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Spectropop - Digest Number 1533



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. Re: basslessness
           From: Steve Harvey 
      2. The Everys (& Garfunkel & Simon)
           From: Steve Harvey 
      3. Alice in Beatleland
           From: Steve Harvey 
      4. Ventures vs. Shadows
           From: Steve Harvey 
      5. Re: The Everlys (Garfunkel & Simon)
           From: Al Kooper 
      6. Re: basslessness
           From: Mike McKay 
      7. Re: basslessness
           From: Al Kooper 
      8. Re: passing Rascals
           From: Mike McKay 
      9. Robert Nix
           From: Al Kooper 
     10. Now playing: "Dina" at musica
           From: Country Paul 
     11. Re: basslessness / Pete records
           From: Andy 
     12. Re: Garfunkel & Simon
           From: Gary Myers 
     13. Re: organic music
           From: Joe Nelson 
     14. "Get Rid Of Him"
           From: Mick Patrick 
     15. Re: So Goes Carole / basslessness
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     16. Re: lead singers who didn't always sing lead
           From: Joe Nelson 
     17. Re: basslessness
           From: Artie Wayne 
     18. Re: basslessness / Cozy speaks / Beach Boys covers
           From: Dennis Diken 
     19. Re: Sick Manny's Gym
           From: Al Kooper 
     20. Re: basslessness
           From: Gary Myers 
     21. Re: basslessness
           From: Gary Myers 
     22. backstage with Brother Ray
           From: Steve Harvey 
     23. Hank Marvin radio interview
           From: Norm D. Plume 
     24. Terry Rice-Milton
           From: Rob Stride 
     25. Re: fading Nuggets
           From: Steve Harvey 


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Message: 1 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 12:07:58 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: basslessness I still find it strange that certain bands got by with no bass onstage. The Doors and Young Rascals are two more bassless groups (Hey Eddie, dump the tambourine and yourself a bass!) The thing is that both bands did use bassists on their records. I know the bassist for Clear Light (another Elektra group) played on some of the Doors stuff. I think studio ace, Chuck Rainey, played on some Rascals material. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 11:58:40 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: The Everys (& Garfunkel & Simon) Robert wrote: > As for the Everlys, why are they only doing four songs? Is this by > choice? My mouth has remained permanently agape since recently > discovering their '60s Warner Bros. catalog. This is some of the > most amazing music ever made! I can't believe they had so few hits > during this time. They seemed to have hits throughout the 60s in Europe, but America dropped them for the newest flavor (which, oddly enough, owed more than a little to the brothers). What happened with the 2-for series that was coming out on Warner Bros? Glad I didn't send any money to that Kentucky site that had pictures of their future two-fors. I think they started with the wrong lps. In Our Own Image, Two Yanks would have been far stronger releases to start with than the ones they chose. I had to burn CDs from vinyl. Scratchy, but I can listen to them in the car. I agree, only 4 songs by Don and Phil?! What were they thinking? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 12:16:01 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Alice in Beatleland Just got done watching the DVD of Alice In Wonderland, a 1966 BBC production. I'm sure the Beatles must have watched this version too. There are alot of Beatle connections. The soundtrack is by Ravi Shankar. Both Wilfrid Brambell (Paul's granddad in A Heard Day's Night) and Leo McKern (the high priest in Help) both appear in it. Other Beatle associates like Peter Sellers (Goons star and Ringo's costar) and Peter Cook (LS Bumble Bee) pop up as well. It's filmed in b&w, like alot of British films from that decade (including HD'sN), which gives it the dreamy quality the director wanted. I know Lennon was fascinated with the book as a child. Not surprising given all the wordplay in it (Spaniard In the Works). A surreal portrayal of Victorian society (no animals head on the actors) which probably influences the direction Sgt. Pepper's took shortly after this was broadcast. At times it drags a little, but it's definately a time capulse from the swingin' 60s. ===== Flip, flop and fly, Steve Harvey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 12:24:12 