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Spectropop - Digest Number 1621



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Smile and Smiley Smile
           From: MJ 
      2. Re: Brian Wilson on Larry King tonight ... for real
           From: Mike McKay 
      3. Re: Brian Wilson as lone genius
           From: Mike McKay 
      4. Re: New "Smile" CD
           From: Susan 
      5. Magazines; The Truths, "Pending"; Jimmy Ford; Dan Fogelberg
           From: Country Paul 
      6. Re: Benny "Coffee" McCain / Robert West
           From: Davie Gordon 
      7. The University of Spectropop
           From: Steve Harvey 
      8. Re: Benny "Coffee" McCain
           From: Margaret G. Still 
      9. Re: A Glimpse of Smile
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     10. Re: Valerie Simpson demo @ musica
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 
     11. Re: A Glimpse of Smile
           From: Mike McKay 
     12. Re: Al Kooper's Landlord
           From: Tony Leong 
     13. "98.6" and Keith
           From: C. Ponti 
     14. Goffin and King's Honey and Wine
           From: Don H. 
     15. Australian versions
           From: Lyn Nuttall 
     16. Re: Dickie Lee
           From: Joe Nelson 
     17. Tom Dowd
           From: Al Kooper 
     18. Re: Paul (Stefan) & the Pack
           From: Bob Rashkow 
     19. Re: Dickie Lee, The Robbs
           From: Bob Rashkow 
     20. Early Ashford & Simpson Songs / Smokey Joe's / Tina & the Mustangs
           From: Mick Patrick 
     21. Re: Diamond Masters
           From: Michael Ggodin 
     22. Re: Benny "Coffee" McCain / Robert Ward
           From: John Berg 
     23. Re: Patty Duke to get her star
           From: Karen Andrew 
     24. Re: Goldmine
           From: Karen Andrew 
     25. Looking For Jaynetts
           From: Billy G. Spradlin 


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Message: 1 Date: Wed, 25 Aug 2004 16:37:32 -0400 From: MJ Subject: Re: Smile and Smiley Smile > ...but does anyone else find Smiley Smile an interesting listen, > ... albeit somewhat frustrating? Had SMILE not been announced and hyped up and then later bootleged, everyone might have a very different opinion of this album. It is a great album all on its own when you don't hold it up to some vision of SMILE. It was strange to hear Rod & The Faces do a rough run though of "Gettin' Hungry" on the enw FACES Box from RHINO. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Wed, 25 Aug 2004 23:20:30 EDT From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: Brian Wilson on Larry King tonight ... for real As Bob Lind once said, I'm "running desperately behind" and trying to catch up. Clark wrote: > What was really bad was Larry. "you were a......Beach Boy? Explain > what that is?" That's not what he said, but close."That must have > been a thrill to work with Paul McCartney!" That he DID say. Maybe > it was a thrill for Paul? He seemed to have no clue as to what the > Beach Boys were about at all. Does anyone clue him in on his guests > he doesn't know of? "did you ever meet the Rat Pack?" No he didn't > say this, but I thought he would. "You say you hear voices 'I'm > Gonna Kill You'? Does this have something to do with your song 'Dead > Man's Curve'?" Naw he didn't say this, but he almost did. Brian had > nothing to do with it, but between Larry and Brian's wife, I am > depressed...... I could have told you to expect this, Clark. Larry King brags about the fact that he never prepares for interviews, and it shows. He's a Rat Pack kind of guy at heart, and it's amazing he knows who Brian Wilson is. I didn't see the show but have read the transcript, and it came out just as I expected. You missed the one thing Larry DID say: "When Glen Campbell replaced you, did they call the band 'Glen Campbell and The Beach Boys'?" Larry obviously had no clue that at this juncture, Campbell was virtually unknown to the public at large. In my mind, Larry King is the perfect example of the theory that, once you make it to a certain level, your actual performance is completely irrelevant. His Paul McCartney interview a while back was similar bogus. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2004 00:28:40 EDT From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: Brian Wilson as lone genius FWIW, in the book "Wouldn't It Be Nice" devoted to all things "Pet Sounds," Tony Asher paints a much more collaborative picture than this. Surely Brian came up with the original "feels"; however, Tony's input was not restricted strictly to lyrics, but was welcomed on melodic and chord changes as well. No one could rationally dispute the magnitude of Brian's accomplishments. I think what rankles some is that the single- minded focus on him makes out all other ingredients that came together to form what we know as "The Beach Boys" irrelevant to those who don't know better. First, no one could possibly say that the vocals on Brian's solo albums wouldn't have been better if The Beach Boys (rather than Brian, Brian and Andy Paley) had performed them. True group vocals, by their very nature, will always outshine multiple overdubs of the same voice. Secondly, would you really rather Brian had sung "God Only Knows" than Carl? Would "Feel Flows" and "Long Promised Road" have been similarly better? And finally, there are many Beach Boys tracks written and recorded with zero (or marginal) input from Brian that are very good indeed. Pointing these things out does absolutely nothing to diminish Brian Wilson's genius. But failing to do so (explicitly or implicitly by loudly proclaiming "Brian Wilson WAS The Beach Boys") does a disservice. Mike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2004 00:58:06 EDT From: Susan Subject: Re: New "Smile" CD David writes: > I've heard the finished record, and I have a feeling that even the > biggest nay Sayers on this list will be changing their tune once > they listen.... I haven't heard the finished record, but i've seen live performances of this music, and I agree with David. It will be darned near impossible to hear this and not be blown away, regardless of what you think going into it. Susan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2004 01:36:20 -0400 From: Country Paul Subject: Magazines; The Truths, "Pending"; Jimmy Ford; Dan Fogelberg Ed Salamon: > IMHO, you haven't missed anything. I have subscribed to Goldmine > since the '70s, and Discoveries since it began, and hung in hoping > things would get better, but when my current subs run out, I'm gone. > They must believe that they can attract a younger (and larger) > audience by writing about more recent music, which -- regardless > of its merits -- is just not as collected. > > In recent years, I have made constructive suggestions, and offered > to write articles about projects that I've been involved in, but > current editorial seems biased against the types of music we discuss > in this forum. In my business (radio), I've seen this many times: the > attempt to be bigger and younger with the resultant loss of the core > audience and subsequent implosion. Well said, Ed; you've crystalized my feelings about them - and about contemporary radio as well. (Darn....) And thanks to everyone else who replied to my query. I'm curious if any information exists about a group called The Truths, who had one very minor hit (maybe only some airplay) called "Pending" back in 1965 on Circle 953, dist. by London. It sounds like a trio, probably American, with a double lead vocal and a lot of Byrds influence. Anyone know anything about them? Davie Gordon, re: Jimmy Ford: > RCS lists another Jimmy Ford, but since the "other" one, on Esther, > has the same publisher as the Stylo single I think we can assume > they're one and the same: > http://rcs.law.emory.edu/rcs/artists/f/ford7500.htm I missed this extra release - thank you! There's a sound sample of the uptempo side of "Be Mine Forever," but not the song in question. (Darn again....) Eddy wrote: > With the recent postings on Dan Fogelberg, I thought I'd let you > know that he has cancelled his fall tour due to advanced prostate > cancer. Very sad to hear. I wish him health and a miraculous recovery. Fogelberg did some excellent music, and creative challenging stuff especially before all the hits, which we were proud to play on WHCN. A highlight of that time period was being in the second row and seeing him open for The Eagles (when they were new and fresh) and then join them onstage for a few songs at the end of a long concert. RIP Tony Mottola. Country Paul (eternally six days behind) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2004 18:28:45 -0000 From: Davie Gordon Subject: Re: Benny "Coffee" McCain / Robert West John Berg wrote: > I don't know anything about Benny Gordon, but that raises another > question: Does any Spectropoper know anything about Benny "Coffee" > McCain? He was another soul vocalist who sang on "She's My Heart's > Desire" by Robert Ward and the Ohio Untouchables (Lupine L-109, a > Detroit based label -- though Robert and the OUs were Dayton-based.) > I have asked Robert and he has no recollection of who Benny McCain > was (and since his stroke two years ago Robert probably remembers > even less from the '60s!) He's a total mystery, to me anyway. For info. on Robert West's Lupine and other labels have a look at the "Robert West Story" at http://www.soulfuldetroit.com Davie -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2004 18:13:26 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: The University of Spectropop Previously: > My friend Scott McKenzie is well and still interested in music. There > is no evidence that The Mamas and The Papas ever cut "San Francisco." And it is for information like this that we come and kneel at our keyboards, before the altar of Spectropop. Thanks for setting the record right. I was merely relaying information I'd read, but your source is obviously the closest outside of the late John Philips. