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Spectropop - Digest Number 1607



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 16 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: Patty Duke to get her star
           From: ModGirl 
      2. Re: Totally transformed oldies
           From: Tom Taber 
      3. Re: Dick Clark Sells Old Footage
           From: Bryan 
      4. Re: Goldmine
           From: Robert Beason 
      5. Re: Jim Ford = Jimmy Forde?
           From: Phil X Milstein 
      6. Ron Dante's birthday comin' up
           From: Laura Pinto 
      7. Lenny Welch
           From: Steve Harvey 
      8. Re: Totally transformed oldies
           From: Gary Myers 
      9. Neil Merryweather
           From: Dan Hughes 
     10. Re: Just Four Men/Wimple Winch
           From: John Berg 
     11. Re: Jimmy Forde = Jim Ford?
           From: David L Gordon 
     12. more transformed oldies
           From: Gary Myers 
     13. more transformed oldies
           From: Austin Roberts 
     14. Re: gold star for Gold Star
           From: Austin Roberts 
     15. Re: Where Does A R&R Singer Go?
           From: Frankie Bee 
     16. Hickory discog?
           From: Danny D 


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Message: 1 Date: Mon, 16 Aug 2004 20:48:54 -0000 From: ModGirl Subject: Re: Patty Duke to get her star Louis Wendruck wrote: > Patty Duke will finally be getting her star on Hollywood Walk of > Fame on August 17, 2004 at 10:30 AM. YAAAY! I have always been a fan and she deserves it all the more for being "a famous person" who was brave and honest enough to talk about her battle with manic-depression publicly. God bless her! A hot dog makes her lose control, ModGirl -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 05:41:50 -0700 (PDT) From: Tom Taber Subject: Re: Totally transformed oldies Country Paul wrote: > Which brings up another possible thread: rock classics totally > transformed stylistically and given another meaning or thoroughly > different spin in the process. A favorite of mine is the Mojo [Men] version of "Don't Be Cruel," on Reprise. Tom Taber -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 06:59:56 -0700 From: Bryan Subject: Re: Dick Clark Sells Old Footage Mike wrote: > I got an e-mail from another newsgroup where someone > mentioned that Dick Clark has just sold all of his old clips. > Does anyone know anything about this? This happened back in 2002. Dick Clark Productions, Inc. was aquired by an investment group for approximately $136 million. Dick Clark serves as CEO and Chairman for the production company, who still produce and license their clips of TV programs to major TV and cable networks, in addition to licensing the rebroadcast rights to some of the programs they own, and licensing short clips to third parties, etc. Bryan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 07:11:44 -0700 (PDT) From: Robert Beason Subject: Re: Goldmine Country Paul wrote: > I notice little or no mention of Goldmine or Discoveries, > my two major resources before my knowledge of Spectropop. > Do folks here (still) subscribe to them? I no longer do. I was a faithful Goldmine reader for several years, until the mid 90s when the publisher sacked editor Jeff Tamarkin and replaced him with a new guy who promptly shifted the magazine's focus from 50s/60s rock and R&B to 70s/80s and such genres as heavy metal and hip-hop. Except for the occasional Elvis and Beatles issues, anything recorded before the early 70s was totally ignored. I haven't seen an issue in years -- has this sad situation changed any? Bob Beason -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 11:57:26 +0000 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: Jim Ford = Jimmy Forde? Country Paul: > Let's try one more from the thoroughly-obscure want list: > Jimmy Ford[e], "Be Mine Forever," Stylo (possibly #2102, > 1963 or so). I > think that's the number, and I don't remember > if he spelled it with an "e" or not. It's a southern ballad with > girl-group backing; it may be a B-side. Norm D. asked: > Is this the same Jim Forde of "Harlan County" fame, who > wrote other songs later covered by Nick Lowe? Can't help > you at all with your request, but just curious about the singer. > I heard his great "Harlan County" on the radio last night > BBC Radio 3 of all places. I can't answer Norm's question, but I can pass along some b.g. info on the Jim Ford he refers to. The entire "Harlan County" album is great, highlighted by the title cut and Alex Harvey's "To Make My Life Beautiful." To my mind Ford belongs in the same category as Joe South, Billy Joe Royal and Tony Joe White, whatever