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Spectropop - Digest Number 1674



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 21 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Critters Second LP
           From: Various 
      2. The Virginia Wolves: Rose Peddles ...
           From: Phil X Milstein 
      3. Re: Critters Second LP
           From: C. Ponti 
      4. Re: Tony May
           From: Mike Rashkow 
      5. The Angels
           From: Barry 
      6. Herb Alpert's vocals
           From: Phil X Milstein 
      7. Re:  Arrangers - Carole King
           From: Michael Sinclair 
      8. Re: Sylvan
           From: Mark Maldwyn 
      9. Re: Beg, Borrow & Steal
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     10. Bert Weedon & "Apache"
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     11. Re: Pop music as fine art.
           From: Austin Roberts 
     12. Re: Arrangers - Carole King
           From: James Botticelli 
     13. Re: Beg, Borrow & Steal
           From: Dave Monroe 
     14. Re: Nothing takes the place... on CD
           From: Shawn Nagy 
     15. Re: Chilling Lyrics
           From: Steve Harvey 
     16. Re: French EP's
           From: Dave Monroe 
     17. Terry Phillips / Virginia Wolves
           From: Austin Roberts 
     18. Re: The Angels
           From: Jeff Lemlich 
     19. I'm back, baby!
           From: Jack Madani 
     20. Re: Herb Alpert's vocals
           From: Mike Rashkow 
     21. Re: Good Vibes changes
           From: Robert 


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Message: 1 Date: Mon, 4 Oct 2004 21:31:56 +0100 From: Various Subject: Re: Critters Second LP James Botticelli wrote: > Enoch Light presents The Critters on Project 3...Just reissued > on LP format. AND as I was listening to the Bobby Vee double CD > I heard him do "Let's Call It A Day Girl." Great song lyrically > and melodically. I remember it being discussed here a while back. > Who did the hit version?? Thanks in advance.. POW 101 - The Razor's Edge Let's Call It A Day Girl/Avril (April) both sides written by Irwin Levine and Neil Sheppard. Max Weiner: James, The Razor's Edge had a hit version of this song Davie Gordon: The Razor's Edge (Pow! 101) 06/66 -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Mon, 04 Oct 2004 14:56:06 -0400 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: The Virginia Wolves: Rose Peddles ... Not long ago Austin Roberts mentioned an early group of his named The Virginia Wolves, who cut a single for ABC in 1967, which I believe was his first-ever release. The A-side was an update of a McHugh-Gaskill non-standard titled "I Can't Believe That You're In Love With Me"; the flip an A.R. original (published under his birth name of George Robertson) titled "Rose Peddles Everywhere She Goes." Both were produced by Terry Philips, who besides his work with Austin Roberts is also the one degree of separation bridging the careers of Phil Spector and Lou Reed. Enjoy "Rose Peddles" now at musica. When I asked Austin for his OK to post the track, he replied, "Please just tell folks it was cut in 1967, when I had very little if any experience with the business." Duly noted, Austin, but perhaps if we all click our heels together or something you can conjure up a few more memories of the group, session and/or release of The Virginia Wolves 45. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Mon, 04 Oct 2004 18:44:34 -0000 From: C. Ponti Subject: Re: Critters Second LP James Botticelli wrote: > Enoch Light presents The Critters on Project 3...Just reissued > on LP format. Wasn't The Critters' album called Touch And Go? I remember the title song..."touch 'n go, the girl don't show me, any kind of love at all"... C. Ponti -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Mon, 4 Oct 2004 11:45:01 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Tony May Correction to my previous re: Tony May His wife's name was Harriett (sp?) not Henrietta. And for the sake of completeness, Tony's full name is Ross Anthony May; initials to conjur with:-) Di la, Raskvovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Mon, 4 Oct 2004 09:57:53 -0500 From: Barry Subject: The Angels Does anybody know an amazingly hot single by The Angels, "You're The Cause Of It" on RCA? When I found a copy of this obscure single, I was floored. Who said Girl Groups weren't still recording forward-thinking, hot stuff after the British Invasion? Barry in Minneapolis -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Mon, 04 Oct 2004 16:02:59 -0400 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Herb Alpert's vocals Does anyone know of the existence of a listing of Herb Alpert's vocals on record? If not, is there anyone who might be willing to help me start compiling one? The singing of his that I've heard is among the most sublime in the entire canon of pop, and, from what I've heard of his trumpet playing, I'm mystified as to how he could've chosen the latter on which to focus his career. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Fri, 1 Oct 2004 21:02:18 -0700 (PDT) From: Michael Sinclair Subject: Re: Arrangers - Carole King Robert Pingel wrote: > As a meaningless mental exercise I decided to make > a top 10 list of the best musical arrangers from the > 60's........ If Carole King is respectfully mentioned, then why the the dickens was Jimmy Webb's name omitted??? Mark Wirtz http://www.markwirtz.