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Spectropop - Digest Number 1799



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Les Irresistibles
           From: Frank 
      2. Re: French recordings
           From: Frank 
      3. Re: Nanette Workman
           From: Country Paul 
      4. James Griffin (Bread) R.I.P.
           From: Patrick Beckers 
      5. Re: Nanette Workman
           From: Frank 
      6. Re: French recordings
           From: Eddy 
      7. Re: the dawn of Dawn
           From: John Fox 
      8. Re: Steff Sulke: "Oh What A Lovely Day"
           From: Barry Margolis 
      9. Re: Quebec Questions; Vince Taylor
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     10. Re: Bob Dylan PBS Special
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     11. Artie Wayne sighting (1974)
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     12. Re: The Chiffons' "Now That You're My Baby"
           From: George Schowerer 
     13. Re: Les Irresistibles
           From: Dave Monroe 
     14. Fading Yellow reviews
           From: Patrick Rands 
     15. Re: Roy Orbison
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     16. Re: Tina on Vogue Belgium, etc.
           From: Dave Monroe 
     17. Re: The dawn of Dawn
           From: Allan Rinde 
     18. Re: The Arkade
           From: Steve Fuji 
     19. Re: Ben Raleigh
           From: Artie Wayne 
     20. Re: Roy Orbison ?
           From: Artie Wayne 
     21. Re: Patty Michaels
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     22. Re: Bob Kuban "The Cheater"
           From: David Coyle 
     23. Re: Joe Brown
           From: David Coyle 
     24. "Sellevision"; Chuck Sagle; Stan Shulman; is Vinnie Jay Martin Vince Martin?
           From: Country Paul 
     25. Re: The Montanas' "Uncle John's Band"
           From: Gary Myers 


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Message: 1 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 08:13:44 +0100 From: Frank Subject: Re: Les Irresistibles Jesse: > I first heard Les Irresistibles' "My Year Is A Day" at a Dries Van > Noten fashion show here in Paris last year ... It was a huge hit in France, Jesse. N1. Frank -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 08:16:22 +0100 From: Frank Subject: Re: French recordings Artie Wayne: > ... "Je T'aime" by Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin ... To my > knowledge, it was one of the first French language records to > become a hit it the United States. Mikey: > Wouldnt "Dominique" from 1963 have been the first French tune > to make the American charts? Peter Lerner: > I think you will find that "Dominique" was Belgian. Artie was mentioning French language records, wasn't he? Frank -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 00:56:22 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: Re: Nanette Workman James Botticelli Re: Nanette Workman: > A few collectors around here have the Atco single from 1975 called > "If It Wasn't For The Money" by Nanette Workman. This is the first > thing I've ever heard about her. So she's Canadian, eh? Tres > interessant. Born in Mississippi, raised in New York, migrated to Canada. "If It Wasn't For The Money" appears on the US album, "Nanette Workman" (Big Tree BT 89514, dist. Atlantic). This LP has songs from her 1976 self- titled French-language LP (Pacha PAC 11203) and the ealier "Danser, Danser" album (PAC 11201, which contains a very credible "Lady Marmalade"). The instrumental tracks are the same, but the vocals are recut in English and the songs are remixed. I think all the above can be found at her website reissued on CD. Correcting an earlier error: the francophone "Donne, Donne" and anglophone "Save Me" are the same song (very different mixes). My other favorite track on the US LP is "Running Wild"; I forget the French title. Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 09:18:25 +0100 From: Patrick Beckers Subject: James Griffin (Bread) R.I.P. I haven't seen anyone mention it on this list yet, so I guess most of you won't know, but James Griffin, ex-Bread, died of lung cancer on January 11. Only 60 years old. I don't think I have to go into what James has meant to the world of music in the Sixties and the Seventies (and beyond). You will all know. A sad loss indeed. May Jimmy rest in peace! Patrick Beckers -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 08:22:31 +0100 From: Frank Subject: Re: Nanette Workman Denis Gagnon: > A few years later she hung around and sang with the Rolling Stones > and then she went to France where she sang with Johnny Hallyday (I > believe she was also his girlfriend). She also appeared in a very > successful musical called Starmania in Paris in the late 70's, > early 80's. She has been back in Montreal for about 20 years now. Round and round it goes! Starmania was written for and played by France Gall!! On the original soundtrack you can hear both Nanette and France together. Nanette was quite famous in France at the time a sort of legitimate rock/pop icon in the eyes of most French artists. Great lady. Frank -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 08:50:04 +0100 From: Eddy Subject: Re: French recordings Artie Wayne: > ... "Je T'aime" by Serge Gainsbourg and Jane Birkin ... To my > knowledge, it was one of the first French language records to > become a hit it the United States. Mikey: > Wouldnt "Dominique" from 1963 have been the first French tune > to make the American charts? Peter Lerner: > I think you will find that "Dominique" was Belgian. You'll also find that Jane Birkin was English, but "Dominique" was most certainly sung in French. Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 06:42:38 EST From: John Fox Subject: Re: the dawn of Dawn Jay Warner's "Billboard Book of American Singing Groups" says about "Candida": "With Hank Medress producing and Phil Margo (also of the Tokens) on drums it was almost a Tokens affair." Interesting, because Orlando's previous "hit" ("Make Believe" by Wind) starts out with the unmistakable sound of a Token (probably Jay Siegel) singing the "Wooh-oooh-oooh-oooh-oooh" part. I also always felt those two songs had a Drifters feel to them, a la "Save The Last Dance For Me", and figured they were written by Doc Pomus or someone like that. It turns out Toni Wine and Irwin Levine wrote "Candida", with another relatively well-known Levine (Joey) contributing on "Make Believe". John Fox -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 06:22:00 -0600 From: Barry Margolis Subject: Re: Steff Sulke: "Oh What A Lovely Day" Mike Bennidict: > Does anyone know about this person? I have 4 singles by this guy....two on Dial and two on Epic. I suspect he's from somewhere in the South, since his connection with Dial. While we're at it, does anyone know this great single: It Was Good While It Lasted b/w Super Heavy by Jimmy George (both sides written by Jimmy Georgantones) on Viva V-633. It's a really great single from 1967. Barry in Minneapolis -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 10:57:51 -0800 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: Quebec Questions; Vince Taylor Denis Gagnon wrote: > A few years later she hung around and sang with the Rolling Stones > and then she went to France where she sang with Johnny Hallyday (I > believe she was also his girlfriend). She also appeared in a very > successful musical called Starmania in Paris in the late 70's, > early 80's. She has been back in Montreal for about 20 years now. Was there much of a Quebec/Paris connection in the popmusic scene? For example, did many performers appear in both "countries"?; were there many French-language records that were hits in both?; etc. I've also been meaning to ask where Vince Taylor fit in, if he did at all, in the French pop/rocknroll picture. Curiosement, --Philippe M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 10:47:03 -0800 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: Bob Dylan PBS Special Bob Celli wrote: > There's a Bob Dylan film in the works headed up by Martin Scorcese. > I was contacted by a person doing research for the show. She asked > me if I could supply pics of Bobby Vee and the Shadows from 1959, > the period where Dylan was in the group for a few gigs. ... Do any photos of Dylan and Vee together exist? --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 13:05:02 -0800 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Artie Wayne sighting (1974) A trip through the ol' 'zine closet last night provided quite the chuckle when I chanced upon page 77 of the August 1974 issue of Rock Scene ("The Stars Backstage") magazine. Among the shots in a layout documenting an L.A. party in which Casablanca Records unveiled its first rock band, a modest little quartet called Kiss, is a shot of our own