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Spectropop - Digest Number 1693



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Fever authorship
           From: Steve Harvey 
      2. Re: Early days in the UK pop record industry
           From: Barry 
      3. Re: '60s recording sessions
           From: Barry 
      4. Re: Fever authorship
           From: Phil X Milstein 
      5. Re: Melinda Marx
           From: Phil X Milstein 
      6. Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash?
           From: Mark Frumento 
      7. "Fever"; Mary Ann Mobley
           From: Country Paul 
      8. Re: observation from Smile show
           From: Mark Frumento 
      9. Re: Girl Group songs about the Beatles - The Whippets
           From: Andres 
     10. Re: '60s recording sessions
           From: Steve Harvey 
     11. Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash?
           From: Michael Sinclair 
     12. Spanky And Our gang
           From: JK 
     13. New jingles to Musica
           From: Clark 
     14. Re: David Pomerantz
           From: Mark Wirtz 
     15. Attn; Nashville S'poppers
           From: Ed Salamon 
     16. Re: 60s recording sessions
           From: Phil Chapman 
     17. Re: Fever authorship
           From: George S. 
     18. Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash?
           From: Tom K. White 
     19. Re: '60s recording sessions
           From: George S. 
     20. Re: New jingles to Musica
           From: Austin Roberts 
     21. Re: '60s recording sessions
           From: George S. 
     22. Re: 60s recording sessions
           From: Joe Nelson 
     23. Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash?
           From: Michael Sinclair 
     24. Re: Linzer / Randell
           From: Phil Chapman 
     25. Phil Spector reverb
           From: Freya 


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Message: 1 Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 19:10:01 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Fever authorship Thanks for clearing this up! I mean it. I always wondered why Otis Blackwell had the tune on his LPs, but never saw his name there. Only at Spectropop! Steve Harvey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 18:05:52 -0500 From: Barry Subject: Re: Early days in the UK pop record industry Frank Murphy wrote: > Here's an article by Alan Warner which explains quite a bit > about the UK music scene in the early sixties. > http://tinyurl.com/4u4wc That's a really cool article of the state of affairs in the UK just prior to The Beatles and all the beat-mania. Barry In Minneapolis -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 18:01:45 -0500 From: Barry Subject: Re: '60s recording sessions George Schowerer wrote: > Hello: I'm the recording engineer/mixer for many of the 60s rock > sessions..........I hope I can be of assistance in answering any > questions you might have.......... Did you work at Bell Studios in NY? Barry in Minneapolis -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 22:38:12 -0400 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: Fever authorship Eddy Smit wrote: > Cooley is NOT Little Willie John. He was a songwriter who also > recorded "Fever" once for the "We wrote 'em and we sing 'em" album. > Davenport is none other than Otis Blackwell, who used his > stepfather's surname as a pseudonym to avoid legal issues. That album sounds interesting. Can you tell us a bit more about it? --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 00:26:23 -0400 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: Melinda Marx In response to somebody's request for a photo of Melinda Marx, I have posted one, shot directly from my TV screen, to the Photos section. She is singing "Is This What I Get," although I believe the appearance in this case was on Shivaree. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 03:38:11 -0000 From: Mark Frumento Subject: Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash? Tom K. White wrote: > Hey mis amigos, I was just wondering, has anyone (particularly > Mark Wirtz) heard the new version of The Mood Mosaic's "A Touch > Of Velvet, A Sting Of Brass" that's going about? Surprised Mark hasn't answer this yet. He'll have to cover the facts about the money, but yes, J. Ferdy is one of his (many) aliases. I do know about a German dance version by Beatclub from 1999, but I think the one you have here is different. It's a great song and it doesn't surprise me that it would still get covered. Though, as far as I know, no version has ever been a chart hit. Am I right? If so that's an amazing fact in itself. Mark F. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 02:03:38 -0400 From: Country Paul Subject: "Fever"; Mary Ann Mobley Phil X Milstein, Re: Fever authorship: > Most versions of "Fever" that I've seen credit the composition > to "Eddie Cooley" and "John Davenport". Were these pseudonyms > for Little Willie John? If not, anyone know who they are? By way of introduction, here's one Bopper Bob Hennessy at http://www.bigbobh.net/dowop/priscilla.htm with a little background on: "PRISCILLA by Eddie Cooley and The Dimples "Eddie Cooley wrote Priscilla back in 1956 and recorded it on Royal Roost Records [#621] along with three unnamed ladies called 'The Dimples.' The song reached number 20 on the charts on November 24, 1956. Cooley also co-wrote the standard 'Fever' with Otis Blackwell." Here are a couple of excerpts from an interview with the late Otis Blackwell in Time Barrier Express, July 1979 http://www.kyleesplin.com/jllsb/JLLSBDIR/pages/68apage.htm TBE: ...Your next music involvement was with Eddie Cooley and "Fever"? OB - There was a group I became friendly with. One of its members Eddie Cooley, wasn't a singer then, we just wrote songs for the group. When the group broke up, he went back to the diamond business. It paid 180 dollars a week, so we had an agreement to write songs together and I would come to New York to hustle them and he would split his weekly pay with me. That enabled me to get around and meet people, the publishers, record companies, to hustle whatever songs we could a $25 advance for. A friend took me to Henry Glover at King Records to play a few songs - "Fever" was one. We got a few dollars advance and when it became a hit it made us professional writers. I guess. TBE Why does the song credit John Davenport instead of Otis Blackwell? OB - Since it seemed [Joe] Davis [who had signed Blackwell to a "lifetime" contract and then stiffed him] wasn't going to live up to his agreement for $50 a week, he definitely didn't want to give me a release from the contract, and I knew nothing about going to lawyers or BMI or ASCAP or any of the agencies that would have be able to help me. I began to write under my stepfather's name, John Davenport. I felt that if the publishing went through Joe Davis I wouldn't see any of the royalties. TBE - Is it true that Little Willie John didn't want to do "Fever"? OB - That's what Henry Glover tells me. It wasn't the type of thing Willie was doing it the time, he didn't like the finger snapping. Finally Henry convinced him to record the song and they went in that night and did it. TBE: ...[Y]ou also had Eddie Cooley and The Dimples with "Priscilla". That was quite a successful period for you. OB - We wrote "Priscilla" at the same time as "Fever". A lot of my titles used to come from the comics. Priscilla was a little girl in the Daily News. I convinced Jack Hook, of Royal Roost [primarily a jazz label], to record Eddie Cooley, He and his partner Teddy Reed were doing a jazz session and he had Eddie Cooley and the two girls and me come up at the end to record this. The musicians had never done anything like this before and Teddy didn't know what the hell was going on. But Jack dug the song and I guess he thought he could do something because he was real tight with Alan Freed. It was real funny man, 'cause when they started doing the song, Teddy said, 'God! What is this?" and got up and left! And this additional footenote from Jerry Osborne: "Eddie Cooley could be the definition of a one-hit wonder, having no charted titles before or after 'Priscilla.' Fortunately for his bank account, he also wrote, and has over 50 pop songs in his portfolio. His best known composition is 'Fever,' which BMI honors as a Two-Million Performance Song". There's also a German version of the song, entitled "Fieber", by Cindy Ellis on a very early Bert Kaempfert production on Polydor; Ellis had an international hit in German with "Do You Think Of Me", released in the US on Laurie about the time of Ivo Robic's massive smash, "Morgen". Bob Rashkow: > IMHO "For Singles Only", which I caught on late-night TV back > in the 70s, is a simple-minded film, riddled with typical > cliches from the period. That said, it's fun to watch these > days merely for the nostalgia factor, and of course, for L&CE > and any other artists who perform in it! Mary Ann