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Spectropop - Digest Number 1899



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.


Topics in this digest:

      1. Today's Finds
           From: James Botticelli 
      2. Re: The Cyrkle
           From: Bill Mulvy 
      3. Re: Sunflower, the label
           From: Leslie Fradkin 
      4. Re: Lesley Gore & double tracking
           From: Anthony Arena 
      5. The TAMI Show
           From: Bill Mulvy 
      6. Re: Lesley Gore / Judy Craig
           From: Will Stos 
      7. Re: those darned Coxes
           From: Phil X Milstein 
      8. Re: Lesley Gore, "Hey Now"
           From: Joe Nelson 
      9. Re: Tommy Dae and the High Tensions
           From: MopTopMike 
     10. The Everly Brothers' "Two Yanks In England"
           From: Doug Richard 
     11. The Crayons, anyone?
           From: Stefano 
     12. Re: Bob Crewe productions & Worst Tape Edits
           From: George Schowerer 
     13. Re: Tom Austin
           From: Dave the Rave 
     14. Worst drop out on a CD
           From: Bill Mulvy 
     15. Re: Edits, etc.
           From: John Fox 
     16. The Marquee Review
           From: Frank Murphy 
     17. Re: Lesley Gore
           From: Anthony Parsons 
     18. Re: Bob Crewe productions & Worst Tape Edits
           From: Robert Pingel 
     19. Re: The Everly Brothers' "Two Yanks In England"
           From: Steve Harvey 
     20. Re: Double tracking
           From: Mike 
     21. Re: The Crayons, anyone?
           From: Tom Taber 
     22. Re: The Crayons, anyone?
           From: Mikey 
     23. Re: The TAMI Show
           From: Richard Fannan 
     24. Re: The Everly Brothers' "Two Yanks In England"
           From: Einar Einarsson Kvaran 
     25. Re: Today's Finds
           From: Robert Pingel 


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Message: 1 Date: Sun, 3 Apr 2005 17:42:55 -0400 From: James Botticelli Subject: Today's Finds I wrote: > Found yesterday: A 45 written by Jack Keller and Gerry Goffin, > flipside written by Al Kooper and Irwin Levine. Anyone wanna guess? > It's on Capitol. I will post later today all yesterday's groovy > finds! And the winner is..........NO ONE!!! The record written by Goffin/ Keller, flipside written by Kooper/Levine is..... Ernie Freeman - Where Were You (Keller/Goffin)b/w What Do I See In The Girl (Kooper/Levine) - Capitol, aLou Rawls soundalike. The rest of the finds: Gloria Dennis - Richie - Rust (great girlie song) Mitchell Torok - Pink Chiffon - Guyden (a hit from way back then) Elvis Presley - Do The Clam - RCA (from 'Girl Happy', always loved the pop side of Elvis vs the rawkin' side) Carol Kay & The Teen-Aires - I'll Never Change - Crest (Let it please be her, oh dear god!) Picardy - Montage - Dunhill (Soft Rockers take on a nice Jimmy Webb tune who also produced, arranged and conducted it) Paul Evans - Hushaby Little Guitar - Guaranteed (How did Paul get his voice to crack up an octave like that?~) Betty Rogers - When I See You Through My Window - Briar (Connie Francisish pop piece) Ronettes - How Does It Feel - Phillies (Best flipside record EVER. Covered in 1998 by Japan's Doopees) Buckinghams - Makin' Up & Breakin Up - U.S.A. (These guys really WERE garage before becoming blue-eyed soulish) Critters - Marryin' Kind Of Love - Kapp (Penned by Andreoli & Poncia AND Pomus, arranged by Jimmy Wisner, always a safe bet) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2005 13:34:03 -0500 From: Bill Mulvy Subject: Re: The Cyrkle I noticed that the mono version of the Cyrkle's "Don't Cry No Tears No Fears Coming Your Way" is different and better than the stereo version. I'm certainly glad I have the album, but I have no turntable set up to play it on! Bill Mulvy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2005 12:22:10 -0600 From: Leslie Fradkin Subject: Re: Sunflower, the label Frank Jastfelder: > I have a promo 7" of Tony Scotti (who later launched the Scotti > Brothers label) with a nice Bacharachesque song called "It Won't > Hurt To Try It" (SUN 109) written by Ken Alison. Arr. and cond. by > Tommy Oliver. Prod. by Oliver and Scotti himself. I knew the two > worked already together on Scottis LP for Liberty Records resulting > from his "Valley Of The Dolls" fame. But I had no idea who was > responsible for sowing the seed of the Sunflower label. Tony's single was quite nice. Not sure it made the charts though! Mack liked that tune quite a lot. I'm sure that's why it got a shot. Les -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2005 13:05:35 -0700 (PDT) From: Anthony Arena Subject: Re: Lesley Gore & double tracking NO! Double-tracking isn't used to mask poor vocals. It's a recording technique used to give vocals warmth and depth, and it makes the singing hipper and cooler. Spector often double-tracked Darlene, Lala, and Ronnie, but certainly not because they were poor vocalists by any stretch of the imagination. A bad singer won't be hidden by double-tracking, but a vocalist's weaknesses may, in fact, be amplified by it. You can camoflage a weak a vocalist by propping him/her up with excellent backing vocalists and blending the backing vocal track into the lead vocal. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2005 16:27:40 -0500 From: Bill Mulvy Subject: The TAMI Show Is the TAMI Show on DVD yet? Bill Mulvy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Wed, 06 Apr 2005 21:49:55 -0000 From: Will Stos Subject: Re: Lesley Gore / Judy Craig Phil M: > I wonder why she was double-tracked so often -- my understanding is > that the technique was usually reserved to mask the inadequacies of > far less talented singers than Miss Gore. Tony Leong: > You know Phil, I've noticed the same thing with Judy Craig of the > Chiffons--and she had a great sounding voice!!!! Same here. You can really hear it on "Easy To Love (So Hard To Get)." I heard a live version of "He's So Fine," from a Murray the K album on a tape I got from Michael "Doc Rock" Kelly several years back, and it was obvious Judy didn't need studio tweaking to reproduce her recorded sound. The backing vocals were very hard to hear though. Maybe it was just the style at the time. To be honest, sometimes a bad over-dub is very distracting. If the master tapes are available, can an overdub be stripped off? Will : ) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Wed, 06 Apr 2005 16:33:15 -0800 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: those darned Coxes David Walker wrote: > According to Alphabeat (1969) the Young Idea are Douglas Macrae-Brown > and Anthony Cox and are both British (with the former being born in > Florence Italy). Any chance the latter could be the same Tony Cox as the one who had been married to Yoko Ono? --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Wed, 06 Apr 2005 17:27:55 -0400 From: Joe Nelson Subject: Re: Lesley Gore, "Hey Now" Jim Allio: > My understanding of the recording of "Hey Now" is that the Sel-Sync > (sp?) process was used, in which a singer overdubbed their initial > vocal and it was delayed for a nanosecond, adding a bit of fullness > and a different kind of texture. Was it that quick? I thought that in the nanosecond range you were getting into phasing territory. Most delays of this type are in the millisecond range (i.e. Duophonic + 30ms). Joe Nelson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Wed, 06 Apr 2005 22:44:47 -0000 From: MopTopMike Subject: Re: Tommy Dae and the High Tensions --- In spectropop@yahoogroups.com, Ed B wrote: > > Tom "Diamond Hunter" Diehl: > > Can someone give me some information about Tommy Dae and the High > > Tensions? Ed B: > Tommy Dae and the High Tensions were from New Haven Ct. area if > memory serves me right. The group was based in Rockville CT, home of Gene Pitney. Tom Dae (pseudonymn for Frank Draus Jr.) began recording in the early pre Beatle era. His dad, Frank Sr., was a producer at some big NYC based label, which allowed him to get Tom recorded on some major labels. The High Tensions included Tom on lead vocals, both of their Hitt label 45's came out in 1966: Looking For A Summertime Girl/You've Got It Made (Hitt 6601/2) May '66 Poor Man/No Use Hangin' Around (Hitt 6605/6) Dec '66 "Summertime Girl" was recycled for release as the B side to the '67 Diamond label remake of "Itsy Bitsy...". Tom also sang lead but uncredited on a 45 by the Cirkit, "That's The Way Life Is"/"Six Page Letter" on the Jody label in 1967. Tom kept recording into the 70s under various monikers, including Tom Dae Turned On (really lame LP, but cool '70 single). Tom's musical style is all over the map, since his dad was obviously trying to get Tom 'on the charts'. There is a great surfy instro "Tampico Rage", from '64 on Hitt,credited as Tom Dae's High Tensions. The Glo label single is a 'teener' type sound, recorded at Al Soyka's studio in Somers, CT - an old refurbished movie theater. The 45 he croons with girl group backup (the Tensionetts) is awful (I'm being nice here...). Tom's voice reminds me of a 'whine-y' Sonny Geraci. Most of his records are mediocre at best. But the High Tensions Hitt label sides are killer garage ,except for the pop styled "Summertime Girl" and "Itsy Bitsy...". MopTopMike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2005 00:03:09 -0000 From: Doug Richard Subject: The Everly Brothers' "Two Yanks In England" Alan Gordon wrote: > My understanding was that Jimmy Page and maybe another Led-band > mate were also on the (Everly Brothers') "Two Yanks In England". The accepted story has always been that "Two Yanks In England" was recorded in England with much help from the Hollies and English side men like Jimmy Page. So it is curious to