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Ventures vs. Shadows Mikey wrote: > Since it's the last word on the second greatest > Instrumental Group in the world (after The Ventures, > of course) I hope they did it right. I don't know about that, Mikey. As much as I love the Ventures I think the Shadows had the edge over them. Their material was generally stronger (thanks to Jerry Lordan) that alot of the Ventures' stuff. I will always love the Ventures for putting out those instructional records (Why don't more bands do this? DVDs for heaven's sake!), but they seemed content to copy the hits of the moment. Their original material wasn't as strong as the Shadows. When I met the Ventures a few years back I asked Bob Boggle about the Shadows and the Ventures recording together. He said the closest they ever got was meeting Bruce Welch in Japan once. It would have been interesting to hear them together. What a live show that could have been! -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 15:43:32 EDT From: Al Kooper Subject: Re: The Everlys (Garfunkel & Simon) Previously: > As for the Everlys, why are they only doing four songs? Is this by > choice? My mouth has remained permanently agape since recently > discovering their '60s Warner Bros. catalog. This is some of the > most amazing music ever made! I can't believe they had so few hits > during this time. Much love and respect to the Everlys for all their > astoundingly timeless music. The Eagles, early on in their headlining tours, took Roy Orbison out as an opener. He hadn't been heard live in many a year and they gave him a full set. It was INCREDIBLE!!! This makes S&G's slight of the Everlys even more embarassing. To me it's an ego thing at the Everly's expense. I do imagine they are being well compensated, however. With no disrespect to Phil, Don's voice gets better every year. Al Kooper -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 16:58:01 EDT From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: basslessness Interesting discussion on the subject of bands who eschewed bass guitar. When it comes down to recordings in the 60s, it's even more rare. Not counting songs that were folk-based to begin with and thus only made to be played on only an acoustic guitar or two, there are two full-band recordings that come to mind that are bassless. One was a big Top 40 hit: Daydream -- The Lovin' Spoonful Sister Ray -- The Velvet Underground Others? Mike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 16:42:39 EDT From: Al Kooper Subject: Re: basslessness > The Doors at least had a bass player on the records. Does anyone > know why bands thought they didn't need bass players? One less guy to pay? -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 17:07:04 EDT From: Mike McKay Subject: Re: passing Rascals A. Zweig wrote: > Seriously though, I was watching The Rascals on an episode of > Hullabaloo and I was reminded of how strange they seemed even back > when I had their records and loved them. No bass player. Plus a > guy who looked like the lead singer except he really wasn't the > lead singer. I always wondered about that. Others in this same category -- i.e., bands with a member who played percussion only (or less) and yet was not the primary lead singer: The Cryan' Shames (J.C. Hooke -- who would have had a hard time playing much else as he really did have a hook!) The Turtles (Mark Volman) The Byrds (Gene Clark...though he did sing some leads and occasionally played acoustic guitar on stage) The Hollies (Graham Nash held an unplugged acoustic guitar on stage, so that doesn't count in my book!) Skylark (their guitarist sang the lead on "Wildflower" -- meanwhile the girl and the black guy sang backups but didn't play anything) Mike -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 16:50:00 EDT From: Al Kooper Subject: Robert Nix Nick Archer: > So the guy I thought was Buddy Buie was probably Robert Nix, who > was in ARS. Now I feel 30 years retroactively stupid. Robert Nix recently relocated to Gnashville. You may even bump into your Buddy in the Pancake Pantry some A.M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 17:14:52 -0400 From: Country Paul Subject: Now playing: "Dina" at musica I've just played "Dina" by Dore Alpert (A&M 714, 1963) to musica. If pressed to name one, I'd call this my favorite 45. I personally feel this haunting performance shows the most genuine depth of emotion Herb Alpert ever recorded of all his songs that I've heard; plus the composition and arrangement are to my ear brilliant and truly progressive popular music. I don't know if this exists in stereo, so