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Spectropop - Digest Number 1747



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 20 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: President Kooper
           From: Robert Pingel 
      2. Re: Kenny Young, The (other) Dickens
           From: Jeff Lemlich 
      3. Peter Noone for Thanksgiving
           From: Karen Andrew 
      4. Re: Little Pattie
           From: Steve 
      5. Welsh artists; harmonicats
           From: Clark Besch 
      6. Re: Little Pattie
           From: Lyn Nuttall 
      7. Re: Tracey & Kirsty
           From: Phil Chapman 
      8. Re: Bob Yorey
           From: Al Quaglieri 
      9. Re: more Bob Yorey labels
           From: Jeff Lemlich 
     10. update from Austin Roberts
           From: Mark Wirtz 
     11. Re: Donnie Elbert
           From: Dave Monroe 
     12. "Shangri-La's"; C. C. Adcock
           From: Country Paul 
     13. Shirelles - Lower The Flame
           From: Alan Holt 
     14. Re: Shirelles - Lower The Flame
           From: R Pfink 
     15. Re: more on Little Pattie
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     16. Re: the "other" Dickens
           From: Brent Cash 
     17. Re: Donnie Elbert
           From: Hans Huss 
     18. Imagine - Brian Wilson: The Making Of Smile
           From: Martin Roberts 
     19. Re: Welsh artists; harmonicats
           From: Clark Besch 
     20. Re: Donnie Elbert
           From: Ed Salamon 


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Message: 1 Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 16:53:56 -0800 (PST) From: Robert Pingel Subject: Re: President Kooper Al Kooper wrote: > I Love You More Than You'll Ever Know by Donny Hathaway was > magnificent, but they changed a key line in the song. "I could be > President of General Motors" was relegated to "I could be king of > everything" by producer Jerry Wexler, and I never have forgiven > him for that. I recall someone else changing that line as well. In 1981 you appeared on a telethon at about 3:00 a.m., and changed the line to "I could be president of the March of Dimes, baby". Wonderful ad lib. I was watching with my future wife, who had never heard of you prior to that. She became an instant fan. About a week later she found out you were playing at some bar on Sunset (across from the Whiskey, I think). We got there early and ended up sitting right next to the piano. You were terrific -- great show, with numerous guest musicians sitting in. Very memorable night. Do you have any shows planned for LA in the near future? Rob Pingel -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 20:42:33 -0500 From: Jeff Lemlich Subject: Re: Kenny Young, The (other) Dickens Good job with the Kenny Young interview, Brent ... and thank you for the credit for the Limestone Lounge. Very interesting story! Somewhere around here I have a couple of original '60s demos by Kenny. One is for "Slauson Street", which is likely the original version of the song he released as "Freddy Street" (on the B-side of "Mrs. Green's Ugly Daughter"). Another is called "Come On To My Party", which as I recall, has the original sheet music in with the demo. Now the task is finding these puppies! Jeff Lemlich http://www.limestonerecords.com P.S. It's so cool to see The Sandpipers and The Dickens side-by-side on the Spectropop Express front page. There was a DIFFERENT Dickens group that was based in Pensacola, Florida, and a member of that group, coincidentally, used to be married to one of the Sandpipers. If anyone's interested in hearing Florida's answer to the Left Banke, check out this small write-up on the Limestone Lounge: http://tinyurl.com/459jh -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Mon, 29 Nov 2004 19:43:29 -0800 (PST) From: Karen Andrew Subject: Peter Noone for Thanksgiving Larry Lapka wrote: > Peter Noone: One word: terrific! This guy is real good -- no > one should knock him at this point. This guy knows his place > in rock history and just goes with it. He's as exuberant as my > nine year old is. Larry is right about Peter! Returning home from the Thanksgiving weekend, driving through southeastern Indiana, I listened to a 3-hour-long British Invasion show on the radio. I think the station was out of Columbus, Ind. Well, this program was great! I have to rave about it. Peter Noone was the host, and he was perfectly cast. When I got home I looked up info on the show on the Internet, only to find that it was probably from 2003. So, I hope all of you have been able to hear it. From the Westwood One network: "Hosted by Hermanís Hermits lead singer Peter Noone, ... the special will focus on the British Invasion period in American music, featuring