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Spectropop - Digest Number 1694



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Engineer question for George
           From: Michael B Kelly 
      2. Re: Phil Spector reverb
           From: George S. 
      3. Re: 60s recording sessions
           From: George S. 
      4. Re: Linzer / Randell
           From: Mike Rashkow 
      5. Re: Fever authorship
           From: Eddy 
      6. Swingin' London record stores
           From: "pete_palmiere" 
      7. some thoughts on Smile show
           From: Phil X Milstein 
      8. Re: Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash?
           From: michael sinclair 
      9. Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash?
           From: Frank Jastfelder 
     10. Re: Heaven Scent jingle
           From: John Fox 
     11. new Ace CD; 2 Of Clubs; Brenda Lee
           From: Clark Besch 
     12. Re: Swingin' London record stores
           From: Mike Page 
     13. Re: Phil Spector reverb
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     14. Re: 60s recording sessions
           From: Joe Nelson 
     15. Re: The Other Voices
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     16. Re: engineer question for George
           From: George Schowerer 
     17. Re: A Touch Of Wirtz
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     18. Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash?
           From: Dieter P Wirth 
     19. Re: We Wrote 'Em And We Sing 'Em
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     20. Re: Phil Spector reverb
           From: George S. 
     21. Re: A Touch Of Wirtz
           From: Michael Sinclair 
     22. Re: Phil Spector reverb
           From: Mark Wirtz 
     23. A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash?
           From: Phil Chapman 
     24. Help needed with Cyan Shames/NC6/ & Shadows of Knight
           From: Max Weiner 
     25. Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash?
           From: Barry in Minneapolis 


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Message: 1 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 20:21:59 -0400 From: Michael B Kelly Subject: Engineer question for George George, On the end of "He's So Fine," when she sings "If I were a Queen, and he asked me to leave my throne, I'd do anything that he'd ask, anything to make him my own, 'Cause he's so fine!" She seems to either back away from the mike, or an echo is added, or something. Can you clear up this mystery I've pondered for 41 years? Michael "Doc Rock" Kelly The Rock 'n' Roll PhD http://www.DocRock.us -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 17:43:38 -0700 (PDT) From: George S. Subject: Re: Phil Spector reverb Freya: > Presumably Phil Spector used some kind of acoustical space for > reverb, does anyone know anything about what kind of space he > used and its dimensions etc? It was an unused empty room in the studio complex (smallish) at Mirasound (Hotel America 145 W.47th st. and now, a parking lot. George S. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 17:51:17 -0700 (PDT) From: George S. Subject: Re: 60s recording sessions Joe Nelson: > In the US in the early 60's, most recording was done on > three track. By the time the session was ready for final > remixing, you generally had the rhythm track on one, backing > vocals and orchestra on two and the lead vocal on three. First of all, stereo was not in the thoughts of many producers in the early days, and the mixes in stereo indicate just that. As time went on and second machines were available to the smaller studios, you had better control of things. Up to that point, the engineer had to be very cautious about what levels were maintained of the various parts, so that they would meld at the end. Frankie Valli's newer stuff was done on 8 tracks Ampex AG-300-8 and to preserve quality, I found it necessary to bounch using normal playback, which meant that all tracks except the final track had to be bounced to keep in sync. Not all of Frankie's sessions used vocal on the first tracks at all. You'd be amazed at how many bounces were done on that date.....and others. Earlier days, with the Chiffons (He's So Fine) were done on two Ampex 351 mono decks...and you had to work like the devil to keep things in perspective. Regards, George S. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 20:59:06 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Linzer / Randell Mike Rashkow: > and, for the Toys, they also wrote... May My Heart Be Cast > Into Stone, a great song (one of Phil C's favorites) and one > that Ms. Ellie Greenwich and I produced a decent cover of with > The Other Voices on Atlantic. Phil C. > Who exactly were the 'Other Voices', Mike? Did you and Ellie > produce their other 45 on Atlantic? You never did tell me what > comprised the 'whiplash' effect. I've played it to musica for > others to take a guess. Oh, and I've never quite pinpointed > the classical lift, any clues? The Other Voices were originally named The New Outlook. They were a male trio which included our member (so to speak) Paul Levinson, Stuart Nitekman and Ira Margolis. Ellie and I came across them singing acapella in Central Park. Paul wrote some decent songs (now he's a college prof and a well published writer of sci-fi and more). They sang well together--Stuart had kind of a big voice Jay and The Americans sound--he could have done Only In America We did two singles on them, the B side of one, written by Paul and my former wife Mikie Harris, "Hung Up On Love" was recently included on the Rhino compilation "Come To The Sunshine"--and that one was definitely another voices since I (sadly) ended up doing the lead. The above named song was one "A", the other "A" was the Brute Force song, "No Olympian Height". They were all done in one session, at A&R, Hutch Davie did the arrangements and Roy Cicala handled the board. The whiplash effect, after numerous attempts to do it with percussion was essentially multiple OD's of me going chusssshhhhhh as loud as I could, mixed to mono, e.q.'ed, echo'ed and then sync'd and spun in on the cues. The classical lift? Hmmmm. Not sure to what you refer. If it was in the melody it belonged to Randell, if it was in the chart it belonged to Hutch Davie--although E and Me might have sung it to him. Some lines we wanted included. I will take credit for the background voices (counterpoint?) or something like it in the bridge--and coming out of it-- to the last chorus-- that is Toni Wine and maybe Ellie actually supporting the high note-- the boys gave it their best, but....... I did the mix at Broadway Recording. What the hell, don't ask me questions if you don't want the answer --I'm old, lonely and no one listens to me. Di la, Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 08:27:26 +0200 From: Eddy Subject: Re: Fever authorship Me: > Cooley is NOT Little Willie John. He was a songwriter who also > recorded "Fever" once for the "We wrote 'em and we sing 'em" album. Phil M: > That album sounds interesting. Can you tell us a bit more > about it? >From Marv Goldberg's R&B Notebooks: In 1961, M-G-M released an album called "We Wrote 'Em And We Sing 'Em" (MGM SE 3912), containing songs written and sung by six songwriters. Each writer sings one hit tune and one new song (with the other writers doing back-up work). Included are: Billy Dawn Smith ("The Angels Listened In"), Eddie Cooley ("Fever"), Otis Blackwell ("All Shook Up"), Winfield Scott ("Tweedlee Dee"), Ollie Jones ("Send For Me"), and Lincoln Chase ("Jim Dandy"). >From both an artistic and historical viewpoint, it's an album worth having. M-G-M SE 3912 "We Wrote 'Em And We Sing 'Em" - 61 Billy Dawn Smith: The Angels Listened In//When I Saw You Otis Blackwell: All Shook Up//Music And Fire Eddie Cooley: Fever//Lay It On Winfield Scott: Tweedlee Dee//Some Cold Night Now Ollie Jones: Send For Me//Come On, Come On Lincoln Chase: Jim Dandy//Hot Biscuits And Sweet Marie Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 03:20:45 -0000 From: "pete_palmiere" Subject: Swingin' London record stores After a 7 year gap, I'm visiting London in Late December. I would love to get some record shops recommendations from Spectropoppers in and around the London area. I'm planning on browsing the bargain bins in Tower Records at Piccadilly Circus and the sacred bins of Virgin and HMV on Oxford Street - but I would like to investigate some more obscure used music shops. Any specific suggestions? Also, where can I catch the best LIVE music these days in Central London? cheers, Kurt Benbenek -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 23:29:17 -0400 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: some thoughts on Smile show A few thoughts on the Wilson/Smile show, which I saw Thursday night in Boston, follow below. I've restricted my comments to the Smile portion of the evening, although the prelude and encore sets were both quite magnificent in their own right. * I was skeptical going in that the show would be able to live up to its sky-high advance word, but from first note to last I was both moved and enthralled. Quite