Artie Wayne, decked out in his finest Mack threads, alongside a fetching young lady and a Casablanca employee. See for yourself in the Photos section. Artie (if you'll still talk to me after outing this photo), Casablanca wasn't exactly known for its restraint. The full set of photos of this event make it look like a pretty wild evening -- hellfire, even Michael Des Barres was there! Now that the statute of limitations on '70s Rock Indulgences has expired, can you tell us anything else about it? Best, --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 11:30:26 -0800 (PST) From: George Schowerer Subject: Re: The Chiffons' "Now That You're My Baby" Donny H wrote: > I just received my "Where The Girls Are, Vol 6" yesterday and it's > a great CD. I was wondering why the Chiffons' "Every Boy And Every > Girl" is in mono; the 1970 LP is stereo. Also, the recent posting > to musica from the same LP of "Now That You're My Baby" is in mono, > although for some reason I think that one sounds better in mono. Donny: There is much confusion on some of these older sessions that WERE done mono. I was the engineer on "He's So Fine" (Chiffons), done at Allegro studios...and produced by Hank Medress/Tokens...yet recently I was told it was in stereo. Now, Allegro (at that time) wasn't stereo..so perhaps some of the older sessions were redone somewhere else (at a later date) in stereo in order to "update" the song to fit with newer stuff. In those days, there was only a fine line between demos and sessions for immediate release. I did 16 candles (as a demo) at Regent sound...and to this date have never heard it in stereo because it wasn't originally done in stereo. Who knows..but there is definitely confusion on some of the older songs, since the original studio sessions did not have stereo equipment. Realize, however, that many of the original dates were simply done as a 45 record release mentality...without even a hint of future stereo release. That's why some early stuff remixes in stereo, is so lopsided in the "stereo" spread. We only had (at best), eight tracks to work with...so much overdubbing was done and channels had to be mixed together before the final mix was accomplished....and all the while, only a mono release was the goal. Regards, George Schowerer -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 10:36:36 -0800 (PST) From: Dave Monroe Subject: Re: Les Irresistibles Jesse wrote: > I first heard Les Irresistibles' "My Year Is A Day" > at a Dries Van Noten fashion show here in Paris > last year (it was used on the soundtrack). It sounds > as if it would have been one of the biggest sixties > hit ever, although apparently it wasn't. A great, > forgotten song, of the kind that keeps lingering in > your head for days on end. Thanks for your response on this as well as on that Tina 45. But you know, I have a handful of 45s by the abnd, and I've spent so much time with "Universe of Love" (which is a b-side), I can't even recall any other tracks. But I do have that one, will haul it out tonight (osetnsibly my "mod" spin, but, in general, 60s). But does anyone have info on the band, where are they now, where were tehy then, and so forth? Thanks! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 15:38:53 -0000 From: Patrick Rands Subject: Fading Yellow reviews Here's some Fading Yellow reviews I wrote recently - enjoy! http://www.gullbuy.com/buy/2004/12_21/fadingyellow2.cfm http://www.gullbuy.com/buy/2004/12_21/fadingyellow3.cfm http://www.gullbuy.com/buy/2004/12_28/fadingyellow4.cfm http://www.gullbuy.com/buy/2004/12_28/fadingyellow5.cfm http://www.gullbuy.com/buy/2004/12_28/fadingyellow6.cfm http://www.gullbuy.com/buy/2005/1_4/fadingyellow7.cfm :Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 15:42:42 -0800 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: Roy Orbison Rob Pingel wrote: > Then Roy. Oh my God. String section, background singers, full band, > and a great percussion player who looked like he was having the time > of his life. To everyone's amazement, Orbison had not lost one iota > of power or majesty in his voice. He stood in the middle of the > stage, and blew everyone away with one devastating mini-opera after > another. Each sounded exactly like the recorded versions, only > BIGGER. I was fortunate to see Roy perform what must've been one of the last shows of his life, at a mid-sized, stand-up venue in Boston when he was still