me that in the booklet that comes with the "Heartaches & Harmonies" box set, all the TYIE tracks (Somebody Help Me, So Lonely, Kiss Your Man Goodbye and The Collector) show that they were recorded at United Recorders in Hollywood with all of the cream-of-the-crop American studio players (James Burton, Glen Campbell, Don Randi, Al Casey, Larry Knechtel, Jim Gordon, etc). I'd like to get the real story on this. TYIE has long been my favorite Everlys album. I've got it on order at Collectors Choice. It's about time it came out on CD. Doug -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2005 18:17:20 -0700 From: Stefano Subject: The Crayons, anyone? I posted a message early last week, about a couple girl groups tracks I have on a cassette, but do not have info. for, namely one track called "Love at First Sight". Actually, I am not certain this is the title, but it starts ("The movie was ready to begin...I saw his face for just a moment", and then continues with "Oh what a night, it was love at first sight"). Anyhow, I just found a listing for a girl group called The Crayons, that recorded a song called "Love at First Sight" in 1963. Has anyone ever heard of such a group, or know if it's the same song? Apparently they released a couple singles on Counsel, that year. This is one of them. It's a very nice song, hence my dedication in finding info. on it. Thanks, Stefano -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2005 18:29:25 -0700 (PDT) From: George Schowerer Subject: Re: Bob Crewe productions & Worst Tape Edits Billy: What you heard on "Pity" by the Seasons may very well the original session vocal. Don't forget, in those days, on a three hour session (for four tunes), they had to record the vocal because overdubbing with union musicians was a no-no. The leakage of his voice into other instrument mics is most likely the cause. Then, his timing on the redone vocal may at odds with the session vocal. They never tried to carbon copy the previous vocal. The engineer on that date was probably Gordon Clark (deceased) or Lenny Stea. Regards, George Schowerer -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2005 04:33:05 -0000 From: Dave the Rave Subject: Re: Tom Austin Previously: > ... Tom Austin is still playing some gigs with the current edition > of the Royal Teens. Gary Myers: > Do they go as the Royal Geezers now? They are going to be recording a new cd shortly in Pittsburgh and actually toyed with calling the band "Royal Seniors". Dave the Rave www.davetherave.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2005 13:46:38 -0500 From: Bill Mulvy Subject: Worst drop out on a CD I nominate The Bloodrock 3 Cd put out by Renaissance Records for the most notable dropout award. One of my all time favorite songs "Jessica", has a very noticeable drop out within the last five seconds of the song. It reminds me of my old reel-to-reel recorder dropouts so it does have a certain nostalgia value to it. I just wish it was not on that song! Bill Mulvy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2005 18:53:44 EDT From: John Fox Subject: Re: Edits, etc. Since we're talking about bad tape edits/mistakes, how about the annoying drum pedal squeak throughout "Come Go With Me"? I guess WD-40 hadn't been invented yet. John Fox -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2005 07:50:28 +0000 From: Frank Murphy Subject: The Marquee Review The Marquee Review and What Good Tomrrow is a currrent play on the Northern Soul scene. Certainly Lenny Harkins plys it at the Caledonia Soul Club in Glasgow. A copy sold for $510 last November: http://www.popsike.com/php/quicksearch.php?searchtext=Marquee+Revue&x=25&y=7 FrankM -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Thu, 7 Apr 2005 03:43:11 -0500 From: Anthony Parsons Subject: Re: Lesley Gore Hi Artie: So you ran the Lesgor and Buffee Music companies? Amazing! I've always admired Lesley's writing and it's great to see how she progressed through her career into a very fine writer. Out of all the hundreds of artists and tens of thousands of records I've collected in my lifetime, she was my first musical love and remains my all-time favorite. There's a quality in her voice that has always touched my heart like no other. Just thought I'd mention though, that the original mono single versions of You Don't Own Me and I Don't Wanna Be A Loser were single vocal tracks. The double tracked vocal versions didn't appear until the stereo LPs came out. And most of her singles from I Won't Love You Anymore (Sorry) on were single vocals as well. Though Bear Family did put both vocal versions of You Don't Own Me on their box set, the single vocal of I Don't Wanna Be A Loser has not been reissued since the mono version of the Golden Hits LP. I'm hoping that Westside will correct this if they ever get around to issuing a two-fer of Boys Boys Boys