Mobley > provides some "entertainment", I suppose.... FYI, this former Miss America (1959) had a very pretty duet hit with Jimmy Clanton, "Down The Aisle" (Ace 617, 1961), a teenage ballad which was, to my ears, quite effective and which remains a guilty pleasure to this day. (It would actually be perfect for Ace's "Teenage Crush" series.) With its lush orchestration, it is certainly about as far away from swamp pop as teen-idol Clanton got, but I have a Clanton CD that proved that he could really rock when he wanted to. Mobley also did two Elvis movies in '65 (Harum Scarum, Girl Happy) and married actor Gary Collins in 1967. More bio and a photo of the picture sleeve (about halfway down the page, claiming the B-side as the A-side) at http://elviswomen.greggers.net/mobleymaryann.htm A movie-and-TV-oriented bio is at http://us.imdb.com/name/nm0595039/bio Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 03:46:39 -0000 From: Mark Frumento Subject: Re: observation from Smile show Brent Cash wrote: > The one with the mohawk under > his baseball cap proved it when he,with fist pumping in the air, > shouted perfectly in time with Brian's vocal: "Over and over, the > crow cries uncover the cornfield!" Now,isn't that beautiful! Yes! A couple of weeks ago, on my way home from a work, a guy in the car next to me had 'Wonderful' blasting from his speakers. A very surreal scene for sure. While I'm not expecting Smile to change modern pop back to something better, at least I hope it attracts more people to the music of The Beach Boys. By the way, what DOES "Over and over, the crow cries uncover the cornfield" mean? (Sorry, had to say it!). Mark F. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 08:53:29 -0000 From: Andres Subject: Re: Girl Group songs about the Beatles - The Whippets previously: > The Whippets, "Go Go Go with Ringo"/"I Want to Talk with You", > Josie 921. "Go Go Go...": midtempo with banjo(!) and whistling (!!). Check out Musica for the B-side of this single by the Whippets. Sounds a bit like "There Goes The Boy I Know With Mary", but still good. Andres -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sun, 17 Oct 2004 19:15:04 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: '60s recording sessions George Schowerer wrote: > Hello: I'm the recording engineer/mixer for many of > the 60s rock sessions produced by Bob Crewe, Welcome, George, and start talking! Tell me about Mickey Baker. Since I got back into guitar I have been searching out his CDs. His guitar instructional book, which first came out in the '50s, is still in print today. Steve Harvey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 08:01:35 -0700 (PDT) From: Michael Sinclair Subject: Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash? Tom K White: > Hey mis amigos, I was just wondering, has anyone (particularly > Mark Wirtz) heard the new version of The Mood Mosaic's "A Touch > Of Velvet, A Sting Of Brass" that's going about? I came accross > it on a German compilation the other day, and had to check it out. Hello Tom, Thanks for the tip. I haven't a clue about this cover, but I occasionally hear rumours about sampled cover versions, or dance mixes, of T.O.V. The master of T.O.V. was part of my pre-EMI "Colinio Productions" catalogue, which was purchased as a package by RPM Records a few years ago. I therefore do not have any sales/rights/or sub-licensing revenue participation as producer/artist. To the best of my knowledge, RPM's Mark Stratford has been very conscientious in his rights and license granting of the product, but he, too, has to make a living. Thus, a rip or two might slip by. As the composer of TOV (under the name of J.Ferdy) my publishing rights and income has been protected through the years by Bourne Music (an exceptionally honest and legitimate publisher) as well as BMI/GEMA. Typically, a publisher's/composer's permission needs to be applied for by any producer of a sampled, or altered, cover version of a registered copyright. Alas, in contrast to a similar situation regarding EFTO (Grocer Jack), whose publisher (EMI Music) is remarkably discriminating in whom they grant cover/sample release permission to, and that only AFTER the final cover version has been approved by them as well as me (and Keith West), I have never received a permission request from Bourne Music re TOV, and therefore presume that Bourne simply grant permission on my behalf ad lib. I am responding to this subject in such detail only because it might be