riding the wave of his most recent comeback. He was already 52 years old, yet the voice was, at least to these layman's ears, absolutely undiminished. As Rob reports, he played a very straightforward set, leaning primarily on his hits and in very similar arrangements and melodies, yet managing, somehow, not to come off like a human jukebox. He did, though, rely on one gimmick, but it was an incredibly effective one, and one ideally suited to his strengths. At the end of each of about half a dozen of his signature "crescendo" songs -- "Runnin' Scared," "It's Over," "In Dreams," "Crying," etc. -- just as the applause was starting to fade, Roy and his band would kick back into a reprise of the last verse and climactic finish, usually to an even bigger "top note" than in the full-length version. If I'm not mistaken, on one of those songs he even reprised the big finish a second time! The show left me in a rapturous glow that lasted for several weeks, ending only -- and with a rather thudding crash, at that -- about three weeks later upon hearing the news of his sudden death. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 07:48:40 -0800 (PST) From: Dave Monroe Subject: Re: Tina on Vogue Belgium, etc. Jesse wrote: > Unfortunately, I haven't quite figured out how to > magically transform vinyl into mp3s. Maybe Dave > could post Toc Toc Toc to Musica? I'll see if I can get more technologically advanced freinds to help me out on that. My record player alone is from 1959 right now, so ... > Now that this group has discussed French and > Canadian pop in some detail, maybe we can turn our > ears to the likes of Italy and Holland? > > My votes go to Bonnie St Claire (the best songs > somehow mix northern soul and proto glam rock), > Liesbeth List (who was Holland's answer to Marianne > Faithfull and Francoise Hardy and whose multi- > language repertoire is just amazing, spanning Serge > Gainsboug, Tim Hardin and Bob Lind, among others), > and, from Italy, Caterina Caselli (who did great > versions of "The Days Of Pearly Spencer" and "In The > Year 2525", as well as some great original songs, > most notably "Il Carnevale"). Eevry time I spin BSC's "Tame Me Tiger," I have to go out and find another ciopy of a recent reissue for, typically, female DJ friends of mine. Forunately, that come backed with "I Surrender," so ... but howzabout Q65? Minneapolis beat band The Funseekers (R.I.P.) used to do a storming cover of "Cry in the Night" (by the way, is he really singing "I've been wasting my coffee" at th beginning of the chorus? We acn't figure that one out ...). Shocking Blue (and note there Tom Jones' GIGANTIC cover of "Venus," as well as Nirvana's [Kurt Cobain ed.] Sub Pop Singles Club entry, "Love Buzz"). In the emantime, having that Nederbeat box set, I've been hoping for a copy of 'Sure, He's a Cat" by Teh Cats to cross my path, but, alas ... but any info on any European acts would be of help. Italy I don't know. Spain? Los Bueneos, Los Salvajes, The Satin Bells, et al.? Thanks again and again ... -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 19:23:09 -0000 From: Allan Rinde Subject: Re: The dawn of Dawn At the risk of stirring up another controversy, let me say that according to Tony, Toni and Jay (Siegel, not Warner), Ellie Greenwich was not on the "Candida" session or any of the sessions for the first album. For the curious, Linda November replaced an ailing Robin Grean on some tracks, including "Knock Three Times." -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 21:02:56 -0000 From: Steve Fuji Subject: Re: The Arkade Michael Thom wrote: > Here is the complete Arkade discography. All stock copies are mono. > > Dunhill 4235: Woman In My Life / Rhythm Of The People > Dunhill 4247: Sing Out The Love (In My Heart) / Susan > Dunhill 4268: The Morning Of Our Lives / Rhythm Of The People > Dunhill 4277: Where You Lead / Sentimental Lisa > Dunhill 4286: Fool's Way Of Lovin' / The Morning Of Our Lives > > Promos of 4268, 4277 and 4286 are stereo/mono A-sides, and are the > only releases of those songs in stereo. I'll post the stereo "Fool's > Way Of Lovin'" when I delete "Where You Lead." Hi Michael, Thanks for the info. I just started a new Yahoo group for Austin Roberts and I'd love it if you'd join. I'm still not sure of the protocol to post an invitation to a group, but if you are interested, send me an email at famesteve@yahoo.com with your email