The Spectropop Group Archives presented by Friends of Spectropop

[Prev by Date] [Next by Date] [Index] [Search]

Spectropop - Digest Number 1644



________________________________________________________________________
      
               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
________________________________________________________________________


There are 17 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Mickey and Sylvia question
           From: Roy Clough 
      2. Lenny Stogel, R.I.P.
           From: Austin Roberts 
      3. John Harrison & The Hustlers
           From: Greg Matecko 
      4. Weird Paris Sisters CD on Curb
           From: Jeffery Kennedy 
      5. Re: This year Christmas comes earlier
           From: Davie Gordon 
      6. Re: The Frank Guida Sound
           From: Austin Roberts 
      7. Various
           From: Clark Besch 
      8. Re: The Fleetwoods' later recordings
           From: Gary Myers 
      9. Re: Florida Rock in the sixties - Savage Lost
           From: Gary Myers 
     10. Re: Gillian Hills and Rod and Carolyn
           From: Alun Hill 
     11. Re: Florida Rock in the sixties - Savage Lost
           From: Max Weiner 
     12. Re: Mickey Mouse copyright laws
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     13. Re: Mickey and Sylvia question
           From: Joe Nelson 
     14. Neither pop nor 60's by ANY stretch of the imagination...
           From: Joe Nelson 
     15. Re: Weird Paris Sisters CD on Curb
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     16. Re: This year Christmas comes earlier
           From: Frank Jastfelder 
     17. Hey Bo Diddley Fans!
           From: S'pop Team 