educational and informative to some. Best, Mark W. http://www.markwirtz.com --- "Tom K. White" wrote: > > Hey mis amigos, I was just wondering, has anyone > (particularly > Mark Wirtz) heard the new version of The Mood > Mosaic's "A Touch > Of Velvet, A Sting Of Brass" that's going about? I > came accross > it on a German compilation the other day, and had to > check it out. > It's credited to the (stupidly named) Dixi Disco, > the same guy who > mixed the compilation supposedly (although he's > credited as "Dixy" > in some places), written by J. Ferdy (one of Mark's > pseudonyms right?) > and copyright House Nation Records/Dance Street > GmbH. The weirdest > thing about it is it seems to be nothing more than a > remix using a > large sample of the original track (horns, strings, > Ladybirds, > everything). It's not a total monstrosity, but > there's no real > reason to like it either... Hope this isn't news to > Mark! I was > just wondering how much that guy had to pay Mark for > the privelege! > Ciao for now... > > Tom K > > > > -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 06:13:58 EDT From: JK Subject: Spanky And Our gang One of my top 5 albums of all time is featured in Mojo Magazine's Buried Treasure feature this month....Spanky and Our Gang - Anything You Choose b/w Without Rhyme Or Reason, and the quote is "You could call it The Harmony Pop Sgt Pepper..." this album is a true joy and apparently is coming out as part of a Spanky And Our Gang 4CD Boxset - The Complete Mercury Recordings through Universal records group ..Everything comes if you wait...even if I do have the Japanese CD release....Oh yeh... JK -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 16:56:21 -0000 From: Clark Subject: New jingles to Musica Now to Musica as "filler" material, I give a 1967 Heaven Scent jingle! Does anyone out there have a better quality or different version they can share with me? This one sounds like an Ellie Greenwich jingle! Also, from 1970, a nice laid back Mark Lindsay solo for Levi's jeans. Sorry about the quality. Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 16:35:17 -0000 From: Mark Wirtz Subject: Re: David Pomerantz Thank you Patrick Beckers and Bill George for your much appreciated update info on David Pomeranz. I was (still am) a huge fan of David's vocal and writing talents back in the 70's. Matter of fact, Jimmy Bowen and I covered one of his songs in a co-production ("If You Walked Away"). It was never released, but if you wish to hear it (it's a gem), simply write to me off-board, and I'll send you an mp3 of it. David Pomeranz became most known as the composer of several "easy listening" Barry Manilow hits, even though David's own renditions and productions were infinitely superior and more profound. I could never understand why he (and his peer harmony group Alessi, for that matter) failed to become major acts - except, in David's case, he managed to piss off so many people back then with his attitude that nobody wanted to work with him. But that is ancient history. I am thrilled that David is still around and finding acceptance of his talents. I wish him luck and can't wait to hear his new stuff! Very best, Mark Mark P. Wirtz http://www.markwirtz.com --- In spectropop@yahoogroups.com, Bill George wrote: > > Mark Wirtz was asking about the current activities of > David Pomerantz. I just saw online that he has written > the music for a new musical with book and lyrics by Kathie > Lee Gifford! It sounds like a show aimed toward children. > > I once had an LP by him which I got somewhere dirt cheap. I > only knew him from the song "Trying to Get the Feeling" by > Barry Manilow. I don't have the LP anymore, so I must not > have liked it very much. > > Bill -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 18:13:24 -0000 From: Ed Salamon Subject: Attn; Nashville S'poppers Nashville area S'poppers including Austin Roberts, Nick Archer and yours truly will meet late Sunday (10/24) afternoon for another unofficial and unsanctioned get together. We expect that Aldon Music songwriter Jack Keller will be joining us to talk about his hits "Everybody's Somebody's Fool", "Run To Him', "Venus In Blue Jeans", his work with The Monkees, etc. etc.. If you live in the area and are interested in joining us, please contact me by email. Ed Salamon -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 00:09:10 +0100 From: Phil Chapman Subject: Re: 60s recording sessions Hi and welcome, George. Working in NYC studios from '58-'70 you must have seen recording evolve from mono thru' 24-track, the most exciting and imaginative period, in my opinion. You mention Bob Crewe. To my ears, the majority of his 60s productions sound over-recorded, which, apart from making them louder than other records, also makes them rip, clatter and crash in such a great way, particularly the drums. I love the sound of "Big Girls Don't Cry" and "Walk Like A Man", and an extreme example is the Candy Girls "Runaround".. are any of these yours? Was the distortion deliberate, or a side-effect of heavy compression (or did it happen on the cut)? During the 80s/90s most studios had either SSL or Neve boards and Eastlake monitoring, but did the various studios you worked at have their own in-house set-ups? I thought stuff recorded at Mirasound sounded a little aggressive at the top end. Tommy Boyce once told me that a disgruntled engineer there poured paint-stripper into the console. I've often wondered about the background to this story:-) Phil C. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 12:38:42 -0700 (PDT) From: George S. Subject: Re: Fever authorship Steve Harvey: > ........ I always wondered why Otis Blackwell had the > tune on his LPs, but never saw his name there. Otis Blackwell did hundreds of demos at Allegro/NYC for Hal Fine music publishers, which included many songs for Presley. I read recently that he won a very lengthy lawsuit in order to finally collect his royalties and he won somewhere around a million dollars...too bad he didn't receive them when they were due...he really would have been well off. On top of that, the article indicated that the RIAA, which keeps track of all royalties due, couldn't tell who was to get what since there were no files at this point, so many writers got screwed under these conditions. All this after many gave up sole rights to their songs and had to accept half the credit. I guess Hollywood wasn't the only ones to use creative bookeeping. Regards, George S. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 20:05:30 -0000 From: Tom K. White Subject: Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash? Mark W: > I haven't a clue about this cover, but I occasionally > hear rumours about sampled cover versions, or dance > mixes, of T.O.V. Thanks for the info Mark, and the other Mark. Interesting stuff, to me anyway. Just wondering, as a pure hypothetical, how would you feel if one of your songs covered by this licencing agreement suddenly became a huge international hit either by way of sampling or another artist recording a cover? Also, just out of interest, was the original version of ATOVASOB a hit in Germany (reissued on the back of the Beat Club series perhaps?) or other parts of Europe? And do you remember anything about a German language version of "The Mighty Quinn" you produced for a guy called Dave Colman? It's on a Bear Family CD, and I was surprised to see it there... Who was this Dave Colman anyway? Tom K -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 12:40:58 -0700 (PDT) From: George S. Subject: Re: '60s recording sessions Barry: > Did you work at Bell Studios in NY? No, only Regent, Allegro, Columbia, and Mirasound...all NYC. from 58-70 after which I was with Dolby Labs till '80. Regards, George S. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 16:52:25 EDT From: Austin Roberts Subject: Re: New jingles to Musica Clark: > Now to Musica as "filler" material, I give a 1967 > Heaven Scent jingle! Hi Clark, I did a pretty big national jingle for Coty Sweet Earth around 1973. I believe Joe Renzetti (I'm pretty sure), myself and a flute, drums and keyboard. I wrote and sang it and heard it on radio and TV a lot. I don't know how to get a copy but if you can locate it and get a copy I'd owe you one. Thanks ahead of time, Austin R. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 12:31:40 -0700 (PDT) From: George S. Subject: Re: '60s recording sessions Steve Harvey: > Welcome, George, and start talking! Tell me about > Mickey Baker. I first encountered Mickey Baker at Allegro Studios in NYC. He was a spark plug for those who were around him. It was Mickey and Sylvia at first and then Kitty came along about 1-2 yrs later. I still have in the library some demos he did with me (with Kitty) and he was the guitarist in residence at my wedding, along with Sticks Evans/drums, Doles Dickens /Bass, and Jimmy Breedlove/vocals and bongos. I'll be delving into the library soon in order to preserve much of the original material on newer technologies. Regards, George S. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 15:29:22 -0400 From: Joe Nelson Subject: Re: 60s recording sessions George Schowerer: > Hello: I'm the recording engineer/mixer for many of the > 60s rock sessions ......... Actually, I just raised this question a while back, but you're probably the best person to be able to answer it... In the US in the early 60's, most recording was done on three track. By the time the session was ready for final remixing, you generally had the rhythm track on one, backing vocals and orchestra on two and the lead vocal on three. It's hard to imagine the orchestra and backing singers live although it may well be true, but it doesn't take much to record all three to separate tracks and bounce the three down to two (either by going directly to a second 3T or by remixing to wide stereo and transfering this mix back to 3T) However - much of this early material features double-tracked lead vocals, and while examples exist of this being recordfed at least in part with the vocal group (Frankie Valli typically sang with the rest of the Four Seasons, then overdubbed a second track solo), usually both voices appear together in the stereo picture. So how'd we get five out of three? Did the singers sing live with the orchestra after all, or did the lead singers double-track live into a bounce? The second vocals are usually identical for the mono and stereo remixes so I doubt this was added in the final mixdown. Joe Nelson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 15:22:46 -0700 (PDT) From: Michael Sinclair Subject: Re: A Touch Of Velvet, A Sting Of Cash? Tom K. White wrote: > Hey mis amigos, I was just wondering, has anyone (particularly > Mark Wirtz) heard the new version of The Mood Mosaic's "A Touch > Of Velvet, A Sting Of Brass" that's going about? Mark F: > Though, as far as I know, no version has ever been a chart > hit. Am I right? If so that's an amazing fact in itself. As always, Mark F. is the man that knows. No, it was never a chart hit anywhere, even though having been a sig theme on countless radio and TV show stations, even the Italian TV News... Nevertheless, I (thankfully) earned far more royalties from TOV than, let's say, Teenage Opera. Moreover, those eranings appeared unexpectedly like miracles in some of the toughest spots in my life and bailed me out when I was literally close to being "on the streets". Funny, to think that I wrote and arranged the thing as a filler (on my now fabled banjo with the pipe tremolo arm) two hours before the fist Mood Mosaic session back in 1965. In the studio, we had one run-through, Mike Ross did one of his ingenius "instant balance-mix" fader acrobatics, Ladybirds Maggie, Gloria, Marian, Barbara (Moore) puckered up, and we recorded the thing live in one take. Should all your "throw-aways" be so fortuitous! Best, Mark W http://www.markwirtz.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Tue, 19 Oct 2004 00:48:35 +0100 From: Phil Chapman Subject: Re: Linzer / Randell Mike Rashkow: > and, for the Toys, they also wrote and produced Attack, which > while a bit sloppy was interesting and unique as well as May > My Heart Be Cast Into Stone, a great song (one of Phil C's > favorites) and one that Ms. Ellie Greenwich and I produced a > decent cover of with The Other Voices on Atlantic. And what a valiant effort it was too. Touches of the Definitive Rock Chorale. Yes, the song (a partner to "Working My Way Back To You") is delightfully OTT, and, in my opinion, the Toys recording was even more scrappy than "Attack", which endears me to it no end:-) Nonetheless, at the height of the UK beat boom, I was intrigued to see the Toys version high in the U.S. charts. Who exactly were the 'Other Voices', Mike? Did you and Ellie produce their other 45 on Atlantic? You never did tell me what comprised the 'whiplash' effect. I've played it to musica for others to take a guess. Oh, and I've never quite pinpointed the classical lift, any clues? Phil C. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Mon, 18 Oct 2004 22:02:18 -0000 From: Freya Subject: Phil Spector reverb Presumably Phil Spector used some kind of acoustical space for reverb, does anyone know anything about what kind of space he used and its dimensions etc? Or anything else about this or other production techniques he used? love Freya -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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