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Fri, 27 Aug 2004 01:33:08 -0000 From: Margaret G. Still Subject: Re: Benny "Coffee" McCain Previously: > Does any Spectropoper know anything about Benny "Coffee" McCain? > He was another soul vocalist who sang on "She's My Heart's Desire" > by Robert Ward and the Ohio Untouchables (Lupine L-109, a Detroit > based label The liner notes on the only LP I own with cuts by Benny McCain & the Ohio Untouchables doesn't give much info on Bennie McCain, but here's what it says in case you don't have this LP (3 Shades of the Blues / Lupine 8003 / Relic): "The Ohio Untouchables featured the gospel-tinged lead of the late Bennie McCain. Known for their regional hit "She's My Heart's Desire," some of the group later became the Ohio Players. Robert Ward recorded the group mostly at United Sound in downtown Detroit from 1959 to 1961 when Detroit soul was just beginning its greatest days. The unmistakable, haunting guitar of Robert Ward is featured on all the songs that the Ohio Untouchables recorded." There are four cuts on this comp LP with the Ohio Untouchables: "Your Love Is Real" - "I'm Tired" - "Forgive Me Darling" and "Hot Stuff." I'm fairly sure all have been recompiled on Robert Ward or Falcons reissue CD's. All 4 cuts are truly great. Don't know whether the cuts by Eddie Kirkland (backed by the Falcons on 3 of them) on this album have been reissued, but they ought to have been. I love these, and don't care for any of his other recordings. M. G. Still -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Thu, 26 Aug 2004 22:52:02 -0400 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: A Glimpse of Smile Steve Harvey wrote: > Ever read the science fiction novel Glimpses by Lewis Shiner? > The book is about a music fanatic that goes back in time to > all these recording sessions by famous rockers, Brian Wilson, > The Doors, Hendrix, The Beatles, and watches them finish these > legendary albums including Smile. Shiner is definitely into the > Beach Boys Smile sessions. Drops in things like "George Fell > Into His French Horn". Out of print, but definitely a good read > for any Spectropopper who wants to spend the time tracking it down. Along these lines is Paul Quarrington's brilliant "Whale Music." A reviewer on the Amazon site describes it better than I could: > Anyone who has been semi conscious on Earth over the last 40 years > knows that "Whale Music" draws its inspiration from The Beach Boy's > creative genius; Brian Wilson. As I recollect, Mr. Quarrington's > book hit the shelves at about the same time as Mr. Wilson's > autobiography. Having read both, I would choose to re-read 'Whale > Music'. At it's worst, its fictionalized takeoff on the man's life > is extremely entertaining. At its best, it's a great satire of the > media's reporting of Mr. Wilson's every ingested cheeseburger. I > love this book and, I especially love Brian Wilson's contribution > to the world. I will add that the book plumbs Brian's psyche more than it does his stomach. The reviewer, by the way, gave it 5 stars. When I went to Amazon, to refresh my memory on the novelist's name, and typed in the phrase "whale music," Lewis Shiner's "Glimpses" came up in the #1 position, with the book I was actually looking for only in the #2 slot. Both are available, in used copies, for under $2 at Amazon. Dig, --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Fri, 27 Aug 2004 08:28:44 -0000 From: Billy G. Spradlin Subject: Re: Valerie Simpson demo @ musica Mick Patrick wrote: > Today, August 26th, is the birthday of Valerie Simpson. I have > a special interest in the material she wrote in the mid-'60s > when signed to Flo-Mar, the publishing arm of Scepter Records > in New York. You see the Ashford and Simpson (and sometimes > Armstead) credit on a slew of great Scepter and Wand 45s by > Maxine Brown, Candy & the Kisses and many others. At the same > time, over on the West Coast, the team's songs were being cut > by acts like the Apollas and Mary Love. To mark Valerie's > special day, I've posted one of her unissued demos to musica - > "Baby I'll Come", written by Ashford/Simpson: > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/> > Some of you might knnow the version by Mary Love, released on > Modern 1033 in 1966. When I was in Kansas last month I found a 45 by Tina & The Mustangs "I"m Sweet On You" b/w "Smokey Joe's" (Capitol 5562). Both sides produced by David Axelrod. "I'm Sweet On You" was written by Boyce- Hart-Venet and is a sweet waltz-ballad. But the flip was an Simpson- Ashford-Armstead song and it's a super upbeat track. I've Googled and havent found anything about them, so does anyone know anything about this group? Billy http://listen.to/jangleradio -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Fri, 27 Aug 2004 00:19:58 EDT From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: A Glimpse of Smile Steve Harvey wrote: > Ever read the science fiction novel Glimpses by Lewis Shiner? > The book is about a music fanatic that goes back in time to > all these recording sessions by famous rockers, Brian Wilson, > The Doors, Hendrix, The Beatles, and watches them finish these > legendary albums including Smile. Shiner is definitely into the > Beach Boys Smile sessions. Drops in things like "George Fell > Into His French Horn". Out of print, but definitely a good read > for any Spectropopper who wants to spend the time tracking it > down. I read this book soon after it came out and loved it. Obviously written by someone to whom all of this stuff meant a great deal. Besides the specific sessions you mention, the book is filled with much namechecking of great 60s songs by Love, The Left Banke and many others. Your mention makes me want to go back and read it again. Mike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Fri, 27 Aug 2004 04:27:40 -0000 From: Tony Leong Subject: Re: Al Kooper's Landlord Patrick Rands wrote: > I was wondering if anyone could shed some light on why the wonderful > soundtrack for the 1970 movie The Landlord by Al Kooper has not been > issued on CD? ... One of the songs in the movie, "Doin' Me Dirty" by Lorraine Ellison (Valerie Simpson and Tasha Thomas are among the back-up singers), is available on her compilation CD. But how I wish the entire Cd for that great movie was on release. BTW, the apartment building that the Lannie character lived in at the end of the movie is still there!!!! I just wish I knew where in Brooklyn the building that was used throughout the movie was located!!!! Tony Leong -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Fri, 27 Aug 2004 05:13:31 -0000 From: C. Ponti Subject: "98.6" and Keith I was just reminiscing about what a unique song "98.6" was and how it captured an innocent moment in Pop. I searched around the web and discovered that the Tokens sang bg's on the song. Keith was one of the definitive one hit wonders, a description which is not meant to demean, since it is no easy feat to achieve one hit. Does anyone have rememberances or info on Keith or this great cut? C Ponti -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Fri, 27 Aug 2004 05:50:16 -0000 From: Don H. Subject: Goffin and King's Honey and Wine Me: > I have posted "Honey And Wine" by the All Night Workers to musica. > Didn't know there were two groups with that name. Steve Harvey: > Is that the Glenn Yarborough tune that the Hollies did such a great > job on? I should have posted all of the versions of this Goffin/King gem that I know of. I usually do. All Night Workers Back Porch Majority The Great Scots Hamilton Streetcar Hollies Fran Jefferies The Mindbenders Glenn Yarbrough There are also at least two other versions that I have never heard. The Sounds Unlimited and The Why Four (sometimes spelled Y?4). -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Fri, 27 Aug 2004 11:33:54 -0000 From: Lyn Nuttall Subject: Australian versions My new website about the sources of Australian pop records (50s, 60s & 70s) covers a lot of ground familiar to Spectropop members, mainly because Aussie artists & producers cast their nets wide in finding songs to record. I've acknowledged some Spectropop members who've answered some of my questions here. Hope you can have a look... and perhaps point out some errors. It's at http://www.poparchives.com.au Lyn Nuttall (aka Lindsay Martin) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Fri, 27 Aug 2004 11:57:01 -0400 From: Joe Nelson Subject: Re: Dickie Lee Ed Salamon: > PS: I now live in Nashville, where I get the chance to hang out > with Dickey and S'Popper Austin from time to time. Do you remember > "Hello This Is Joanie" by S'Popper Paul Evans? Another WHN hit, > that only cracked the national Country chart. Listrening to it now! Next up on the jukebox, Dickey's "9,999,999 Tears", another WHN classic. Austin, if you ever need to pay tribute to Dickey live for his role in making "Rocky" a hit, try your hand at this. A masterpiece in Dickey's hands, bound to be a masterwork in yours. Ed: You might be interested in knowing that about a year ago I located a copy of Lee Arnold's "A Trucker's Christmas". Lee recorded