinnati's next wave of stars, he says. See the rest of this article at this link. Of course, in a few days you may have to pay for it. Way to get around that is get on your Google or other search engine and copy in the headline: Collins working on King Records documentary film: http://news.enquirer.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20050415/ENT/504150350 Karen Andrew -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2005 16:35:06 -0400 From: Country Paul Subject: "Jerry Landis" vs. Bat Carroll; Razz-Ma-Tazz=Street Song; KIMN; missing verses Once again, so far behind, so much catching up to do.... Old business: I did check out Bat Carroll's "A Different Kind of Love" (Ace [US] 603) to contrast it to Paul Simon's unreleased version on the "Work In Progress Vol. 1" CD. Gotta say, Simon's version has it hands down over Carroll, in tightness of the accompaniment, vocal style and arrangement. Why it was never released is a mystery. Interestingly, Carroll's flip side, "Grow Up," is written by Mac Rebennack [Dr. John], and in a heavier arrangement could have been a pretty good track; here it's just lightweight fluff. However, the little piano lick indicates it may well be the good Doctor on the keyboard. I'm still curious to hear Bat Carroll's "Aw Who" (Ace 570, 1959) anthologized several times on CD: perhaps it rocks harder than these two. Dave The Rave: > Speaking of rare 45's, I have another 45 in my collection that I > call the original beginnings of "I Can't Quit Her". Remember "New > York's My Home (Razz-A-Ma-Tazz)" on Aurora 164? Please tell me > something about this song. Check out the Kitchen Cinq's "Street Song" (LHI) - same song. Sean: > Amazing what you find posted in Spectropop and on the web! On this > page - http://www.moonrakers.us/KIMN%20jingle%202.mp3 - is the > KIMN, Denver version of the WABC, New York "Jimmy Smith Sonovox > jingle."...[I]n New York, the Sonovox sang "WABC" instead of the > KIMN slogans....I'd love to have an mp3 of this version or the > original.... ...and thanks to Les Peterson of the Moonrakers, I do. And so do you, as I've taken the liberty of playing it to musica. Les reports it comes from a long out-of-print KIMN oldies LP; this dub is from his copy. Tony Leong: > [D]id you know that the Dixie Cups sang a whole extra verse during > the break of "Gee Baby Gee", and Mary Weiss sang a whole verse > after her dialogue with MaryAnn and Margie at the fade out of "Give > Him A Great Big Kiss"??? I didn't know - what was cut out? (Or will I find out as I keep catching up?) Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2005 21:22:31 +0100 From: Peter Lerner Subject: Record shops Kingsley tempted me with the following: > I plan to visit the wonderful Revolution records in Diss, Norfolk > (an old style emporium where they know about and still enjoy a wide > range of music) to see if I can find it! Can we compile together a list of other great outlets for rare vinyl. I have no idea if this place is good, but frustratingly I got lost driving in Birmingham (UK not Alabama today) and had to drive right by Reddingtons Rare Records. And I can certainly recommend Velvet Fog in the Blue Mountains, west of Sydney, Australia. Peter -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sat, 16 Apr 2005 10:00:08 +0200 From: Frank Subject: Re: Johnny Hallyday / expiring copyrights Richard Williams: > Re the correspondence between Phil and Frank on the subject of > expiring copyrights, raised bvy Hallyday's attempt to wrest the > ownership of his masters from Universal: it's a difficult one, which > strikes at the heart of the historical integrity of labels such as > Motown and Stax, in particular, and in those case at the question of > authorship of a recording. In general, though, it's worth asking > why, having recouped their costs and made their profits, should a > label be able to sit on an artist's recordings for the rest of > time? Wise artists with shred managers make production deals which > ensure that the ownership of the masters reverts to them after a > period of, say, five or 10 years. Not everyone, of course, > negotiates from such a position of strength. But, as my friend > Charlie Gillett suggested to me yesterday, the record business > should borrow a piece of standard practice from the book industry: > if a publisher lets a book go out of print for, say, 18 months, the > full rights automatically revert to the author. Had Lou Johnson, to > take a Spectropop favourite, been able to negotiate such a such a > deal with Big Top, then we might be able to buy his great original > versions of various Bacharach-David songs on CD today. This is indeed a very difficult and tricky subject. I agree with Richard that producers who don't exploit masters for a certain time should see their rights revert to the artists. However it is quite difficult to define the amount of profit after which a producer should lose his rights. And such a policy could lead to a situation where producers might refrain from producing artists for fearv they should lose their rights afetr a while. Frank -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2005 14:13:34 -0700 (PDT) From: Karen Andrew Subject: King Records documentary film Sorry, to add this to my original message but I wanted people to