address and I'll send you a personal invitation. Also, I'd love to have a scan of the Morning of Our Lives" picture sleeve. Thanks, Steve -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 13:31:44 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Ben Raleigh "That Alan" ...How ya' doin'? You asked about my long time writing partner and friend Ben Raleigh. Well I met Ben, who was the lyric writer of hits like "Dungaree Doll", "Wonderful, Wonderful", "She's a Fool", "Love is a Hurting Thing" and one of my all-time favorites, "Tell Laura I Love Her" in 1962. We were introduced by one of my early mentors Paul Vance, who co-wrote "Catch a Falling Star", "Itsy, Bitsy, Teenie Weenie Yellow polka dot Bikini",etc. He brought Ben in to write with me and Danny Jordan [who later became one of the Detergents] who were recording as a duo, for Diamond records. Soon Ben and I just started writing together and started getting some good covers...Wayne Newton, Jack Scott, Leroy Van Dyke, Aretha Franklyn, Jose Feliceano, Bobby Darin. Ben introduced me to Freddie Bienstock at Hill and Range, who asked us to write for several Elvis movies, to Arnold Shaw at E.B. Marks music who got us a hit with Helen Shapiro in the U.K. and to Al Gallico at Shapiro Bernstein, who offered me a chance to become the first Black country artist signed to major label. At that time Ben was also writing with Jeff Barry, Ellie Greenwich, Sherman Edwards and Mark Barkan. I was lucky to have him on Wednesday and Saturday. Then in 1963 we wrote and I produced "Midnight Mary" for Joey Powers. I still can remember taking publicity pictures and being handed a gold record by Larry Uttal, who whispered, "Now this doesn't neccesarily mean it sold a million records!" We continued to write for several years and have covers by Dion, the Hues Corporation, Gene Pitney, Freddie and the Dreamers, etc. and when I was at WB Music We bought the renewal rights to his song, "Laughing on the Outside, Crying on the Inside". Two weeks before he passed away in 1997, we got together and updated "Midnight Mary". Originally, our Hero worked on the railroad...[and with apologies to Joe Nelson, who wrote recently that was his favorite part of the song] we changed the line to 'Just got a job at the Airport. Also in the new version, Mary gets pregnant. In one of my last conversations with Ben, I asked him, which of his songs has earned the most money? He laughed and said, "Scooby-Doo, Where Are You?" This was before the release of the Multi-million dollar making "Scooby-Doo Movie"...and it's equally sucessful sequel! regards, Artie Wayne http://artiewayne.com/ -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 13:42:58 -0800 (PST) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: Roy Orbison ? Rob...How ya' Doin'? You said that the version of "It's Over" that's used on the Blockbuster commercial is a Roy Orbison soundalike. It sounds to me like Roy in a rerecorded version...in his later years. Another Spectropop mystery unfolds. regards, Artie Wayne http://artiewayne.com/ -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 22:50:56 -0000 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: Patty Michaels Brent Cash asked: > Re: The Cowsill's manager who was focusing on them more than > Patty's recordings; would that be a guy named Leonard Stogel > or the Cowsill's father, "Bud"? I've seen both of their names > listed as having managed them. The former. As far as I know, Mr. Cowsill never managed any other bands than his family's. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 15:22:17 -0800 (PST) From: David Coyle Subject: Re: Bob Kuban "The Cheater" "The Cheater" by Bob Kuban and the In-Men is on Varese's "25 Beach Music Classics." So the original recording is supposed to sound this way? If so, it seems to have been a pretty bad mixing job. Or am I just being picky? Otherwise, it's one of my favorite "lost oldies" and the main reason I picked up that compilation, which turned out to be excellent overall. David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 15:49:13 -0800 (PST) From: David Coyle Subject: Re: Joe Brown I have a video of the 1964 NME Pollwinners Concert that includes a set by Joe Brown and the Bruvvers, performing "I'm Henry the Eighth" (pre-Herman's Hermits), "What A Crazy World," and an instrumental I have been unable to identify. Brown puts on an acoustic guitar and introduces the number