apart from the drama of the moment (given Smile's agonizing history), the performance was absolutely transcendent purely on its musical merits. * I especially enjoyed how organic the arrangements were, involving at times nearly 20 musicians when, by all rights, with modern technology they could've gotten much the same sounds from just half a dozen or so. Yet they neither skimped nor cut corners, quite an achievement in this bottom-line era. * The obvious cooperativeness and commonness of purpose of Brian's musicians this time around underscored one of the biggest impediments he faced during the album's original production. Music this visionary deserves every shred of support possible, and it's so fortunate that he's now able to surround himself with players who are able to give it to him. * I also appreciated the fact that the entire group seemed to be having such a great time up there. In fact, with the musicians and the audience as delighted as they were probably the one person in the whole building who wasn't smiling over Smile was Brian himself, but then smiling is not really his thing anymore. We can only hope that he's still able to do so inside. His blank visage, though, renders the great humor of his masterpiece rather ironic. * The highlight for me, and an example of the above, was "Mrs. O'Leary's Cow," which managed to be at once menacing and playful, a combination I could scarcely have believed possible. Another example came in a line from "Vege-Tables" which I'd somehow never quite caught before: "I threw away my candy bar and I ate the wrapper." To reveal the staging of either of these songs, however, could spoil the surprise for those who have yet to see the show. * Although Smile remains largely fragmentary, the sequencing and connectives passages created for this production were so organic, and so "correct," that they instantly seemed the ONLY ways Smile could ever have gone; in other words, the entire suite-of-suites sounded perfectly inevitable, which (so I was taught) is one of the fundamental requirements of great art. I don't know how involved Brian was in putting together those finishing touches, but since the show does bear his name, as well as his presence and voice, I think it's safe to interpret that as his acceptance of the final composition. It might not be exactly as it would've been had it been released in 1967, but whatever it is Brian has stamped as final. Thus, in lieu of any final 1967 version, the 2004 version IS Smile. * For the first time I noticed how cinematically inclined Smile is. By that I mean that all of its images the Old West, the Mexican cantina, the Pacific Ocean, the Great Chicago Fire, etc. -- seem filtered through their Hollywood incarnations. * I was also struck by how good Brian's singing was, in contrast to the show I saw him give in summer 2003. At first I had thought his parts were being doubled by Jeff Foskett, but at the end of show, just before introducing the musicians and beginning the encore portion, Foskett announced that he'd taken ill earlier in the day, and was able to sing only minimally. (In fact, he didn't even stay onstage for the encore.) * Finally, if I had his address I would follow through on Brian's solicitation from one of Smile's signature songs and say, "Dear Brian, "Green beans." "Best wishes, "Phil Milstein" -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 19:08:13 -0700 (PDT) From: michael sinclair Subject: Re: Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash? --- "Tom K. White" wrote: > > Mark W: > > I haven't a clue about this cover, but I > occasionally > > hear rumours about sampled cover versions, or > dance > > mixes, of T.O.V. > > Thanks for the info Mark, and the other Mark. > Interesting stuff, > to me anyway. Just wondering, as a pure > hypothetical, how would > you feel if one of your songs covered by this > licencing agreement > suddenly became a huge international hit either by > way of sampling > or another artist recording a cover? I would feel fine about it. My own original version remains the authentic first, and even I was unable to copy it when asked to do so for the "Come Back And Shake Me" Teldec LP in '69 - it was a sad mess. Also, just out > of interest, > was the original version of ATOVASOB a hit in > Germany (reissued on > the back of the Beat Club series perhaps?) or other > parts of Europe? Nope. A "turntable hit," but never a chart hit. Anywhere. > And do you remember anything about a German language > version of > "The Mighty Quinn" you produced for a guy called > Dave Colman? I have been credited as a