here it is in magnificent mono. I hope I haven't oversold it to you, and hope that you like it at least half as much as I do. Country Paul -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 21:22:18 -0000 From: Andy Subject: Re: basslessness / Pete records John Berg wrote: > I saw the Doors at the Whisky in May 1966 (opening for Them) and > it immediately struck me how Manzarek played the bass notes with > his left hand.... but maybe that's the best gear he could afford > at that early stage. I can tell you from experience that "kickin" bass is not so simple. I've been doing it for 35+ years now. I would think that Ray hasn't learned the art and now-a-days you'll find only a handful able to do so. Just to fill in 2 of the 3 opening on your "Pete" discography: S-1105 "But I Am Somebody - The Boice of the People" Narrated by Steve Allen S-1108 "The Warm & Groovy Sounds of" The Group I've never know anything about S-1107 and thanks Stephane for the info on S-1106 (I've been looking to fill-in that hole for over 2 years now). Andy -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Mon, 21 Jun 2004 21:19:01 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: Re: Garfunkel & Simon John Fox wrote: > I have a new appreciation for Art Garfunkel ... hits all the high > notes in the original keys of the songs ... How can you be sure they were in the original keys? gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Mon, 21 Jun 2004 18:13:26 -0400 From: Joe Nelson Subject: Re: organic music John Berg wrote: > I saw the Doors at the Whisky in May 1966 (opening for Them) and it > immediately struck me how Manzarek played the bass notes with his > left hand, as you note -- it kind of restricts what one can do > overall with melody, but maybe that's the best gear he could afford > at that early stage? Or just the fact he was never into Hammonds. The sixties were very much the heyday of the organ as a rock instrument. Because organs were more *portable* than pianos, they lent themselves perfectly to the stage. As the seventies and eighties progressed and the synths took over it became easier to fit more sound/sounds into a small space and the music became more varied, but you could really identify a group by their organ sounds -- the Rascals' trademark Hammond, Manzarek's Farfisa, etc. All the more reason we miss those days and showed up here (sigh) ... Joe Nelson (more of a guitar player himself, but the great strange axes of the sixties will wait for yet another thread ...) -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 19:41:38 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: "Get Rid Of Him" For reasons too convoluted to explain (suffice it to say, it would make S'pop's favourite go-go-ists the Actionettes very happy ladies) I am in urgent need of the song "Get Rid Of Him" in STEREO. It doesn't matter which version - the Shirelles, Dionne Warwick or (fat chance) Bernadette Castro - as long as it is in stereo. Is such a thing available on CD? If so, details please. If not, maybe some kind soul could post the track to musica, or whatever. On behalf of Tourette, Crepe Suzette, Dansette, Balconette et al, I thank you. By the way, the highlight of my Sunday evening was witnessing an over-excited Miss Balconette dancing with the one and only Nancy Sinatra at the Royal Festival Hall in London. Not only that, Nancy's keyboard player was S'pop hero Don Randi. Alas, my invite to the apres gig lig must have got lost in the post. Anyway, I've a pile of Mike Clifford, Myrna March and Azie Mortimer 45s waiting to be digitized, a pan of chicken thighs sizzling away and tennis to watch on TV. And I'm out of Zantac. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 16:32:55 +0000 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: So Goes Carole / basslessness Country Paul wrote: > Wow, gentlemen, what took you so long to play these to musica?!? I've > never heard "So Goes Love" by anybody (I know that I should know who > Shirley Abicair is by now, but I don't). What a beauty this song is! > Even in its underproduced form, it's a gem. I too had never heard "So Goes Love" before, and was thrilled to finally discover it! What a gorgeous number, with a one-listen-memorable refrain and, in this version, Carole's ever-soulful vocals. Eager to hear The Monkees' version, I've ordered the Missing Links volume it's on and, while I was at it, ordered the other two as well. I realize I should've had these all along, but a little instigation can go a long way. Mike McKay wrote: > The Cryan' Shames (J.C. Hooke -- who would have had a hard time playing > much else