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
Message: 1 Date: Sun, 12 Sep 2004 14:18:00 -0000 From: Roy Clough Subject: Mickey and Sylvia question Can someone settle a debate for me? Who actually played the guitar riff on "Love Is Strange" by Mickey & Sylvia? I say it was indeed Micky Baker but some say it was in fact Sylvia. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 20:30:42 EDT From: Austin Roberts Subject: Lenny Stogel, R.I.P. Hey Artie, You mentioned Lenny Stogel. He was my first manager, in 1966. I went in the Marines right after signing with him. He had a lot of plans for me and he and his wife Myrna were great to me, even though I hadn't even recorded anything yet or scratched the surface of a hit as a writer. I was shocked and very sad when Lenny died in that American Airlines Chicago crash quite a few years ago. He was definitely one of the Good Guys! Austin Roberts -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 21:53:37 -0400 (EDT) From: Greg Matecko Subject: John Harrison & The Hustlers Hey kids! I found a song on a mix tape called "You Don't Want That" by John Harrison & The Hustlers that just jangles me to death! Digging around the WWW, I managed to score a copy. It seems that on the few places that it showed up online, people were mentioning its flip. "Don't Ask Why." Anyone know anything about these guys? I also notice that the disc is produced by George Goodman - is this the same George Goodman, along with the Headliners, that did "Let Me Love You"? Greg Matecko -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 20:58:01 -0000 From: Jeffery Kennedy Subject: Weird Paris Sisters CD on Curb Has anyone else heard this CD: "The Best of the Paris Sisters" on Curb Records? You can see a track listing on Amazon.com. I'm guessing that most of the tracks are previously unreleased solo material Priscilla recorded in the '60s with Mike Curb. There are no notes explaining when the tracks were recorded. Priscilla wrote several of the songs. It's pretty easy to guess which ones by the titles. A couple of the tracks sound a bit rough and unfinished. I think all of them are mono. Does anyone have any details regarding the background of these tracks? People on the Net seem to be miffed that this isn't a proper Paris Sisters hit compilation, but I'm like, unreleased Priscilla material? Yahoo! Jeffery -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 16:36:04 -0000 From: Davie Gordon Subject: Re: This year Christmas comes earlier Artie Wayne wrote: > Santa Frank...How ya' doin'? I've been a good little boy, and I'd > love to be in your Christmas compilation album with a song I wrote > with George Clinton, Jr., "Little Christmas Tree" for Michael > Jackson. It was in the legendary Motown Christmas album which was > released in 1973. If this isn't possible, I'll settle for a brand > new Cadillac Escalade. Hi Artie, good to see you back - I've been wondering how you were. Is that the George Clinton of Parliament or the other one? Hope Santa brings you a Cadillac (wasn't that a song?) Davie -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 19:27:46 EDT From: Austin Roberts Subject: Re: The Frank Guida Sound Jeff Lemlich: > Guida masterminded a very cool promotional record for the shop in > 1969. "Frankie's Got It!" by the Steve Peele Five is a pretty good > psychedelic novelty that can be heard on the "Aliens, Psychos, & > Wild Things" compilation of Tidewater-area bands. > > Jeff Lemlich & His Perpetual Hurricane Preparations > http://www.limestonerecords.com Man, How do you come up with all this info. I have that CD too, but how did you even know about it or Guida's stores etc etc? Did you ever live in the Va. Beach, Norfolk area? Austin (very impressed) Roberts -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 06:03:02 -0000 From: Clark Besch Subject: Various With all the copyright comments on "Lion Sleeps Tonight", I saw a great show on the History Channel (repeats Thusday night at 9 eastern time) called the "War of 1812". Called the forgotten war, it certainly is a fantastic story. One musical aspect of it was new to me. Francis Scott Key wrote the "Star Spangled Banner" during the war (actually Sept 14--the day I'm writing this!-- in 1814) in Baltimore. In 1931, it became the U.S.' national anthem. Amazing thing was that he wrote it first, as a poem titled "The Defense of Fort McHenry". When it spread throughout U.S. newspapers, it was oddly enough put to the music of an old British drinking song, "To Anacreon in Heaven"! Am wondering if Mick Patrick and all his friends will have law suits flying to us in the U.S. soon???? ;) On that same British invasion topic.....well, not the SAME British invasion, but.......how many people today in the U.S. hear "She Loves You" and, like me, get frustrated by the fact that it is SO much better than "I Want to Hold Your Hand", yet the latter got so much more respect when the both hit in early 64 and it still does today? Of course, you U.K. people don't think of it that way, since both had their own separate release periods there. In fact, "She Loves You" charted 31 weeks there and "Hand" only 21, both reaching #1 in both countries. "She Loves You" was my choice in January, 1964 and still is today by a wide margin! Even "I'll