producer on a number of older 45's which I had nothing to do with. This is one of them. In fact, I never produced any non-English language record - ever (even though I performed a couple of tracks in German for EMI/Electrola producer Nils Nobach, for whom I also arranged and conducted several German language albums). Best, Mark W -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 11:56:56 +0200 From: Frank Jastfelder Subject: Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash? Though it had been used for years as the theme song to the famous TV-show "Beat Club", ATOVASOB never reached the Top 100 in Germany. I'm not even sure if they put the song out as a single. But I own a copy of John Schroeder's City of Westminster String Band LP with the song on it. Great version with a funky bass at the bottom and a trumpet (probably played by Ray Davis) replacing the female chorus. Frank J. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 00:37:58 EDT From: John Fox Subject: Re: Heaven Scent jingle Clark Besch wrote: > Now to Musica as "filler" material, I give a 1967 Heaven Scent > jingle! Does anyone out there have a better quality or different > version they can share with me? I think we've been this way once before, but the "classic" Heaven Scent jingle can be found on the May 18, 1968 aircheck from the Real Don Steele show. Link is as follows; jingle is about 37 minutes in: http://www.reelradio.com/rdsc/airchecks.html John Fox -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 05:32:28 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: new Ace CD; 2 Of Clubs; Brenda Lee I've been reading about the new Ace CD with "Walk Tall" by The 2 Of Clubs on it. Can anyone (Mick?) tell me if it is in stereo, and from tape source? It is a great record that sounds great in stereo, but could sound even better if from a stereo master tape! Also, there is a small blurb on Ace's website about an upcoming Brenda Lee CD. Can anyone tell me if "Think" is on it, and if so whether it is in stereo? Does anyone have the "Too Many Rivers" LP with this song in true stereo? I only have a mono copy, and always wondered if it was in stereo on the stereo LP? Thanks, Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 17:59:28 +0100 From: Mike Page Subject: Re: Swingin' London record stores Kurt Benbenek wrote: > After a 7 year gap, I'm visiting London in Late December. > I would love to get some record shops recommendations > from Spectropoppers in and around the London area. The Tower record shop at Piccadilly Circus is now a Virgin megastore. Still worth a look, though. There are some good secondhand record shops in Berwick St, the market end. I'm not sure on best way to get there, but if you are at Piccadilly Circus, it's not far from there. Mike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 13:11:34 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Phil Spector reverb George Schowerer wrote: > It was an unused empty room in the studio complex (smallish) at > Mirasound (Hotel America 145 W.47th st., and now a parking lot). George, isn't that a long way from Gold Star :-)? Rashkovksy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 13:42:57 -0400 From: Joe Nelson Subject: Re: 60s recording sessions George Schowerer wrote: > First of all, stereo was not in the thoughts of many producers > in the early days, and the mixes in stereo indicate just that. Certainly they got the best they could under the circumstances. Mono was the standard obviously, and track layouts were geared to maximum flexibility in the final dubdown. In mono you treated the three tracks like three subgroups of musicians and blended them into each other. In stereo you had two distinct channels of sound, and stereo was about hearing a difference, so there it was. Al Kooper has shared his nightmares of ping-ponging overdubs and no doubt you have similar memories. If you had three tracks it was good, but four were better, and eight-track must have been like heaven. Who knows what your reaction would have been to a vision of today's sessions, with two or more 24-track machines locked together via SMPTE! This is part of the reason I've always rated Norman Smith at EMI UK over Geoff Emerick. Emerick, for all of his poineering work, never had to deal with the nightmare that it must have been to work where overdubs were tape copies with new audio mixed in on the fly, then edited together into a single pass in which God help you if the levels and EQs got out of synch. In that context, the question stops being "could Smith have engineered Sgt. Pepper" and starts to be "could