as he really did have a hook!) That never stopped Moulty! --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 18:20:16 -0400 From: Joe Nelson Subject: Re: lead singers who didn't always sing lead Mike McKay wrote: > Others in this same category -- i.e., bands with a member who played > percussion only (or less) and yet was not the primary lead singer: > The Cryan' Shames (J.C. Hooke -- who would have had a hard time playing > much else as he really did have a hook!) ISTR a certain Brit Inv band whose drummer had no hands, only hooks. The name escapes me. > The Turtles (Mark Volman) Played saxophone as well as percussion. > The Byrds (Gene Clark...though he did sing some leads and occasionally > played acoustic guitar on stage) I was surprised he didn't play guitar more often. Must have been a sound concept. > The Hollies (Graham Nash held an unplugged acoustic guitar on stage, > so that doesn't count in my book!) Holding a guitar and playing are two different things -- although if you think about it Ray Davies of the Kinks (who WAS plugged in) didn't play most of the time either. > Skylark (their guitarist sang the lead on "Wildflower" -- meanwhile > the girl and the black guy sang backups but didn't play anything) Very common in R&B oriented groups. How many can you think of where there was a distinct lead singer but the other members didn't play anything? A couple other examples come to mind: People: Larry Norman came into the group knowing enough piano and guitar to hold his own on stage, yet ended up just singing -- and at that sharing leads with the guitarist (often within the same song). Elton John's band featured percussionist Ray Cooper much of the time. >From incarnations of the group where he was absent altogether to a couple of lineups that were just him and Elton, the boss obviously thought of him as more than a guy who stood there and shook a tambourine. The search continues ... Joe Nelson -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 18:16:46 -0700 (PDT) From: Artie Wayne Subject: Re: basslessness As much as I hate to admit it, I've only learned recently (in the seventies) how important a bass is in recordings. I produced many records in the early sixties without having a clue ... much less a bass. I remember that when Larry Uttal bought my "Midnight Mary"master for Amy Records, he asked me if I could bring up the bass. I just looked at him and said, "What bass?" Larry smiled and handed me $15 to add one and do a new mix. Fortunately I had a few friends who helped me out and we had enough change left over for a couple of hot dogs and some coconut champagne from the store across the street from the Brill Building. Regards, Artie Wayne -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 18:00:45 -0400 From: Dennis Diken Subject: Re: basslessness / Cozy speaks / Beach Boys covers Mike McKay wrote: > Interesting discussion on the subject of bands who eschewed bass guitar. > When it comes down to recordings in the 60s, it's even more rare. I've always thought there was no discernable bass guitar on "Let's Dance On," from the first Monkees LP. re: recent discussion of "Topsy Pt 2": Are any of you familiar with Hal Blaine's "Topsy '65" on the fabulous Sloan/ Barri-produced "Drums! Drums! A Go Go" album? Very cool (check my e-mail address)! re: Cozy Cole's version: I always assumed it was Cozy himself on the slate (ditto "Topsy Pt. 1" and "Bad," also by CC). Don't know for sure, though. Going back aways, here are a couple more Beach Boys covers: "You're So Good To Me" by The Kit Kats "Aren't You Glad" by Peggy March Best, Dennis Diken -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 22:31:26 EDT From: Al Kooper Subject: Re: Sick Manny's Gym Dan Nowicki wrote: > Speaking of Al Kooper and Musicor, has this record ever come up on > Spectropop before?: "Sick Manny's Gym" (Alan Kooper) b/w "Plunkin'" > (E. Krackow - A. Kooper). Sorry if I missed any discussion, but this sounds > like a fun (bizarre) session. The novelty A-side is credited to Leo > DeLyon and The Musclemen and the instro flip is credited just to The > Musclemen. Another Aaron Schroeder and Wally Gold production. > Definitely bent genius at work. I knew sooner or later one of youse guys would pull this item out. I wrote this in math class in high school. It's a takeoff on Vic Tanny's gym chain from the early '60s. It was the very first release on Musicor (!), and is pretty rare. My first band, The AristoCats, does the backing. We're from Queens, y'all. Young Al Kooper -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 20:51:17 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: Re: basslessness The Teddy Bears' "To Know Him Is To Love Him" has no bass. gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 20:59:13 -0700 From: Gary Myers Subject: Re: basslessness John Berg wrote: > Anyone with more than a passing familiarity with the genre of > Hammond B-3 players can tell you that a decent B-3 player can > very adequately handle the bass-note playing role in a band. Capably I guess, but there's nothing like a real bass. Even staying with the keyboards (whether organ or whatever), in my experience (44 years of gigs), those who play a good left-hand bass outshine (and vastly outnumber) those who play good pedals. Probably the majority of gigs I've done for the past 22 years have used keyboards with left-hand bass, but it's always a treat to actually have a (good) bass player besides the keyboards. gem -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 21:10:18 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: backstage with Brother Ray A forward from Bill Turner: As for Ray Charles, in 1970 I was playing with a Brooklyn-based band The Ox-Bow Incident. One night we all jumped in the bass player's Volkswagen van and headed to Central Park, where Ray Charles was performing that night at the Wollman Skating Rink Summer Concert Series. During the intermission we all decided to wander around, and I somehow wound up in the backstage area. Lo and behold--there was Ray Charles standing all by himself, alone! I walked up to him and said hello, introducing myself. He smiled, and put his arms around my head in a semi- headlock, and we proceeded to talk about his albums "Modern Sounds In Country & Western Music, Volumes 1 and 2." He told me about how he grew up listening to the Grand Ole Opry every week, and how he always loved country music. He told me his favorite artists were Hank Williams, Don Gibson, and Grandpa Jones! Just for the record, Ray's biggest hit records of his entire career were written by Nashville writers: "I'm Busted" was written by Harlan Howard, "Take These Chains from My Heart" was written by Hank Williams, and his biggest hit, "I Can't Stop Loving You", by Don Gibson. It was these recordings that put him over the top in the early 1960s and allowed him to cross over into the mainstream. Anyhow, we'd been speaking for about 10 minutes when these two guys came out of the dressing room trailer and called out to him, "C'mon man, let's get back in here." Ray answered, "Wait a minute, man, I'm talkin' to this cat here." We hugged and I walked him back to his two band members at the trailer, and he completed the second half of his concert. When I met up with the other Ox-Bow Incident members after the show, I told them about my conversation with Ray Charles ... and they didn't believe me! Correct me if I'm wrong, but all these years later I think that these two albums still remain Ray's biggest sellers. They were an artistic 'crossover triumph', have stood the test of time, and still sound every bit as good today. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 23:38:13 -0700 (PDT) From: Norm D. Plume Subject: Hank Marvin radio interview For those interested in The Shadows, the website of BBC London's "Breakfast With Danny Baker" show offers a short but highly entertaining radio interview with Hank Marvin (from 23/04/04), archived (in RA format) at: http://tinyurl.com/yu5cc At the same page you'll find many other interviews you might also enjoy, including Joe Brown, Marty Wilde, Kenny Lynch, Gary Brooker, Carolyn Hester, Lamont Dozier, Les Reed & Roger Cook, The Zombies, Linda Gail Lewis, Charlie Watts, Sparks, Geno Washington, Chris Rea, Merril Osmond, Peter Frampton and Richie Havens. Norm D. Plume -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Wed, 23 Jun 2004 09:44:04 -0000 From: Rob Stride Subject: Terry Rice-Milton I need to get in touch with Terry Rice-Milton, from Cupids Inspiration, for a project that I'm working on. The phone number I have for him is out of date. Has anybody got any current contact details for him? Thanks, Rob Stride -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Tue, 22 Jun 2004 12:18:56 -0700 (PDT) From: Steve Harvey Subject: Re: fading Nuggets Shawn wrote: > Gus Dewey of The Gestures and Tom Nystrom of The Underbeats > passed away within the past few months. Anyone familiar with > Soma Records will know of these groups. Death must be stalking the "Nuggets" crowd, as Howard "Richard" Tepp, lead singer for Richard & The Young Lions, just died. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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