see the one paragraph at the bottom of the article: Collins currently is seeking additional musicians and staff members who worked at King Records during its run from 1943 to 1971 to be interviewed. If this is any of you or you know of someone, I guess send an e-mail to the reporter to try to get contact info.: E-mail chanifin@enquirer.com Karen -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2005 17:16:25 -0400 From: Country Paul Subject: Love Potions 9 & 10; Cyrkle; JB's finds; double tracked teen idols Billy G. Spradlin mentions the Clovers' "Love Potion #9." There's an alternate version with the end line: "It felt so good that I'm goin' back again, I've got to see what happens with Love Potion #10." Was this recorded before or after the hit version (with "#9" throughout)? Was it a punch-in or a whole other vocal track? And, last question, what's the backstory/reason for all this? Anyone know? Previously: > [B]ack to The Cyrkle - are none of the members performing anymore? > That's one 60s group I'd enjoy seeing together again! I sent a note with that question to Don Dannemann; if he answers I'll let you know. JB's finds: > Mitchell Torok - Pink Chiffon - Guyden (a hit from way back then) So was his "Caribbean," which was also covered by Hank Snow. He also wrote the early Jim Reeves hit "Mexican Joe.") More at http://www.icebergradio.com/artist/25761/mitchell_torok.html . I always liked "Pink Chiffon" - really pretty; Torok was in his late 20s then, singing about a prom. Hmm.... JB also found: > Carol Kay & The Teen-Aires - I'll Never Change - Crest Isn't this the B-side of the Holly/Valens/Bopper memorial tearjerker "Three Stars" by Tommy Dee? As I remember, that was the hit that put Crest on the map. (It's interesting how most labels at the time changed their label dersign to something fancy once they had a hit, but Crest, despite the potential of its name, kept its silver-on-blue block print throughout its existence.) Mikey: > Double tracking is used MOST to make a weak vocalist sound > passable. That's why the producers of poor singers like Gary Lewis, > Billy J Kramer, Fabian, Frankie Avalon, etc ALWAYS double tracked > and triple tracked their vocals. Double tracking does not make a > bad singers flaws more visible, it hides them. Yes, Fabian was indeed an awful singer (self-admittedly), but without digging out the one or two I have by him, I don't remember any double-tracking on his records. (Perhaps they would have benefitted!) I disagree with your assessment of Frankie Avalon, who is a quite respectable singer; the early stuff, like "Gingerbread" and "De De Dinah," is said to have been recorded with him holding his nose (literally) to get a "teenier" sound. (Both tracks genuinely rock, actually, and the backing vocal group on "Gingerbread" really gives the record some polish.) But I don't remember double-tracking on those, either, and certainly not on "Venus" and his other "mellower" songs. Country Paul (still catching up) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Sat, 16 Apr 2005 00:00:19 -0400 From: Joe Nelson Subject: Re: Photo from Nashville Nick Archer: > Ed Salamon graciously hosted another Spectropop Nashville meeting > this past Sunday. I've posted a photo to the photo section. Left to > Right, Skip Woolwine WSM radio, Buzz Cason/Gary Miles (Everlasting > Love, Sandy), Bill Lloyd (Foster & Lloyd, Sky Kings), Tony Moon > (Dante & the Evergreens, producer Lemonade Charade), Austin Roberts > (Rocky, I.O.U.), Larry Weiss (Bend Me, Shape Me, Rhinestone > Cowboy), Ed Salamon, Nick Archer. Just out of curiousity, just below the gold record on the wall between Austin and Larry it looks like the top of another head peaking out (almost looks like Michael Jackson). Any idea who or what that is? Joe Nelson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Fri, 15 Apr 2005 21:31:11 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: John Fred gone John Fred dead at 63 By MARY FOSTER Associated Press writer NEW ORLEANS -- John Fred Gourrier, the singer best known for his 1960s hit -- "Judy in Disguise (With Glasses)" -- died Friday at Tulane Hospital. Gourrier, 63, who went by the stage name John Fred, had been ill for months, said his former manager, Lynn Ourso, of the Louisiana Department of Economic Development. "He had a kidney transplant seven months ago," Ourso said. "Two months after that he had another operation to remove his old kidneys, and that's when things went wrong. He'd basically been in and out of the hospital since then." John Fred & His Playboy Band had a regional following in the South when they recorded their parody of the popular Beatles' song "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds," in 1967. Written by Gorrier and fellow band member Andrew Bernard, "Judy In Disguise" was recorded in New Orleans with the Fats Domino band on Dec. 17. By Jan. 20, 1968 it had replaced another Beatles song, "Hello Goodbye," as the No. 1 song in the nation. The song, well orchestrated with a snappy beat, remained at the top of the charts for two weeks. "I have a great picture of John with the Beatles when the band toured the United Kingdom at that time," Ourso said. Although "Judy in Disguise" was the only Top 40 song the group ever had, Fred had made the charts before. Fred