The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, The Yardbirds, Dusty Springfield, Petula Clark, Lulu and more. The special will also feature the segment entitled Swinging London, spotlighting influential areas in Britain with special contributions by Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, Roger Daltrey, Bill Wyman, Rod Stewart and Eric Burdon, among others. ... The Who, The Small Faces, Hermanís Hermits, The Dave Clark Five, Manfred Mann, The Yardbirds, Dusty Springfield, Tom Jones and others." Peter explained where "Mersybeat" came from, for example. Karen "Still Learning" -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 04:30:04 -0000 From: Steve Subject: Re: Little Pattie Paul wrote: > In 2001 EMI Australia released a compilation CD entitled 20 Stompie > Wompie Hits. I haven't seen the LP Mick refers to but the CD is a > good coverage of her EMI period. My favourite song is "Pushing A > Good Thing Too Far". The CD has 20 songs and it was budget priced. The LP and the CD are both the same. Some tracks on the LP were dubbed from vinyl. I'm not sure if this was corrected for the CD release or not. By the way, "Dance Puppet Dance" was written by Les Van Dyke. Does anyone know who did the original version? In 1969 Pattie also recorded "Gravitation", written by Alma Cook, which was released on the Aussie Columbia label. Again, I am completely unaware of the original recording. Can anyone help? Cheers, Steve -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 05:51:38 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Welsh artists; harmonicats Hi, have an odd request here. My nephew will be visiting Wales for school next semester, and wants a harmonica to take along and learn to play in his spare time. I would like to give him a CD of songs by Welsh artists, but only can think of Tom Jones and Van Morrison. Are those correct? Can anyone add any more? Also, I'd like to make up a CD of harmonica songs for him. He may not have heard the songs I'll use, but if anyone can supply a list at all, I'd be appreciative! Which Dylan, Neil Young, Donovan, Yardbirds, Van Morrison, Ray Charles, Hollies, Spoonful are best that feature harmonica? So far, I can think of: Billy Joel: Piano Man John Barry: Midnight Cowboy Crosby/Nash (?): Southbound Train Beatles: I Should Have Known Better; Love Me Do; Little Child Millie Small: My Boy Lollipop Marmalade: Rainbow Nino & April: Deep Purple Stevie Wonder: Fingertips; For Once In My Life Nitty Gritty DB: Mr. Bojangles Jan & Dean: I Found A Girl Offlist, of course, please. Thanks, Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 08:41:21 -0000 From: Lyn Nuttall Subject: Re: Little Pattie Paul Lewis wrote: > My favourite song is "Pushing A Good Thing Too Far". You took the words out of my mouth: "Pushing A Good Thing Too Far" is a gem. Its songwriting pedigree, of Crewe-Linzer-Randell, is first-class, and it originates from a fine recording by another Lewis: Barbara. I have a bit of a song history about it, at http://tinyurl.com/58xgp , but anything you can add/correct is welcome. According to my searches, the CD is available online, through http://sanity.com.au or http://www.topshop.com.au Lyn -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 12:36:37 -0000 From: Phil Chapman Subject: Re: Tracey & Kirsty Simon pleaded: > Surely SOMEONE on the list can help? Simon, you've been Spectrosearching. ... Yes, I recorded and mixed most of Tracey Ullman's tracks. I did a lot of '60s covers at that time and I was determined to capture the same excitement and 'magic' that the originals had, despite my apparent disregard for technical quality being frowned upon. DD's "Move Over Darling" was already one of my all-time favourites and on the TU session (at Olympic Studio 2) I drove the drummer crazy, (I think it was Terry Williams, pre Dire Straits) by pedantically revising the kick part from memory. Keyboards were generally played by Wix (Paul Wickens), who got a buzz cloning the Nitzsche strings. I seem to remember that "Breakaway" (recorded at Sarm East) was Wix's first session. A couple of years ago somebody here compared the versions of "They Don't Know". Here's my response: Tracey's version is a semitone up on Kirsty's, and, although Kirsty re-sang the backing vocals (the harmonies on the last verse are different), neither of them could get the "Baby" to sound as good as Kirsty's original, so it was pitched up and 'flown in'." > Also, is it just me, or are Kirsty's backing vocals actually > mixed louder than Tracey's lead vocal? Any insight would be > appreciated. Another of my habits from the early days was to mix for radio, usually monitoring through one small loudspeaker. Consequently, anything placed to the sides came out a little louder when listening in stereo, and I kind of like that. Also, "They Don't Know" is three-part harmony, if you include Tracey's melody as the middle part, and I guess I must have balanced them equally. And it all seems like only yesterday:-) PC -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 11:41:07 -0500 From: Al Quaglieri Subject: Re: Bob Yorey Al Kooper wrote: > My favorite obscure Laddins track was "There Once Was A Time", > also on one of Bob's instant labels although I don't recall which one > (just that it was light blue with black letters). The Laddins - There Once Was A Time / Oh How I Hate To Go Home (Theatre 111, the label's only release) Al Q. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 17:57:51 -0000 From: Jeff Lemlich Subject: Re: more Bob Yorey labels Hans Huss wrote: > I'm thrilled about the way the story unfolds. Bardell, Butane, Angie, > and now, thanks to Al Kooper, Theatre! And there are at least two more labels to add to the list: BYP (for "Bob Yorey Productions") and Yorey, the latter featuring The Marvells and The American Beetles. Jeff Lemlich http://www.limestonerecords.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 17:18:11 -0000 From: Mark Wirtz Subject: update from Austin Roberts Austin asked me to please let y'all know that his computer is messing up and he's been unable to receive or respond to e-mails (Claire's computer sneezed and Austin's caught the bug, I think). So, you'll need to either wait a few more days to communicate with him, or do it the old fashioned way -- shout very loudly! Best, Mark w. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 14:28:05 -0800 (PST) From: Dave Monroe Subject: Re: Donnie Elbert Hans Huss wrote: > Good to see Donnie Elbert mentioned on the list, he is truly > one of the unsung heroes! Ditto! Except that all I knew of him previously was his Northern Soul-ish cover of "Where Did Our Love Go?" (on All-Platinum), which I only just now learned was released in 1971. I'd been finding no end of cheap copies and giving them away to friends ... Dave -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 17:43:05 -0500 From: Country Paul Subject: "Shangri-La's"; C. C. Adcock I hope to be playing catch-up again later today -- miss y'all! I found a "Shangri-La's" page at a booking company that claims to have "original artists" -- http://www.2bproductions.net/artists/shangrilas.html. Obviously, we know better, but does anyone have any idea how these folks get to use the group name, and how they are connected to it? Martin Roberts, got the C.C. Adcock CD today; thanks for turning us on to it. The Jack Nitzsche-produced track is certainly one of the two or three best. This dude rocks! Not really '60s -- okay, not at all -- but there are roots back to New Orleans music (the album was mostly produced there), Bunker Hill's "Hide And Seek" and Leon Russell's Dylan cover "Hollis Brown" (stylistically), and Denny Cordell's son, who is involved. Thanks to everyone for keeping me up to date on the John Townley adventures. I promise to join you back in our regularly-scheduled era very soon! Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Wed, 01 Dec 2004 11:42:36 +1300 From: Alan Holt Subject: Shirelles - Lower The Flame Hi folks! I am just new on the list. I came across the website when I Googled for information on the Shirelles' record "Lower The Flame." I have been looking for this song for a while. It's not available on any CDs, and the only album I know of for certain that it's on is their debut album, which is an expensive one and and was never released in New Zealand, where I live. Does anyone know of any other way I could finally hear this track? Thanks! Alan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 19:40:42 -0500 From: R Pfink Subject: Re: Shirelles - Lower The Flame Alan Holt asked: > I am just new on the list. I came across the website when I > Googled for information on the Shirelles' record "Lower The > Flame"... Does anyone know of any other way I could finally > hear this track? It's on a two-fer on Westside, "Tonight's The Night/The Shirelles Sing To Trumpets & Strings" http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B00005KBJ7/ RP -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 30 Nov 2004 20:48:46 -0800 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: more on Little Pattie Lyn Nuttall wrote: > You took the words out of my mouth: "Pushing A Good Thing Too Far" > is a gem. Its songwriting pedigree, of Crewe-Linzer-Randell, is first-class, > and it originates from a fine recording by another Lewis: Barbara. I have > a bit of a song history about it, at http://tinyurl.com/58xgp Lyn offers an interesting factoid there about Little Pattie: "Real name Patricia Amphlett ... cousin