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Mon, 04 Oct 2004 19:27:51 -0000 From: Mark Maldwyn Subject: Re: Sylvan Thanks for the Sylvan information. I now know she also co-wrote such songs as It's Not Unusual and is a talented songwriter and photographer. Mark M -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Mon, 04 Oct 2004 16:07:10 -0400 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: Beg, Borrow & Steal Dave The Rave wrote: > However, there is a killer version of "Beg, Borrow & Steal" that > Cameo released prior to the Ohio Express release on Cameo. The > version by the Demotrons, Cameo 456, is great! I may have played > this on my XM show, not sure, if so it may still be audio archived > at www.davetherave.com. Any chance you could play this one to musica? I imagine there's many of us who'd love to hear it! Yeah, --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Mon, 04 Oct 2004 15:37:51 -0400 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Bert Weedon & "Apache" I recently acquired a dub of Bert Weedon playing "Apache." I am aware that he debuted this song, but I wonder if he mightn't've also rerecorded it at some point later in his career. All versions of "Apache" that I've heard are pretty similar to one another, hence I'd assumed they'd followed Weedon's pretty closely, but the arrangement on this one is unique enough to cause me to wonder if he hadn't tried to "reinvent" it (somewhat, as it's not THAT different) somewhere down the road. Any Weedonophiles who could help me out on this matter? Thanks, --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Mon, 4 Oct 2004 15:30:12 EDT From: Austin Roberts Subject: Re: Pop music as fine art. > Previously: > Geez, get real, folks -- popular music is no more "(fine) art" > than even the most skilfully painted graffiti is. It is not rocket > science, or a religion, or a human condition altering phenomenon. > It may even be a form of psychic medication, but it is not medicine! > It's entertainment. That's all. And that's a lot! Putting it as simply as possible: God gives us each a gift or, with some, more than one. We are to learn to use that gift and learn to get it to the point of it being a Craft. Michaelangelo, Beethoven, Robert Frost (3 of the more familiar gifted people) created art. Many musicians, modern day as well, create their form of art that is enjoyed by many. Were it not a gift first, then hard work to develop it, perhaps it could be called something else. I feel that there are people in their fields today that are as gifted and as hard working with their gift as to be called artists and therefore creators of ART. Some of these Artists are, at least in my mind, as gifted in what they do as the great composers, lyricists, actors, painters etc. of the past. One man's opinion. AR -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Mon, 4 Oct 2004 17:34:35 -0400 From: James Botticelli Subject: Re: Arrangers - Carole King Mark Wirtz: > If Carole King is respectfully mentioned, then why the dickens > was Jimmy Webb's name omitted??? I found a copy of Neil Sedaka's 1982 autobio at a thrift shop in Connecticut this past summer...He and Carole were quite an item once upon a time. I guess 'Oh Carol' comes from that one......Pretty good story BTW. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Mon, 4 Oct 2004 14:22:04 -0700 (PDT) From: Dave Monroe Subject: Re: Beg, Borrow & Steal > Well, I own the Attack 45 as well as the Cameo- > Parkway 45..I A/B'd them and there is no difference > between the tracks. Possibly some minor aural > tweaking, but the tracks are identical. Well, I've recalled precisely what I believe the difference to be, but it's one that emerges on a CD comp (Bubblegum Classics Vol. 2, maybe? My CD collection is currently in storage). There's a little bass fillip at the end of those I-IV-V-IV progressions during the verses on what's credited as the Rare Breed version (on, at leats, that comp) that's either simply not so pronounced, or that I simply still fail to notice, on the Ohio Express 45. This I imagine is an artifact of the CD mastering, then, if it's not simply a figment of my imagination entirely. So tahnks for performing the taste test, AND for further info ... -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Mon, 04 Oct 2004 22:08:19 -0000 From: Shawn Nagy Subject: Re: Nothing takes the place... on CD The UK label "Westside" released Toussaint's LP, Singles & unreleased tracks on "The Ronn recordings" CD a few years back. I got my copy through Midnight Records (NY) online. Off masters, sounds great. --------------------------------------------------------------- Admin Note: Gentle reminder. Will all members PLEASE sign their posts. Thanks. S'pop --------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Mon, 4 Oct 2004 15:04:17 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: Chilling Lyrics There was a good story in Mojo last year where either Holland or Dozier talked about a crush they had on this little Italian girl back in grade school. Years later they saw this woman walking down the sidewalk dragging along four or five kids and it was Bernadette! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Mon, 4 Oct 2004 14:16:54 -0700 (PDT) From: Dave Monroe Subject: Re: French EP's Tom: > I meant to say it wasn't the track on the EP that > was marked out to be the hit, if you know what I > mean. It wasn't the "plug side". Two track singles > were often issued in France for jukebox and other > promotional use, but usually these came without > picture sleeves. I'm under the impression that perhaps the two-track 45 was more the province of certain labels as well. I've no end of, say, picture-sleeved Disques Vogue 4-track EPs, but my AZ stuff, on the other hand, consists, off the top of my head, largely of two-track 45s. And some of those did come with picture sleeves, whether or not those sleeves made it all the way to me (Uta's "Baudelaire" comes to mind). This seems true of some of the other smaller-label stuff I have, but, in general, I think your generalization stands ... FrankM: > There's a current craze within mod and EZy DJ's for > foreign cover versions of sixties UK and US dance > stuff. Our local university radio station > (www.subcity.org) has a French DJ, Marjore, who in > the middle of a bunch of French hip Hop will "drop", > as they say, an old sixties YeYe track. I've actually often worked my way back from a Francophone cover to the English-language original, not always an easy task as, again, French covers aren't always straight translations. David Alexandre Winter's "Qu'est-ce que j'ai dansť!" (Archie Bell & The Drells' "I Can't Stop Dancing") was one thing, but Gil Now's "Dis-Le Moi" (Dean Parrish's "Skate") ... Although he sings in English, a recent favorite of mine in this regard is Vigon, who I've taken to describing as The Tom Jones of Morocco. I've sbeen spinning his covers of Bob & Earl's "Baby, Your Time is My Time" and Eddie Purrell's "The Spoiler," but he also does a decent "Harlem Shuffle" ... > The Scopitones site is featuring Richard Anthony, > Claude Francois and Johnny Halliday at: > http://scopitones.com/scopitone_of_the_day_archive.html The first couple of French ones in particular are well worth looking into ... -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Mon, 4 Oct 2004 19:53:11 EDT From: Austin Roberts Subject: Terry Phillips / Virginia Wolves Phil Milstein: > Enjoy "Rose Peddles" now at musica. When I asked Austin for his OK to > post the track, he replied, "Please just tell folks it was cut in 1967, > when I had very little if any experience with the business." Duly noted, > Austin, but perhaps if we all click our heels together or something you > can conjure up a few more memories of the group, session and/or release > of The Virginia Wolves 45. Phil, I remember Terry Phillips wanting to cut I Can't Believe in the direction of the Happenings, who were hot at that time; although I don't think it's all that much like them. He liked Rose Peddles as a bubblegum B side in case radio stations liked it better. I don't remember the actual session. Terry had taken an interest in me as a writer\singer around 1965, I think, which gave me some confidence that I needed as we all do. I had been singing Blue Eyed Soul with a buddy of mine named Johnny Reese from Hampton, Va., so I called us the Virginia Wolves and dragged him into the studio in NYC screaming. Not really, but he'd had a lot less experience with recording than me, and I'd just gotten started. The funny aside to this, which I may have mentioned before, is, that I was at Parris Island (Marine Boot Camp; oh boy) at the time of the record's release (1967), and the Drill Instructors went through our mail. They called me out in front of the Platoon and made me read the Billboard revue and then made me eat it. The Marines are kind of serious. What a great way to have your first single release. An older Ex Marine, AR -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Tue, 05 Oct 2004 00:09:25 -0000 From: Jeff Lemlich Subject: Re: The Angels Barry: > Does anybody know an amazingly hot single by The Angels, > "You're The Cause Of It" on RCA? When I found a copy of > this obscure single, I was floored. Barry, was this song written by Trade Martin? If so, I have a version by the Lovables on Toot (which I believe may have been Martin's label). Jeff Lemlich http://www.limestonerecords.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Mon, 04 Oct 2004 19:54:53 -0400 From: Jack Madani Subject: I'm back, baby! So my school installed the latest version of the email server, and badda bing badda boom, all of a sudden I can get spectropop digests again! As Strong Bad would say, Holy Crap! As Homestar would say, Seriously! This is great, I'm so glad to be back amongst the muscially likeminded. Recent musical purchases: Rhino Handmade's "Come To The Sunshine: Soft Pop Nuggets from the WEA Vaults" The Addrisi Brothers' "Never My Love: The Lost Album Sessions" Michele Lee's "Taste of the Fantastic/L. David Sloane & Other Hits" twofer. So: was L. David Sloane originally a tune that was meant for Doris Day? It sure sounds like it could've been a perfect match for Terry Melcher's Mom. Jack -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Mon, 4 Oct 2004 21:20:10 EDT From: Mike Rashkow Subject: Re: Herb Alpert's vocals Phil Milstein: > Does anyone know of the existence of a listing of Herb Alpert's vocals > on record? If not, is there anyone who might be willing to help me start > compiling one? The singing of his that I've heard is among the most > sublime in the entire canon of pop, and, from what I've heard of his > trumpet playing, I'm mystified as to how he could've chosen the latter > on which to focus his career. Someone give Milstein a saliva test. Rashkovsky -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Tue, 05 Oct 2004 05:13:30 -0000 From: Robert Subject: Re: Good Vibes changes Actually, if you listen to the Good Vibrations early version and outtakes on the Smiley Smile CD, you'll see that the lyrics used on the new SMiLE are actually the original lyrics. "She's already workin' on my brain........" Rob -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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