that might be called (as the term "swamp pop" seems already taken by a slightly different brand of music). Bryan Thomas authored the following piece on Jim Ford for All Music Guide. Until reading it I hadn't realized he'd been behind so many cool songs. Dig, --Phil M. P.S. Speaking of Joe South, anyone know of any CDs (in print, preferably) that include his version of his own "Leanin' On You"? -------------------- Originally from New Orleans, Jim Ford lost interest in his academic pursuits and, in 1966, drifted out to California. He was passing through L.A., on his way to the Haight-Ashbury district in San Francisco, when he met two session musicians, Pat and Lolly Vegas. The Native American rockers -- who later formed the commercially successful Redbone -- had worked on the Shindig television show at the time, and had already recorded their Pat and Lolly Vegas at the Haunted House album for Mercury. After hearing his songwriting talent first-hand, the Vegas brothers brought Ford to the attention of Del-Fi Records' honcho Bob Keane, known around the L.A. music scene for his "open door policy." Keane released a couple of Ford's singles on Del-Fi's Mustang label, both of which sank without a trace. Del-Fi/Bronco recording artist Viola Wills also recorded one of his songs. Along with Pat and Lolly Vegas, Ford wrote the P.J. Proby hit "Niki Hoeky" (it peaked at number 23 on Billboard's pop charts in January 1967), which Ford's former girlfriend Bobbie Gentry also sang on one of her later albums. In 1969, Ford got the opportunity to record his debut album. Harlan County (released on the Sundown label, a small subsidiary of White Whale) featured funky, mid-tempo country, and R&B-flavored rockers with a driving Muscle Shoals-style rhythm section, with backing and arrangements by the Vegas brothers and Gene Page. Most of Ford's original songs had a lyrical narrative recalling the hardship of growing up in the coal-mining country of Harlan County, KY. Among the various highlights are his fuzz-drenched cover version of Willie Dixon's "Spoonful," his take on Delaney & Bonnie's hip-shake boogie "Long Road Ahead," and a remake of the swampy classic "I'm Gonna Make Her Love Me ('Til the Cows Come Home)." In 1971, Ford's manager, Si Waronker (founder of Liberty Records), flew his artist to London, where he was booked into Olympic Studios to record a follow-up album. This time he was backed by pub rockers Brinsley Schwartz (they later recorded "Niki Hoeky" and Ford's "Ju Ju Man"; Nick Lowe also recorded Ford's "36 Inches High" for his Jesus of Cool album). After three days of sessions, the band failed to keep up to the challenge of backing Ford, so Waronker brought in Joe Cocker's Grease Band, but they too didn't work out. As the project never did quite meet up to everyone's expectations, it was eventually aborted. The tapes for these sessions have reportedly disappeared. Ford returned to the U.S. and his career never really took off as expected. He wrote songs for Bobby Womack in 1972 (including the wonderful "Harry Hippie"), and later worked with friend Sly Stone (he even moved into Stone's Holmby Hills home for awhile), but since the early '70s, Ford has slipped out of sight. Harlan County was reissued on the British Edsel label in 1997. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 16:20:09 -0000 From: Laura Pinto Subject: Ron Dante's birthday comin' up Spectropop fave Ron Dante will be turning 39 years young (again) this coming Sunday, August 22. Anyone who would like to post a birthday greeting for him can do so by visiting this link: http://tinyurl.com/4h5q4 This is a special guestbook that was set up just for Ron's birthday, so that people can add their own messages. Feel free to write as much as you'd like. Pplease add your greeting within the next couple of days, because seeing as how Ron's birthday falls on a Sunday he'll probably be a busy guy all weekend and I'd like to get this virtual birthday card to him early Saturday if possible. I'd love to see Spectropop members well-represented in this guestbook. Thanks so much! Laura -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 10:05:02 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Lenny Welch Just got a used copy of Lenny Welch's CD Anthology on Taragon Records, MCA. Besides the obvious inclusion of "Since I Fell" (which starts with a little studio chatter) two other cuts stand out, "Father Sebastian" and "Darling Take Me Back". The former has nothing to do with John B., but is a clever "confessional" plea with a kind ofItalian feel to it. The latter definitely sounds like it was written after listening closely to the Walker Brothers' version of "Make It Easy On Yourself". Very bombastic. Anyone know any inside stuff on these two tunes? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 10:24:33 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: Re: Totally transformed oldies Country Paul wrote: > ... another possible thread: rock classics totally transformed > stylistically and given another meaning or thoroughly different > spin in the process. Well, Paul, you previously mentioned Larry Bright's "I Saw Her Standing There". I recall seeing Pet Clark do "I Want To Hold Your Hand" as a ballad on some TV show, and I really dug the '80s Lakeside version. Also, Dion's "Purple Haze". gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 05:49:38 -0500 From: Dan Hughes Subject: Neil Merryweather An old friend of Neil Merryweather's is trying to reestablish contact, and I thought somebody in this group might be able to help us locate him. Neil was married to Lynn Carey, whose Mama Lion album, with that unbelievable cover, I'm sure you remember .... Buzz me privately at danhughes@juno.com. Thanks! ---Dan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 14:13:46 EDT From: John Berg Subject: Re: Just Four Men/Wimple Winch Compilations of all the Wimple Winch material were released on LP and later CD by Bam Caruso and maybe another label in the 1990s. Well worth searching out, as they included some of the Just Four Men material and plenty of other cool music. John Berg -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 18:39:54 -0000 From: David L Gordon Subject: Re: Jimmy Forde = Jim Ford? Norm D. asked: > Is this the same Jim Forde of "Harlan County" fame, who > wrote other songs later covered by Nick Lowe? Can't help > you at all with your request, but just curious about the singer. > I heard his great "Harlan County" on the radio last night > BBC Radio 3 of all places. I believe so -- the spelling seems to vary between Ford and Forde. Very interesting guy. He went on to become co-writer of some of Bobby Womack's biggest records, "Harry Hippie" for one. He also did the original of Redbone's "Crazy Cajun Cakewalk Band". I tried researching his career about two years ago if I can find my notes I'll post them (he said with fingers crossed) Davie -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 10:41:11 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: more transformed oldies Country Paul wrote: > ... another possible thread: rock classics totally transformed > stylistically and given another meaning or thoroughly different > spin in the process. * Todd Rundgren's "Cool Jerk" in 7/4 * Freddie Scott's "I Got A Woman", also done in a similar style a few years later by Al Kooper (and, Al, I have that 45). * Bobby Rydell's "Diana" * Lenny Welch's "Breaking Up Is Hard To Do", which, of course, was later done that way by Neil. gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 16:10:39 EDT From: Austin Roberts Subject: more transformed oldies My favorite, I think, is the Arbors' version of The Letter. Austin (former Arbors producer, but unfortunately not of their hits) Roberts -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 16:13:53 EDT From: Austin Roberts Subject: Re: gold star for Gold Star Peter Richmond wrote: > As promised I have put the three scans of the Gold Star Recording > Studio invoices sent to Philles Records relating to the recording > sessions of "I Can't Make It Alone" that was intended for the > Righteous Brothers. These are under the Righteous Brothers/Spector > Collectors items I think Gold Star's reverb was the best I've ever heard. I think Scott McKenzie told me they had cut San Francisco there. Does anyone know for sure? (I've lost track of Scott.) Austin R. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 21:35:46 -0000 From: Frankie Bee Subject: Re: Where Does A R&R Singer Go? RP wrote: > I believe that was Artie Wayne (who is a member of this list.) Many thanks to RP, Mikey and Artie! You helped me a lot with your info -- I've already ordered The Teenage Dreams CD. But one thing is really scary: Artie Wayne posted a message about his song just before my question about it, although I didn't know the singer's name at the time. Oooh ... spooky! Best wishes to the whole gang, Frankie Bee -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Tue, 17 Aug 2004 19:37:19 +0100 (BST) From: Danny D Subject: Hickory discog? Does anyone know where I could find a 45s discography for Hickory Records? I know Dan Fogelberg wrote some songs for The Newbeats on this label. Thanks for any help, >From yet another Dan (in Dublin) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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