Get You" deserves much more praise than it ever gets here. Altho revisionism in the above situation would be welcomed by me, a couple of things bug me about today's memories of the 60's. One is how EVERY top 40 station was all over "Michelle" by the Beatles (actually just Paul, of course) in late 1965, yet today it is "Yesterday" from the same period that gets all the praise. Yes, "Yesterday" was recorded by a gazillion number of artists, but in 1965/early 66, it was "Michelle" that outdrew the great "Yesterday" for listeners. It ranked #1 as an Lp cut on KCBQ San Diego. I still have my list of WLS' Art Roberts presentation of his Top 3 most requested show when he gave the top requested songs for the year on WLS--#1 was "Michelle" for the whole year as voted Dec 31, 1965. Topping it off was "Michelle" getting the Grammy for Song of the Year! You never hear it now, but it was HUGE in the U.S. in December 65/January 66 on radio and in the hearts of listeners. Another one is "Cherish" by the Association. I don't know how many stations listed it as #1 for 66, but at least in the midwest, it was most all of em, it seemed. In Chicago, the Association was so big that a late 1968 "All time requested" chart by WCFL not only put "Cherish" as #1, but almost every 45 by the group was in the top 100! Even the classic "No Fair at All" made it!! The Association were it in Chicago, which must have helped my Cryan Shames buddies, as they often got compared to them. Yet, today, "Cherish" garners no special respect and we never hear the long ending either. Anyway, here are 2 cases where, to me, revisionism is alive and well and not welcomed! Clark -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 21:40:59 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: Re: The Fleetwoods' later recordings Me, earlier: > So apparently that means that the Fleetwoods released ("Before And > After") before Chad & Jeremy did? Martin Jensen: > Yes, according to the liner notes of the Fleetwoods' EMI collection, > Chad & Jerey cut a competing version after the Fleetwoods release and > had the hit. Interesting. And, according to my info, it was written by Van McCoy. gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 21:37:33 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: Re: Florida Rock in the sixties - Savage Lost Mick Patrick: > ... there's the excellent book "Savage Lost - Florida Garage Bands > - The '60s And Beyond", written by S'pop's very own Jeff Lemlich ... It even includes a very tiny contribution from another S'popper - yours truly. :-) gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 12:56:33 -0000 From: Alun Hill Subject: Re: Gillian Hills and Rod and Carolyn Mick Patrick wrote: > To the best of my knowledge, "Tomorrow Is Another Day" (no, > not the Doris Troy/Vernons Girls/Helen Shapiro song, but a > twinkling number the lovely Gillian wrote herself) was > Gillian's only British 45. Although she is English, I think > all of her other releases are sung in French. While nice, > they are no match for this gorgeous track. What a shame RPM > didn't also include the A-side on their "Folk Rock and > Faithfull" CD, because it's even better than the flip. Ne'er > mind, it's now playing @ musica. It's a bit crackly, but fab: > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ > > Details are: Gillian Hills "Look At Them" (UK Disques Vogue, > VRS 7005, 1965) Written by Gillian Hills. Orchestra arranged > and conducted by Bob Leaper. Prepare to melt. Hello Mick, You made my day---thanks for the Gillian Hills post to musica---been keen to hear that for ages---and well worth the wait! I am trying to compile a discog of Britgirl folkpop from 63-66. Would you know by chance anyone who has a lot of info on such a subject? (Dream Babes 5: I will wear it out one day). I am especially keen to find info on Rod & Carolyn, who have appeared in a few comps but sadly without any info. Much appreciated for your help! alun hill -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 10:41:27 -0700 (PDT) From: Max Weiner Subject: Re: Florida Rock in the sixties - Savage Lost Me: > ... is there any history available about Florida's rock scene > in the sixties? Any books or articles? Mick Patrick: > Well, for starters there's the excellent book "Savage Lost: > Florida Garage Bands - The '60s And Beyond", written by S'pop's > very own Jeff Lemlich ... I imagine you'll find more info at > Jeff's website, that's if he's survived the hurricane: > http://www.limestonerecords.com/ Thanks for the input! And if Jeff happens to live here in Miami, you don't have to worry, IVAN is headed for the panhandle. But... they say another one's brewin. Here we go again! max -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 15:45:07 -0400 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: Mickey Mouse copyright laws Clark Besch wrote: > Francis Scott Key wrote the "Star Spangled Banner" during the > war (actually Sept 14--the day I'm writing this!