Emerick have handled Please Please Me". Joe Nelson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 13:28:33 +0000 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: The Other Voices Mike Rashkow wrote: > The whiplash effect, after numerous attempts to do it with > percussion was essentially multiple OD's of me going > chusssshhhhhh as loud as I could, mixed to mono, e.q.'ed, > echo'ed and then sync'd and spun in on the cues. I used to think the Velvet Underground's banana album or The Shaggs' "Philosophy Of The World" was the one session I'd wish to have been at had I been born the proverbial recording studio fly. But now I am certain it is this one, if only for the ludicrous sight of Rashkow struggling to make his verbal utterances sound like the crack of a whip! Yeah, --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 11:37:38 -0700 (PDT) From: George Schowerer Subject: Re: engineer question for George Doc Rock asked: > On the end of "He's So Fine," when she sings "If I were a Queen, > and he asked me to leave my throne, I'd do anything that he'd ask, > anything to make him my own, 'Cause he's so fine!" She seems to > either back away from the mike, or an echo is added, or something. > Can you clear up this mystery I've pondered for 41 years? I'd have to play it again, because I have no idea. Regards, George S. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 14:13:28 +0000 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: A Touch Of Wirtz Mark Wirtz wrote: > I have been credited as a producer on a number of older 45s > which I had nothing to do with. This is one of them. In fact, I never > produced any non-English language record - ever (even though I > performed a couple of tracks in German for EMI/Electrola producer > Nils Nobach, for whom I also arranged and conducted several > German language albums). Mark, if I'm not mistaken you are German to begin with. I'm curious how old you were when you moved to England, and, if you care to go into it, the reasons and/or conditions under which you did. I realize this may be a bit off-topic, but since you're such a prominent member of the Spectropop community I figured a bit of your backstory might be of interest to us all. Thanks, --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 14:41:48 EDT From: Dieter P Wirth Subject: Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash? Frank Jastfelder: > Though it had been used for years as the theme song to the > famous TV-show "Beat Club", ATOVASOB never reached the Top 100 > in Germany. I'm not even sure if they put the song out as a single. They did! Issued with various "art"-covers. One of them being the Beatclub-logo. Dieter Wirth -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 14:56:48 +0000 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: We Wrote 'Em And We Sing 'Em Eddy Smit provided: > M-G-M SE 3912 "We Wrote 'Em And We Sing 'Em" - 61 > Billy Dawn Smith: The Angels Listened In//When I Saw You > Otis Blackwell: All Shook Up//Music And Fire > Eddie Cooley: Fever//Lay It On > Winfield Scott: Tweedlee Dee//Some Cold Night Now > Ollie Jones: Send For Me//Come On, Come On > Lincoln Chase: Jim Dandy//Hot Biscuits And Sweet Marie Thanks, Eddy -- that sounds like a very cool record. Anybody here have it? I'm sure we'd all love to hear Eddie Cooley's version of "Fever", among others included there. By the way, that last number listed, Lincoln Chase's "Hot Biscuits And Sweet Marie", is undoubtedly the same song as done by NRBQ, found on their exceptional 1979 "Kick Me Hard" LP. Drummer Tom Ardolino is one of the world's biggest Lincoln Chase fans, so the cover version stands to reason. (And if you ever catch NRBQ live, try to pull Tom aside between sets and ask him to tell you his Lincoln Chase story!) --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 15:35:03 -0700 (PDT) From: George S. Subject: Re: Phil Spector reverb Mike Rashkow wrote: > George, isn't that a long way from Gold Star :-)? Mike: Don't forget, Mirasound was, at that time, a very small, independent studios, without the funds of the larger record companies. Mirasound, before I got there, was running with two Ampex 350-2's and a mono 350. Then we turned the tables on the industry by designing the first 16 track recorder and became one of the busiest studios (independent) in NYC. Regards, George S. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 14:25:37 -0700 (PDT) From: Michael Sinclair Subject: Re: A Touch Of Wirtz Phil M: > Mark, if I'm not mistaken you are German to begin with. > I'm curious how old you were when you moved to England, > and, if you care to go into it, Where I am from is a matter of debate: I was born in Strasbourg, Alsace Loraine -- a boarder province forever-in-escrow, claimed by whoever won which war... sometimes Germany, sometimes France, Germany, France, Germany... Consequentially, Alsatiens (including me) consider themselves to be neither German, nor French, but simply Alsatien. I grew up in Cologne, Germany (ze humor capital of ze vorld), where I was a complete misfit. Then, I moved to England (on my own) a couple of days prior to my 18th birthday, where I felt instantly at home. Even though I arrived without being able to speak a word of English (having been tortured by Latin and ancient Greek at school), I knew I had the hang of it when, after 3 months, I had my first dream totally in English (without sub-titles). How had I learned? 1) Feverishly arguing with Ray Davies at Croydon's Fairfield (Art) College over our severely differing music preference (Ray into hard-core R&B [Muddy Waters], and I into Spector, Neil Sedaka and Goffin-King stuff); 2) Glued to comedy records and TV shows by Tony Hancock, The Goons, Shelly Berman, Charlie Drake, etc.; 3) Watching every movie that came out. It was during my time at Fairfield (I later moved over to Reigate's School Of Art) when I wrote my first song (in English), "Click Clack Goes My Heart." Not a masterpiece, but it was a start. At Reigate, I formed "The Beatcrackers," and the rest is sorta kinda history... Thanks for asking. Now I feel even older, so screw you! (Just kidding!) Warm best, Mark W ;) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 23:08:36 -0000 From: Mark Wirtz Subject: Re: Phil Spector reverb George Schowerer wrote: > It was an unused empty room in the studio complex (smallish) at > Mirasound (Hotel America 145 W.47th st., and now a parking lot). Mike Rashkow: > George, isn't that a long way from Gold Star :-)? Mike, I think what George means is that the board and the machines were in the unused room, and the reverb chamber was the parking lot. I think. Mark W ;) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Wed, 20 Oct 2004 01:06:27 +0100 From: Phil Chapman Subject: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash? Mark W: > Funny, to think that I wrote and arranged the thing as a filler > (on my now fabled banjo with the pipe tremolo arm) two hours > before the first Mood Mosaic session back in 1965. Such is the nature of genius, Mark:-) Thanks to the internet, I'm constantly discovering that many success stories are merely happy accidents, and that creatives are not always willing to acknowledge the simplicity of their achievement. Just how many flips turned into hits? (I feel a Phil M style list coming on) - I can only think of a couple right now, "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" and, if rumour is to be believed, "To Know Him Is To Love Him". Ironically, early achievers often seemed destined to struggle later; such is life! Anyway, little did you realise that in that moment of inspiration you had perfectly encapsulated the spirit of the swinging sixties, UK. Whenever I hear (the original) TOV I am immediately transported back to my portable transistor radio, permanently tuned to the pirates. I think I'll give TOV a spin right now. It would sit comfortably in the soundtrack of "Alfie" or "Up The Junction". Tremolo banjo, eh? - I often wondered what that was. How does it feel to have a cult following? Phil C. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 07:18:33 -0700 (PDT) From: Max Weiner Subject: Help needed with Cyan Shames/NC6/ & Shadows of Knight Good Morning to all; I was wondering if you folks could help me. I am setting up a music room in my new place & I am setting up an area dedicated to the Chicago Sound of the 60's. What I am looking for are any pictures or posters of the New Colony 6, the Cryan Shames & the Shadows of Knight. I already have the Buckinghams. If anybody out there has any posters or pictures of these three groups that they would like to sell please let me know off-list, as I haven't had much luck on E-Bay. Thanks much in advance, folks! max w. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 17:54:23 -0500 From: Barry in Minneapolis Subject: Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash? Mark W: > I have been credited as a producer on a number of older 45's > which I had nothing to do with. Didn't you produce your own German version of "Shy Boy"?? Barry in Minneapolis -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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