formed his first group while he was still in high school and recorded a song titled "Shirley." "That made the charts and he was invited to do the Alan Freed show in New York," Ourso said. "After that show he got a call from Dick Clark to be on American Bandstand. He told him he couldn't do it because he had to go home to play in a basketball game." Fred was a student at Catholic High School in Baton Rouge at the time, Ourso said, and the basketball team was in the state championship race. Fred played college basketball for a while at Southeastern Louisiana and worked as a high school basketball coach at times. "He performed all his life," Ourso said. "There was always a band." The last performance was about three years ago, Ourso said. "We played for the Senate every year, He loved that gig." Fred is survived by his wife, Sandra, and one son. gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Sat, 16 Apr 2005 10:57:33 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Alison Wonder, R.I.P. Mark Maldwyn: > Will Cheryl Barrymore be included on the remembers section? I'll remember Cheryl, not for the behind the scenes role she played in the career of Michael Barrymore (in fact, I will *forgive* her for that) but for the singles she made under various stage monikers. Two of her best two records - "Once More With Feeling" using the name Alison Wonder, and "I'll Forget You Tonight" as by Cheryl St Clair - are available on "Dream Babes: Am I Dreaming" (RPM 137) and "Dream Babes, Vol 3: Backcomb'n'Beat" (RPM 233), respectively. Bob Stanley of St. Etienne compiled the former and co-compiled the latter. Maybe some of you have those CDs. If not, I recommend them. My pal Clunkie is presently putting together a feature article for S'pop. So watch this space. In the meantime, I've posted a nice shot of Cheryl to the S'pop Photos section, which can be found here: http://photos.groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/lst Find an obituary here: http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,3604,1450723,00.html R.I.P. Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Sat, 16 Apr 2005 11:21:40 -0000 From: Billy G Spradlin Subject: Re: John Fred gone Gary Myers wrote: > John Fred & His Playboy Band had a regional following in the South > when they recorded their parody of the popular Beatles' song "Lucy > in the Sky With Diamonds," in 1967. Written by Gorrier and fellow > band member Andrew Bernard, "Judy In Disguise" was recorded in New > Orleans with the Fats Domino band ... Humm... that's interesting, Robin Hood Brians (Robin Hood Studios) told me via e-mail a few years ago that he recorded the entire song in his studio in Tyler Texas. (Which was built behind his parents house and still operating today). Really a shame to hear about his death, he was quite a legend in Lousiana/Texas and gave Shreveport's Paula Records their only #1 national Pop hit. Billy G. http://listen.to/jangleradio -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Sat, 16 Apr 2005 11:29:24 +0100 From: Austin Powell Subject: Claire Francis & Birmingham (UK) Groups First, welcome back Claire - we all wish you a speedy convalescence... U.K. Bonds, The Bulldog Breed and (I think) The Nightriders were all represented at the time they signed to Polydor by an agency in Birmingham called ADSEL - Arthur Douglas Smith Entertainments Limited. The company worked from offices in one of the city's high- rise office blocks at the time. Very plush. I believe another of the groups that came under the deal were Giorgio and Marco's Men who released "Girl Without A Heart" c/w "Run Run" on Polydor 56101 in 1966. There were about half a dozen bands signed to Polydor in the same deal... Were any of the others Claire's productions I wonder ? Austin P -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Sat, 16 Apr 2005 10:58:54 -0000 From: Billy G Spradlin Subject: Re: The Hollies' "Stop! Stop! Stop!" album Bill Mulvy wrote: > "Tell Me To My Face" is a great song that never appears on any > Hollies greatest hits CDs even though it was on a major greatest > hits LP in the sixties. What's up with that? Wasn't that "The Hollies Greatest Hits" LP on Imperial? That was another hodgepodge of singles and album cuts. It came out in 1967, maybe whoever compiled it included that song because of Keith's cover. > FYI "The Hollies 30th Anniversary Greatest Hits" album features > remixed versions of the songs which improves their impact. "Bus > Stop" is stunning with the vocals on both channels while retaining > the stereo separation on the instruments. "I Can't Let Go" is > great as well. The b-sides are also in stereo for the first time > on this collection. There's some remixed tracks on that set that sound great on headphones like "Baby That's all". But (remastering engineer) Ron Furmanek (who usually does fine work) blew it on the remix of "Look Through Any Window". I was hoping it would be simular to the mono 45 version but he butchered it by removing the reverb and turning down the background vocals. But until the (expensive) EMI-UK "Long Road Home" box set it was the most comprehensive Hollies compilation I had found. Billy http://listen.to/jangleradio -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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