-- in 1814) in Meaning today is its 200th anniversary, on the nose. Wish I liked the song more than I do! I've always sided with Ray Charles in his support of making "America" the national anthem, on the grounds that a) a celebration of our (once) beautiful landscape seems far more appropriate than a celebration of a tattered flag (especially when you consider for how long the country that tattered it has been our beloved ally), and b) it's far more singable. > Baltimore. In 1931, it became the U.S.' national anthem. Amazing > thing was that he wrote it first, as a poem titled "The Defense of > Fort McHenry". When it spread throughout U.S. newspapers, it was > oddly enough put to the music of an old British drinking song, "To > Anacreon in Heaven"! Turning that case on its ear, our "Of Thee I Sing" is the British national anthem but with new words. Disregarding all other factors, I believe that copyright laws were much different then, in fact quite possibly not even written yet. And, when it comes to copyright, there will from now on always be a pre-Mickey Mouse and post-Mickey Mouse distinction, of measures of degree of leniency. I think that after the next round of duration extension, copyrights will be good for perpetuity plus the lifetime of the author. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 15:36:42 -0400 From: Joe Nelson Subject: Re: Mickey and Sylvia question Roy Clough: > Can someone settle a debate for me? Who actually played the guitar > riff on "Love Is Strange" by Mickey & Sylvia? I say it was indeed > Micky Baker but some say it was in fact Sylvia. Both of them played guitar on the record, but the bulk of the leads were Mickey. I believe the signature lick is both guitars in harmony. But what I've been trying to figure out is: does Clough rhyme with plough, rough, through, bough, or whatever? Joe Nelson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 15:40:27 -0400 From: Joe Nelson Subject: Neither pop nor 60's by ANY stretch of the imagination... Clark Besch: > One musical aspect of it was new to me. Francis Scott Key wrote > the "Star Spangled Banner" during the war (actually Sept 14--the > day I'm writing this!-- in 1814) in Baltimore. In 1931, it became > the U.S.' national anthem. Amazing thing was that he wrote it > first, as a poem titled "The Defense of Fort McHenry". When it > spread throughout U.S. newspapers, it was oddly enough put to the > music of an old British drinking song, "To Anacreon in Heaven"! I don't even want to know what this sounded like in the mouths of a tavern full of drunks. It's hard enough to sing when you're sober! Joe Nelson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 16:34:10 -0400 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: Weird Paris Sisters CD on Curb Jeffery Kennedy wrote: > Has anyone else heard this CD: "The Best of the Paris Sisters" on > Curb Records? You can see a track listing on Amazon.com. > Does anyone have any details regarding the background of these tracks? I don't have the CD, but judging from the track listing it is just their Sidewalk LP, "Golden Hits Of The Paris Sisters," repackaged with one of their Mercury sides, "Always Waitin'," added. (Confusing matters a bit is the fact that, at least as it's listed at Amazon, the title of "Won't You Help Me" has been transposed to "You Won't ...") Great stuff no matter how you slice it, although the CD cover art is hardly a match for that of the original LP! For more information and a scan of the LP cover (alas, in miniature), see J.D. Doyle's Paris Sisters discography, at http://www.geocities.com/spectropop/paris/sistersdiscog.html . The discography is in turn a a companion to a three-part illustrated biography, which begins at http://www.geocities.com/spectropop/paris/sistersstory.html . Yeah, --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 23:57:53 +0200 From: Frank Jastfelder Subject: Re: This year Christmas comes earlier I want to say thank you for your kind support. It's good to have all you experts around. I'll let you know when the compilation is out. Hope you like the tracklist. Frank J. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Tue, 14 Sep 2004 23:26:12 +0100 From: S'pop Team Subject: Hey Bo Diddley Fans! Forwarded from the S'pop Public Bulletin Board: Hey BO DIDDLEY fans, An exclusive interview recorded with BO DIDDLEY in London, England in August 2004 is due to be broadcast as part of a one-hour BO DIDDLEY special on the Paul Jones rhythm & blues show on British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) Radio 2 on Thursday September 16th 2004 commencing at 8.00pm BST. The Paul Jones show is available on-line to listeners around the world via the BBC Radio Player's "Listen Live" and "Listen Again" functions located at http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio2/shows/jones David Blakey, Webmaster, BO DIDDLEY-The Originator http://members.tripod.com/~Originator_2/index.html A Celebration of his unique contribution to Popular Music. 1954-55 to 2004-05 - Celebrating 50 Years of The Bo Diddley Beat! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop! End

Click here to go to The Spectropop Group
Spectropop text contents copyright 2002 Spectropop unless stated otherwise. All rights in and to the contents of these documents, including each element embodied therein, is subject to copyright protection under international copyright law. Any use, reuse, reproduction and/or adaptation without written permission of the owners is a violation of copyright law and is strictly prohibited. All rights reserved.