this in 1976, when he was starting to get noticed in Nashville for his mic skills but before Lee started his syndicated "On A Country Road" program. Finding the record helped me settle a longstanding argument with my brother. You'll remember when WHN played the song, it ended with Lee saying (as Santa Claus) "merry Christmas, WHN, and good numbers to all", double tracking the last part. I remembered that when they first started playing the record the ending was "merry Christmas to everyone" and the final words were single tracked. Yet my brother insisted Lee recorded the song that way in tribute to his employer, while I said it was a re-recording made to give WHN an exclusive. Well, the record proves me right.It seems to me putting WHN's call letters in from the start would have doiomed the song outside of New York, but I have to ask: did anyone else play this record? Joe Nelson (a little bit country, a little bit rock and roll...) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Fri, 27 Aug 2004 06:18:51 EDT From: Al Kooper Subject: Tom Dowd Bill George: > Jackie DeShannon's Memphis LP has (Tom Dowd's) "trademark" distortion > on it, as do the extra unreleased tracks that came out on Rhino last > year. The producer couldn't clean them up. But in my opinion, it > really gives the tracks that vintage sound, and what an amazing sound > it was. Pure magic (and soul) in the studio. I think you need to seperately focus on the fact that magic was going on in the studio i.e. great players, great artists, great songs. Now wouldn't it have sounded even better if magic had been going on in the control room ???/ I think so from my experiences.... Al -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Fri, 27 Aug 2004 16:41:12 EDT From: Bob Rashkow Subject: Re: Paul (Stefan) & the Pack Thank you, Gary Myers, for the information! Actually, what little I do know about Paul Stefan's recording career I learned from Jerry Osborne's record guide. I heard something he did years ago (possibly one of his solo singles from 1963 or so on Cuca or Dot) that a friend had and I remembered really loving it. What I found out through S'pop today is that the Royal Lancers predated the Bobby Fuller 4, didn't know that; and according to Osborne he also recorded with Danny Peil and Vilas Craig (I think they were actually both in the Royal Lancers). Peil was in The Corporation in the late 6Ts, a fantastic psych-soul band in their own right; excellent LP on Capitol. Bobster -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Fri, 27 Aug 2004 16:43:58 EDT From: Bob Rashkow Subject: Re: Dickie Lee, The Robbs Most of Dickie Lee's 1965-1969 output is on my want list. (I don't think I've heard any of it though.) Let's hear it for the Donaldson brothers!!! aka The Robbs!! At last on CD!!!! It was a race with the wind but they made it!!! Groove on. Bobster -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Sat, 28 Aug 2004 00:11:29 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Early Ashford & Simpson Songs / Smokey Joe's / Tina & the Mustangs Billy G. Spradlin: > When I was in Kansas last month I found a 45 by Tina & The > Mustangs "I'm Sweet On You" b/w "Smokey Joe's" (Capitol 5562). > Both sides produced by David Axelrod. "I'm Sweet On You" was > written by Boyce-Hart-Venet and is a sweet waltz-ballad. But > the flip was an Simpson-Ashford-Armstead song and it's a super > upbeat track. I've Googled and haven't found anything about > them, so does anyone know anything about this group? If you like "Smokey Joe's" by Tina & the Mustangs, maybe you should watch out for the versions by the Jewels, Donna Loren and Candy & the Kisses, all of which are just as good, if not better. The Jewels actually recorded the song twice, for two different labels. Dunno very much about Tina & the Mustangs, except I *think* Tina subsequently recorded solo for Capitol as Tina Mason. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Fri, 27 Aug 2004 14:02:08 -0700 From: Michael Ggodin Subject: Re: Diamond Masters David Coyle on Masters and distribution: > When a small regional label gets picked up for distribution for > a national label, are the masters sold to the new label, thus > being licensed to that label in the case of reissuing a number > of years down the road? I ask this because I have two records by > the Columbus, Ohio group the Fifth Order (recently the subject > of a full-length CD reissue), both of which came out originally > on a Cincinnati label called Counterpart. The first single "Goin' > Too Far/Walking Away" was picked up by Diamond, while "Today I > Got A Letter/A Thousand Devils" was then distributed by Laurie. > Does that mean that licensing for such records belongs to the > parent company of the redistributing labels, and do the current > executors (for want of a better term) own the original masters? As the former Vice-President of A&M Records, I can give you some direction and possible answers. First and foremost, it would make the answer obvious (or should) if you could uncover the original agreement. In it it would indicate as to whether the masters were purchased by Counterpart/Laurie or just licensed to them from the group (Fifth Order). It should also spell out the length of the term for the agreement; what happens to the label if they enter into a distribution agreement, such as term, reversion of distribution rights to the group. As well the agreement would show if there was the option on the part of Counterpoint/Laurie to buy the masters from the group. If there was no expiry date for the distribution or licensing of the masters from the group, which I believe could be contested, then Counterpart/Laurie, or their subsequent owners, could easily continue to reissue the masters. Unfortunately I do not believe there is a definitive answer. I also underscore the fact that I am not nor have ever been a music industry attorney but had many years in the record business in putting agreements together and negotiating many many deals. Hope this is of some help to you. All the best. Michael Godin Michael Godin Management Inc. Treasure Island Oldies The Home of Lost Treasures http://www.TreasureIslandOldies.com -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Fri, 27 Aug 2004 20:21:51 EDT From: John Berg Subject: Re: Benny "Coffee" McCain / Robert Ward Dear M. G. Still, It was that LP on the Relics label that got me started on my quest to locate Robert Ward. Took me 5 years, but in 1989 I finally connected with him (after many many contacts with people all over the country) down in Dry Branch, Georgia. My phone conversation with him that December led to his "rediscovery" and signing to Black Top records, which released 3 new CDs by Robert, cut in New Orleans. He later cut a final CD for the Delmark label, after Black Top went under. In the meantime, during the early 1990s I went to work tracking down the master tapes for all of Robert's '60s music. Turned out that Relics possessed a few, but the rest were in Detroit. I contacted those people and got Relics to agree to license what they did not possess, in order to compile a complete CD of all the tracks cut by Robert and his band the Ohio Untouchables. In the process we came upon a few previously unissued cuts, included on the CD. I also contacted other band members and came up with the photos used in the CD package. I spoke with Robert at some length during that whole period, and eventually visited him and his wife Roberta at their Dry Branch home -- "way out in the po po patch" as Hammond Scott of Black Top once said. Alas, Robert knows nothing about Benny "Coffee" McCain, so that is why I posted my inquiry to the Spectropop group. John Berg -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Fri, 27 Aug 2004 19:11:39 -0700 (PDT) From: Karen Andrew Subject: Re: Patty Duke to get her star I'm so far behind in these e-mails - just to Aug. 18! But I wanted to thank Louis Wendruck for posting the photo of Patty Duke receiving her star on Hollywood Blvd. Doesn't Patty look great?! Good for her! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Fri, 27 Aug 2004 19:21:37 -0700 (PDT) From: Karen Andrew Subject: Re: Goldmine Ed Salamon: > ... I have subscribed to Goldmine since the '70s, and Discoveries > since it began, and hung in hoping things would get better, but > when my current subs run out, I'm gone. They must believe that > they can attract a younger (and larger) audience by writing about > more recent music, which -- regardless of its merits -- is just > not as collected. This current mindset in the media and other aspects of society that youth is better is frightening. I work for a newspaper and a number of age 50-plus people have been eliminated one way or the other. Also, they want to appeal to the "young professionals". It is frightening to all of us who are considered old by those in power especially when we still have a few good years left. This is all strange to me as the largest part of the population is the Baby Boomers! Hello! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Sat, 28 Aug 2004 00:25:25 -0000 From: Billy G. Spradlin Subject: Looking For Jaynetts I'm looking to hear the Jaynettes' instrumental b-sides, and any rare non-LP singles the group recorded as The Z-Debs, Hearts, Patty Cakes, Clickettes and Poppies. If anyone can help please e-mail me off list. Thanks! There's a good discography at: http://www.soulfulkindamusic.net/jaynettes.htm Billy http://listen.to/jangleradio -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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