and Girl Talk. In a perfect world, we'd see all of Lesley's LPs issued on CD with both mono and stereo mixes, much like EMI did for Cliff Richard's 40th Anniversary. Many of Lesley's records are much stronger in the mono mixes than the stereo ones and some are very different, especially when you get to the Bob Crewe era. I'm also hoping that someday the 19 tracks Lesley recorded for Mercury which Bear Family indicates are lost will someday be found. You never know! More Gore! Antone -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Thu, 7 Apr 2005 07:24:18 -0700 (PDT) From: Robert Pingel Subject: Re: Bob Crewe productions & Worst Tape Edits Re the Eddie Rambeau LP, I seem to recall a very bad edit on the song "I Just Need Your Love" right before the last verse. One of the worst edits I ever heard was on a song by Marv Johnson titled "Don't Leave Me". It's the flip side of his hit, "You've Got What It Takes". The horrible edit comes during the intro right before he goes into the verse. I went and bought another copy because I thought my record had a non-reparable skip. Arghh. Rob Pingel -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Thu, 7 Apr 2005 05:04:46 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: The Everly Brothers' "Two Yanks In England" Alan Gordon wrote: > My understanding was that Jimmy Page and maybe another Led-band > mate were also on the "Two Yanks In England." Fellow sessions mater, John Paul Jones, future Led bassist, was also on the sessions. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Thu, 7 Apr 2005 14:49:03 -0400 From: Mike Subject: Re: Double tracking Double tracking is used MOST to make a weak vocalist sound passable. That's why the producers of poor singers like Gary Lewis, Billy J Kramer, Fabian, Frankie Avalon, etc ALWAYS double tracked and triple tracked their vocals. Double tracking does not make a bad singers flaws more visible, it hides them. Mikey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Thu, 7 Apr 2005 11:49:42 -0700 (PDT) From: Tom Taber Subject: Re: The Crayons, anyone? Stefano: > Anyhow, I just found a listing for a girl group called The Crayons, > that recorded a song called "Love at First Sight" in 1963. Has > anyone ever heard of such a group, or know if it's the same song? > Apparently they released a couple singles on Counsel, that year. > This is one of them. It's a very nice song, hence my dedication in > finding info. on it. I did a little Google search, and found that the Crayons' "Love at First Sight" was #39 on New Haven CT's WDEE chart for September 30, 1963. Tom Taber -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Thu, 7 Apr 2005 14:50:33 -0400 From: Mikey Subject: Re: The Crayons, anyone? Stefano: > Anyhow, I just found a listing for a girl group called The Crayons, > that recorded a song called "Love at First Sight" in 1963. Has > anyone ever heard of such a group, or know if it's the same song? > Apparently they released a couple singles on Counsel, that year. > This is one of them. It's a very nice song, hence my dedication in > finding info. on it. Yes, the Crayons were mildly popular around 1963/4. I have their 45 of "Crazy Dream" and its a nice uptempo record. I understand it's VERY rare. So I'm happy i have it!! Mikey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Thu, 07 Apr 2005 11:27:21 -0700 From: Richard Fannan Subject: Re: The TAMI Show Bill Mulvy: > Is the TAMI Show on DVD yet? No. I saw somewhere that a European DVD was recently released with portions of the TAMI Show and portions of the TNT Show. It appears that licensing problems are preventing the TAMI Show from being released in its entirety. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Thu, 7 Apr 2005 12:42:08 -0700 (PDT) From: Einar Einarsson Kvaran Subject: Re: The Everly Brothers' "Two Yanks In England" Doug Richard wrote: > The accepted story has always been that "Two Yanks In England" was > recorded in England. The booklet that comes with the "Heartaches & > Harmonies" box set, show that they were recorded at United > Recorders in Hollywood with all of the cream-of-the-crop American > studio players (James Burton, Glen Campbell, Don Randi, Al Casey, > Larry Knechtel, Jim Gordon, etc). I'd like to get the real story > on this. This bunch of musicians sounds more like those who were on the Everlys' "Beat & Soul" album. Like you, I'd like to know the real story too. Einar -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Thu, 7 Apr 2005 12:09:35 -0700 (PDT) From: Robert Pingel Subject: Re: Today's Finds James Botticelli mentioned: > Ernie Freeman - Where Were You (Keller/Goffin) b/w What Do I See In > The Girl (Kooper/Levine) on Capitol, a Lou Rawls soundalike. I think you mean Ernie Andrews. Rob Pingel -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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