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Spectropop - Digest Number 1590



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 23 messages in this issue.


Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: recordin' in America
           From: Eddy Smit 
      2. NY studio bass players
           From: Niels 
      3. Re: J.B. Great
           From: Phil X Milstein 
      4. Re: comparing notes
           From: Gary Myers 
      5. Re: back in the U.K.
           From: Andrew Hickey 
      6. Re: Stevie Wright
           From: Mike McKay 
      7. Re: Bert Berns' British productions
           From: Mick Patrick 
      8. Re: Who in America
           From: Al Kooper 
      9. Re: The Neighborhood
           From: Gary Myers 
     10. Re: today's Rascals
           From: Leslie Fradkin 
     11. Re: The New Rascals
           From: Mikey 
     12. Spelling lesson
           From: Al Kooper 
     13. Re: The Neighborhood
           From: Frank Jastfelder 
     14. "4,003,221 Tears From Now"
           From: Tony Baylis 
     15. Re: RCA's NYC Studios
           From: Brian 
     16. Re: what is Northern Soul?
           From: Frank Murphy 
     17. Re: French Scopitone "Zizi la Twisteuse"
           From: Frank 
     18. Ten Years After cover of an Al Kooper song?
           From: Scott 
     19. Re: Northern Soul & Beach Music
           From: Andy 
     20. Re: NY studio bass players
           From: Artie Butler 
     21. Re: NY studio bass players
           From: Leslie Fradkin 
     22. Re: Spring Fever / Cherry Cherry
           From: David Walker 
     23. Re: Stevie Wright - Easybeats
           From: Lex Cody 


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Message: 1 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 12:08:39 +0200 From: Eddy Smit Subject: Re: recordin' in America Phil M. wrote > I never knew The Who recorded in the U.S. I know that the Stones did, > extensively and from early on, and this new (to me) information on The > Who ... Lewisohn's book gives you the exact details on where The Beatles recorded. Off the top of my head, I'd say they never recorded outside of the UK, the lone exception being the German vocals of Sie Liebt Dich & Komm gibt mir deine Hand, which were taped in France. As for The Who, they also recorded at the Record Plant East in March 1971 for Lifehouse. Although nothing of these sessions was used for Who's Next, one track turned up on Odds & Sodds and as bonus material on the expanded Who's Next CD. Btw, Call Me Lightning was recorded at Gold Star! Eddy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 11:22:42 +0200 From: Niels Subject: NY studio bass players To follow up on my succesful enquiry about NY studio musicians, I'd like to know if anyone knows where Russ Savakus (session bass player, mainly on the folk-rock-blues scene in the fifties and sixties) has been since the early seventies. Likewise with Bob Bushnell, who developed a certain bass technique. Does anybody know more about these great musicians? Maybe somebody who worked with them back then can tell about playing with them. Niels. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 10:18:05 +0000 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: J.B. Great Neils Chr Junker-Poulsen wrote: > ... but please, please, PLEASE tell me more about Johnny B. Great > and Brenda & Johnny, Elaine & Derek. And when were they done? I wouldn't mind hearing a little about Johnny B. Great in general. One of my favorite Scopitones is of him playing a rockin' version of "If I Had A Hammer" to the writhing enjoyment of a gaggle of discotheque dancers of various races and genders (and quite possibly religions, as well). Apart from that one clip, though, I've never even heard his name. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 10:11:11 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: Re: comparing notes previously: > "Oh! Pretty Woman" ... The song's biggest "hook" was obviously > all those guitars banging out that eight-note E7 riff in unison ... Tom Taber wrote: > I have tried to "think" how those guitars sound - and everytime I do, > what I come up with is the guitars from Simon and Garfunkel's > "Hazy Shade of Winter"! Are they quite similar, or just in my addled > mind? I'd have to listen to be sure, but I think the first few notes might be the same. However, the same notes as "Pretty Woman" (outlining an E9 chord) were also used by Jose Feliciano on the E7 chord at the end of the verse on "Light My Fire". And, that run is somewhat similar to the line on "Day Tripper", which adds a G note chromatically approaching the G#. gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 17:02:58 +0100 From: Andrew Hickey Subject: Re: back in the U.K. Phil M. wrote > I never knew The Who recorded in the U.S. I know that the Stones did, > extensively and from early on, and this new (to me) information on The > Who leads me to wonder if The Beatles ever did as well. Not unless you count the various live recordings (Live At The Hollywood Bowl). Almost all the Beatles' recordings were at Abbey Road. They recorded Hey Jude at another studio (I *think* called Trident, but I can't be sure -- don't have my Lewisohn nearby), recorded a couple of tracks in Paris in 1964, and recorded some tracks during the Let It Be era at Apple, but other than that everything was at Abbey Road. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 15:01:54 EDT From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: Stevie Wright Lex Cody wrote: > Also, this Thursday Stevie Wright is launching a new Bio. Stevie > has been involved with this project and it's fully approved! One > came out a few years ago which I believe he wasnt too happy with. > He will be performing 4 songs I believe at the book launch here > in Melbourne. Does this mean that Stevie's fortunes have improved recently? I recall reading a lengthy article not too many years ago that painted a horrific picture of his life, replete with chronic drug addiction and a host of other woes. Mike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 20:15:50 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Bert Berns' British productions Neils Chr Junker-Poulsen wrote: > ...It really was a shame about that CD of Bert Berns' British > singles. We could without the Them tracks. Everybody knows them > anyway, and I got the Lulu ones, and Moses K as well. I know > about Redcaps and The Orchids, ... but please, please, PLEASE > tell me more about Johnny B Great and Brenda & Johnny, Elaine & > Derek. And when were they done? Sure. The following tracks were all produced by Bert Berns at Decca Studios, London: JOHNNY B. GREAT - YOUíLL NEVER LEAVE HIM (UK Decca 11804) (aka Johnny Goodison) BRENDA AND JOHNNY - THIS CANíT BE LOVE (UK Decca 11837) (Brenda Boswell and Johnny B. Great) ELAINE & DEREK - TEDDY BEARS AND HOBBY HORSES/JOSE HE SAY (US Parrot 9718) (Derek became a famous TV actor) Neils: > Also, The Orchids themselves tell, that their session with Bert > Berns took place in 1963, which seems highly unlikely to me. I > think, the first time he went to England was that October in > 1964. Actually, Bert Berns made three trips to the UK: in October 1963, October '64 and March '65. On his first visit he produced tracks by acts from the Larry Page stable, all from Coventry, including the Orchids. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 15:22:52 EDT From: Al Kooper Subject: Re: Who in America Phil M. wrote > I never knew The Who recorded in the U.S. I know that the Stones did, > extensively and from early on, and this new (to me) information on The > Who ... Chroniceled in the liner notes to the expanded edition of "The Who Sell Out," from about four years ago, if I recall correctly. Al K -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 12:13:40 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: Re: The Neighborhood Paul Richards wrote: > If I remember correctly the B-side to the Neighbourhood's Big Yellow > Taxi was a disappointing cover of The Free Design's 'You Could be > Born Again'. Although I'm not familiar with that song, I checked to see that you are correct. Neighborhood was produced by James Bryant, a guy from Wisconsin, hence my interest. gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 13:25:59 -0600 From: Leslie Fradkin Subject: Re: today's Rascals Kurt Benbenek wrote: > Felix Caveliere and his band were excellent. All of the Rascals > hits (and many, many covers) were done superbly and with much > enthusiasm. Phil M. asked: > So this lineup includes Felix, Dino and Gene? Someone had previously > mentioned only the latter two. There are two Rascals groups -- one with Felix and one with Gene and Dino. Les -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 14:49:53 -0400 From: Mikey Subject: Re: The New Rascals Phil M. asked: > So this lineup includes Felix, Dino and Gene? Someone had previously > mentioned only the latter two. Can't be Felix, Dino and Gene together ... impossible. It's gotta be Gene and Dino in one band, and Felix in the other. Gene and Dino don't care for Felix, because Felix had his lawyers try to claim the name "The Rascals" out from under the other three, who own it collectively. Now, if Dino, Gene and Eddie played, I'd go see them. That's a very close version of the band. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 15:31:06 EDT From: Al Kooper Subject: Spelling lesson When one works with Bill Szymczyk (somebody buy this guy a vowel!), as I have in the past, one is taught by the master himself that it's S, zy, mc, zy, k. The memory trick is the mc surrounded by zy(s). Hope this helps. Al Kooper Olympic Polish Spelling Trainer Athens, Grease -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 21:35:49 +0200 From: Frank Jastfelder Subject: Re: The Neighborhood Paul Richards wrote: > If I remember correctly the B-side to the Neighbourhood's Big Yellow > Taxi was a disappointing cover of The Free Design's 'You Could Be > Born Again'. Not an easy task to set oneself though. Good on them for > trying. As far as I know, they were the only ones to dabble in this great tune. Like you said it was a tough one to follow the Free Design. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 19:35:38 -0000 From: Tony Baylis Subject: "4,003,221 Tears From Now" Artie Wayne wrote: > I started writing and working for publishers during the early > sixties and learned the value of recordings from countries > other than the United States early on. I had my first > international hit in Austrailia with "4,003,221 Tears From > Now" [Raleigh/Wayne], by Judy Stone. I have a US red vinyl promo of "4,003,221" by Kerri Downs (Epic JZSP 76387), arranged by Ray Stevens. The flip, "Don't Cross Over (To My Side Of The Street)," is by another artist, Linda Brannon, and was written by D. Hess and C. Monte. Both sides shoulda been hits! Tony Baylis -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 15:38:34 EDT From: Brian Subject: Re: RCA's NYC Studios Mikey wrote: > Sad ending -- Baruch college tore the building down in 2000. I work at Baruch College and am sitting in the replacement building as I'm writing. This monstrosity is easy to spot -- it has unaffectionately been dubbed "The Silver Armadillo" by neighbors. I'll spare you the details on what's wrong with this structure. Nearly an entire square block was razed to make room for it. So much for progress. The RCA studio was at 155 E. 24th St., between Lexington and 3rd Aves. It was built in 1907 as a seven-story stable by the Fiss, Doerr & Carroll Horse Company. On the wall of my office, I have a framed architect's rendering of the old building, which I rescued when we were relocated. Brian -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 20:24:46 +0000 From: Frank Murphy Subject: Re: what is Northern Soul? Margaret G Still wrote: > But what is considered Northern Soul doesn't seem to include Muscle > Shoals or Stax or Malaco or deep soul, or most Southern U.S. soul. It does include stuff from Muscle Shoals, for instance "Tell Mama" by Etta James. Stax The Spoiler "Eddie Purrell" and Malaco like Clarence Carter's "Messin Up My Mind." > I've read that this difference was just something that developed > from regional differences in taste, but the collector told me that > what came to be called "Northern Soul" was from a huge batch of > obscure R&B/Soul records that a British collector & club owner > scored on a U.S. trip, and then played in his club. It does seem > to be true that "Northern Soul" focuses on soul music from the more > obscure labels, though I'm pretty sure Okeh Records is considered > Northern Soul." Northern Soul is a dance scene that developed out of the early sixties club scene in the UK, and certainly it developed into a rare records scene. People had been bringing over records from the States for years. American record companies and stores would sell records to UK fans, and Ian Levine and others went on buying trips and many still do. There are a number of books outlining the history of the scene, and it is a scene of many variants rather than a single sound. And whilst most of the records are soul records the latest hot hit "Heartaches Is All You Got" comes from the north of Sweden actually, and is to my ears a very Malaco-sounding piece of soulful blues by Sven Zetterberg. S'poppers may know Bob Kuban and The Cheater, another "northern Soul" classic of the scene's early days. Whilst we may go out and catch the occasional band, thousands of Northern Soul fans still go out each weekend to dance to records from the sixties and seventies. Rather than read about it head for www.radiomagnetic.com/archive/rnb.php and click on any of the seven shows listed under "reflections". Do not be surprised to hear some Latin grooves, as Bugalu is also regarded as a "northern soul" source of good dance records. And you may catch the occasional record from the Okeh vaults, such as Sandie Sheldon, Billy Butler and usually Major Lance. FrankM reflections on northern soul Saturday's two thirty pm www.radiomagnetic.com or listen to an archive show www.radiomagnetic.com/archive/rnb.php -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 04:36:44 +0200 From: Frank Subject: Re: French Scopitone "Zizi la Twisteuse" This Scopitone was one of the most popular of the many French-produced ones, even though the song remained unknown it became a sort of cult classic because of its heavily erotic content and also because it was one of the first, if not the first, directed by Claude Lelouch. Frank -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Mon, 02 Aug 2004 23:11:25 EDT From: Scott Subject: Ten Years After cover of an Al Kooper song? I just bought a copy of Ten Years After's 1967 debut and the album includes a track credited to "Kooper": "I Can't Keep From Crying, Sometimes." Just curious if our Al Kooper wrote it and if he's ever heard it. Scott -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 21:12:06 -0000 From: Andy Subject: Re: Northern Soul & Beach Music Myrtle Beach, SC is still a "HUGE" beach music spot. They live and breathe this stuff. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 17:05:05 EDT From: Artie Butler Subject: Re: NY studio bass players Regarding the bass players Russ Savakus & Bob Bushnell, sadly they are both gone. I used them both in my early days in the business. Bob Bushnell was the sweetest and most classy guy you ever could want to meet. I remember he was always dressed in a suit and tie. A class act and a very soft-spoken guy. He also always drove a Thunderbird. As a young guy, you remember things like that. Russ Savakus was one of the busier players as well. Artie Butler -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 15:35:53 -0600 From: Leslie Fradkin Subject: Re: NY studio bass players Niels: > To follow up on my succesful enquiry about NY studio musicians, I'd > like to know if anyone knows where Russ Savakus (session bass player, > mainly on the folk-rock-blues scene in the fifties and sixties) has > been since the early seventies. Likewise with Bob Bushnell, who developed > a certain bass technique. Does anybody know more about these great > musicians? Maybe somebody who worked with them back then can tell > about playing with them. I knew Russ well. He played bass on the B-Side ("You Can Cry If You Want To") (1970) of my MGM single. He, of course, played on "Like A Rolling Stone" which was one of the reasons I wanted him on my date that day. I can't be positive, but I heard he died several years back. He lived in the rural area of Pennsylvania when I knew him. A very nice man and a great bassist. He played a Fender Jazz Bass as I recall. Don Thomas played on this session for me as well. I never knew Bob Bushnell. Regards, Les Fradkin -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Wed, 04 Aug 2004 08:04:37 +1000 From: David Walker Subject: Re: Spring Fever / Cherry Cherry Re: Clark Besch > As I look back now, I hear the sound heard in Barry/Greenwich/ > Diamond's hit production, "Cherry, Cherry" at that time also. I was listening to this only last night. Great song, great sound and a great album, "Shilo". I will have to give it another listen and catch the sound. > Anyone remember "Spring Fever" on the radio then? According to Gavin Ryan's Australian Chart Book series, Tony Pass hit #5 in Adelaide for 10 weeks in 1966 leaving the charts in October 1966. I remember how listeners would ring into the top forty stations and request Spring Fever by Tommy Roe and how the announcers would have to try and convince them it was Tony Pass, without knowing a thing about the guy. (Tommy Roe was very popular down under. 18 chart entries from 1962 - 1971). Even today, apart from the most hardened quiz buffs, if the question was posed who sang "Spring Fever" most who remember the song would say Tommy Roe. Regards, David Walker -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2004 17:41:18 -0700 (PDT) From: Lex Cody Subject: Re: Stevie Wright - Easybeats I wrote: > Also, this Thursday Stevie Wright is launching a new bio. Stevie > has been involved with this project and it's fully approved! One > came out a few years ago which I believe he wasnt too happy with. > He will be performing 4 songs I believe at the book launch here > in Melbourne. Mike McKay replied: >> Does this mean that Stevie's fortunes have improved recently? >> I recall reading a lengthy article not too many years ago that >> painted a horrific picture of his life, replete with chronic >> drug addiction and a host of other woes. Im not sure. I know that the bio was written from hundreds of hours of recorded interviews that Glen Goldsmith made and then compiled; Stevies totally approved it. He's done the odd gig here 'n' there, and will be performing at the launch. I read the horrid tale too of drugs etc., but I don't know how bad it was. I did hear that it was over-sensationalised, but not to what extent. A bio came out a few years ago that I understand Stevie wasn't happy about; he had some participation in that one, but my understanding is it too went too far in certain details that were apparently hyped. Will let you know how the launch goes and how he performs. Lex -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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