of Divinyls singer Christina Amphlett." Oops, I left out a word. According to Lyn, despite the fact that the heart of her recording career came 20 years earlier, Little Pattie is the YOUNGER of the two! Truth is stranger, etc., --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Wed, 01 Dec 2004 02:24:40 -0000 From: Brent Cash Subject: Re: the "other" Dickens Jeff Lemlich wrote: > Somewhere around here I have a couple of original > '60s demos by Kenny. One is for "Slauson Street", > which is likely the original version of the song he > released as "Freddy Street" (on the B-side of "Mrs. > Green's Ugly Daughter"). Thanks for the link to the *other* Dickens group. I checked out the soundbite of that single and it is indeed more than a homage to The Left Banke. Like "She May Call You Up..." mixed with "Lazy Day." Other than the singer having a lower range than Steve Martin, it's pretty "dead on" for the harmony intervals they (L.B.) used, as well as the harpsichord. Very possibly it's the same song. Not only did some Resnick/Young tunes get retitled later (f.e., "Every Window In The City" = "I Found A Daisy In The City"), but some solo Kenny Young songs had a change as well (f.e., "Su-Su" = "Toom Toom (Is A Little Boy)". "Best Wishes"/"Blessed Fishes", Brent Cash -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Wed, 1 Dec 2004 03:41:36 -0800 (PST) From: Hans Huss Subject: Re: Donnie Elbert Dave Monroe wrote: > ... All I knew of him previously was his Northern Soul-ish cover of "Where Did Our Love Go?". There is a world of wonderful Donnie Elbert recordings to discover. A small list of must-haves would include: * What Can I Do - Deluxe 6125 (1957) * Have I Sinned - Deluxe 6148 (1957) * Run Little Girl - Gateway 731 (1964) * A Little Piece Of Leather - Gateway 757 (1965) (a mod classic, released by Guy Stevens on Sue in the UK) * Without You - New Wave 001 (UK) (1968) (re-released on Deram in 1969) * I Can't Get Over Losing You - Rare Bullet 101 (1970) * Where Did Our Love Go - All Platinum 2330 (1971) * This Feeling Of Losing You - All Platinum 2338 (1973) (A very haunting track, not on the 'Where Did Our Love Go' album) * You're Gonna Cry When I'm Gone - Bradleys 7501 (UK) (1975) Donnie Elbert also wrote Darrell Banks's 'Open The Door To Your Heart', one of the finest (Northern) soul sides ever. Interestingly, his 'You're Gonna Cry When I'm Gone' -- another fabulous but forgotten record, and well worth walking the extra mile for -- is the original blueprint for Shirley & Company's 'Shame, Shame, Shame', a worldwide disco smash in 1975. Donnie Elbert claimed he wrote everything but the words, using the chord sequence from George McCrae's 'Rock Your Baby', it's his piano playing on Shirley's hit version. Apart from his unique and beautiful voice, one of the attractions of his later releases, particularly those cut in England, is the fact that he played every instrument. Their simple, demo-like quality -- and the occasionally low budget-sounding keyboard strings -- may not be everybody's cup of tea, but it's a very addictive brand once you've acquired the taste. There are biographies on Donnie Elbert in Soul Survivor # 7 and Soulful Kinda Music # 13. Also, a surprisingly large number of the 45s mentioned above (along with many others) are currently available on eBay. HH -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Wed, 01 Dec 2004 16:35:39 -0000 From: Martin Roberts Subject: Imagine - Brian Wilson: The Making Of Smile Just a reminder to UK S'poppers BBC1, 10.35 this evening, "Imagine - Brian Wilson: The Making Of Smile". Be there or be square, Martin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Wed, 01 Dec 2004 19:05:30 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Re: Welsh artists; harmonicats Thanks so much to all who responded to my request. The Welsh site at http://www.geocities.com/Nashville/Stage/8089/ was of great help! The Amen Corner -- cool! Anyway, thanks so much for the help. Now about more harmonica songs ... Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Wed, 01 Dec 2004 20:28:15 -0000 From: Ed Salamon Subject: Re: Donnie Elbert Dave Monroe wrote: > ... All I knew of him previously was his Northern Soul-ish > cover of "Where Did Our Love Go" Donnie's Deluxe sides, including "Have I Sinned" and "What Can I Do", were huge for slow dances at Pittsburgh record hops. They're very unlike his later uptempos (which we also played, especially the Gateway sides recorded in the 'burgh), and I'm finding that a lot of Northern Soulers don't appreciate older R&B, but the Beach Music cats might dig them. Available on a CD from Collectables. Ed Salamon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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