as being from Bizet's "Carmen" and the title sounds like "Sep-guid-i-gus." He apparently mispronounces it as one of the Bruvvers shouts out "It's Sep-guid-i-tus, you nit!" I've not been able to find the actual title or spelling. Can anyone help? BTW, it is an excellent rendition, although I have since found that a lot of the performances in that concert were redubbed before the show was broadcast in the UK in 1964. Still, it is a perfect example of Joe's virtuosity, and ability to play some serious music as well as play up the cheeky Cockney chap bit. I see in December's "Mojo" that Brown has recently released a new CD, too. David -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 19:58:16 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: "Sellevision"; Chuck Sagle; Stan Shulman; is Vinnie Jay Martin Vince Martin? Rob Pingel: > Last night I was watching television, and noticed the new campaign > for Blockbuster's "no more late fees." Some clever advertising > agency picked "It's Over" to bring home the corporate message. An > ersatz Orbison soundalike can be heard butchering the crescendo. > Nearly broke my heart. Mine, too. Welcome to the new America, where everything is for sale. The use of existing music in advertising started in earnest a couple of years ago as a great way to hear undiscovered tracks that radio wasn't touching (for whatever reason). Now it has become a sellout for whoring out hits. One egregious example: Led Zeppelin for Cadillac. Talk about an oxymoron! (And Zep is hardly a personal fave.) One of the few upsides so far has been the rediscovery of the Kinks' "Picture Book" for HP. But I personally find the exceptions very rare, and co- opting The Big O is not one of them, in my opinion. I appreciate your comment, and hope others do, too. Tom D: > I've heard the name Chuck Sagle before....but no other name is > familiar to me...anyone got any info on these people? "Chuck Sagle and His Orchestra" had an very nice instrumental hit (of small-to-moderate size), an early favorite of mine called "Off Shore." It's a harmonica-led 6/8 "rock ballad" on Epic c. 1958, later covered in the 60s on Reprise by Leo Diamond. Chuck Sagle was an arranger, conductor and producer [b. 1929, Aurora, IL; in New York in the '50s, moved to LA after]. He was involved in the "space-age pop" realm, "just riding the percussion album bandwagon, but he summed up space age pop fans for many jaded listeners with the title of his album, 'Ping Pong Percussion.' (There's a 'Ping Pong Banjos' album Sagle can be blamed for, too.)" The preceding comes from http://www.spaceagepop.com/sagle.htm, where you can check out the rest of that story. More to our point, he arranged Gene Pitney's "Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" and a bunch of Joni James tracks among others. A search of Google will tie him into Carol Kaye, The Manhattans and much of the Rat Pack. Stan Shulman, who you also mention, was Ray Peterson's manager and a partner with him in Dunes Records. His name also comes up in connection with Etta James' "Greatest Gospel Hits, Vol. 1" from 2002. I checked out Vinnie Jay Martin now playing in Musica. Big production sound, with a lot of effort put into it, but sorry, I don't hear a hit. (Guess others didn't, either.) However, I wonder if this might be the same person as Vince Martin (real name: Vince Guiffuni) who was with The Tarriers (they had the first hit version of "The Banana Boat Song" (Glory 45-249), in an uptempo "hootenanny" style predating Harry Belafonte) and sang lead with separate label credit on "Cindy, Oh Cindy" (Glory 45-247). A later follow-up, "Katie-O" (Glory 45-252), sank without a trace. Vince Martin went on to do more folk-related work, but his roots were in pop. (I went to Ted Mack Camp with a herd of his brothers and sisters way back in 1958! And yes - *that* Ted Mack.) Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Thu, 13 Jan 2005 21:14:08 -0800 From: Gary Myers Subject: Re: The Montanas' "Uncle John's Band" Previously: > I was the Montanas' road manager and am trying to put the releases > onto CD ... Sorry I can't help in your search, but I wanted to let you know that I've always liked "You've Got To Be Loved", and our band used to do it back then. I suspect that there were not a lot of bands doing that one gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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