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Spectropop - Digest Number 1505



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               SPECTROPOP - Spectacular! Retro! Pop!
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

      1. [HOLD FOR NOW PLS - mp] Barney Kessel R.I.P.
           From: S'pop Team 
      2. Re: best nyc records stores anyone?
           From: Phil Hall 
      3. Re: Pitney lookalikes
           From: Al Kooper 
      4. Re: "Love Of The Common People"?
           From: Austin Roberts 
      5. Re: Gene Pitney
           From: Lyn 
      6. Robin McNamara
           From: Laura Pinto 
      7. Re: Superbabs
           From: (That) Alan Gordon 
      8. Re: Gene Pitney
           From: Austin Roberts 
      9. Bobby & I
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     10. Ronnie Allen, Love of the Common People
           From: Bob Rashkow 
     11. Re: rex in NY / Joshie Jo / Teddy Bears / Godz / Relic Rack
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     12. Favorite obscure Pitney track??
           From: Al Kooper 
     13. NY record shops
           From: Jim Allio 
     14. Re: Favorite obscure Pitney track??
           From: Mikey 
     15. Re: Love Of The Common People
           From: Mikey 
     16. Re: Favorite obscure Pitney track??
           From: Jeffrey Mlinscek 
     17. Lee Hazlewood Promotional EP
           From: Holly Cara Price 
     18. Re: Superbabs
           From: Hal Muskat 
     19. Re: Joshie Jo Armstead
           From: Chris Stovall Brown 
     20. "Celebrate" controversey in the making (paging Mr. Gordon, Alan Gordon...)
           From: Joe Nelson 
     21. Re: Favorite obscure Pitney track??
           From: Dave O'Gara 
     22. Re: Bobby & I -- correction
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     23. Re: Favorite obscure Pitney track??
           From: Phil X Milstein 
     24. Re: NY record shops
           From: Richard Williams 
     25. Re: Songwriter Rudy Clark
           From: Mick Patrick 


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Message: 1 Date: Sun, 30 May 2004 14:49:29 +0100 From: S'pop Team Subject: Barney Kessel R.I.P. Dear Members, As reported earlier, legendary guitar virtuoso Barney Kessel passed away on May 6. He was 80. A 7,000 word tribute, written by his friend Harvey Kubernik, is the latest installation at S'pop Remembers: http://www.spectropop.com/remembers/BKobit.htm It's required reading. R.I.P. The S'pop Team -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 2 Date: Sat, 29 May 2004 22:51:44 -0000 From: Phil Hall Subject: Re: best nyc records stores anyone? > Calling all your collective experience: what are best record stores > in New York for 60s pop/pop-sike/psych 45s, boots, comps even cdrs? Check out The House Of Oldies http://www.houseofoldies.com/home.html or Bleecker Bob's http://www.bleeckerbobs.com/ in Greenwich Village. Also, Mooncurser Records in The Bronx. Phil H. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 3 Date: Sat, 29 May 2004 20:19:17 EDT From: Al Kooper Subject: Re: Pitney lookalikes > P.S. I've never noticed this in photographs, but in old video clips > from the '60s, Gene strikingly resembles Bishop Fulton J. Sheen of > "Life Is Worth Living" fame, apart from the church finery... Uhhhh - I gotta go with Pete Rose - current version. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 4 Date: Sat, 29 May 2004 21:49:29 EDT From: Austin Roberts Subject: Re: "Love Of The Common People"? > Also who did "Love Of The Common People" originally? This version > is on the, unusual for the Chess Label, US only 1967 LP, called > 'Petal Pushers' of all UK groups. I think the Winstons (Color Him Father). Austin R. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 5 Date: Sun, 30 May 2004 02:23:35 -0000 From: Lyn Subject: Re: Gene Pitney For a start, I love Gene Pitney just for coming to our town, of all places, since we're a bit off the international circuit. We've seen him three times in recent years, and he gets better every time. But speaking of newer works, last time he did a Robbie Williams song, "Angels", which he'd first sung for a British TV project (I don't have the details: something about younger artists being linked with older ones). It worked beautifully, and fitted perfectly into the Pitney repertoire. I can't see any evidence of it being released, but someone else here might know better. Lyn -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 6 Date: Sun, 30 May 2004 12:32:55 -0000 From: Laura Pinto Subject: Robin McNamara Hi, fellow S'poppers, A few weeks ago (three, to be exact), I posted "Got to Believe in Love: The Robin McNamara Interview" on my site, Oldies Connection. Since the article went online, Robin and I have updated it, with a page called "Hair Salon" on which Robin shares more memories of his days with "Hair" (post-interview anecdotes), and a second page, "My Convictions," on which the ol' hippie rhapsodizes about sex, religion, drugs, the state of the world - in other words, hot topics that most people shy away from discussing, at least on the World Wide Web. But Robin, as you'll find out, isn't most people. Click on the link below to visit the new pages: http://lpintop.tripod.com/oldiesconnection/id53.html If you want to post questions or comments for Robin, there's a link to a message board at the bottom of the "My Convictions" page. Enjoy, Laura -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 7 Date: Sun, 30 May 2004 09:33:14 -0700 From: (That) Alan Gordon Subject: Re: Superbabs Gem, the Streisand home we all gathered at was the one in Beverly Hills. After we rehearsed all the guys took turns playing a song. It was really great. Best, That Alan -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 8 Date: Sun, 30 May 2004 12:55:53 EDT From: Austin Roberts Subject: Re: Gene Pitney > I WANNA LOVE MY LIFE AWAY? In fact (and this could of course be wrong, > for I am so fallible), didn't he do it in his garage? > Was cut as a demo in a NY studio...probably Allegro in 1650 B'way. Was it his first hit under his name? Austin R. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 9 Date: Sun, 30 May 2004 16:02:07 -0400 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Bobby & I The (somewhat) recent talk about Bobby & Laurie reminded me of another '60s boy-girl duo who called themselves Bobby & I. Their self-titled 1968 Liberty album is a true California-pop delight. "Bobby" was actually the woman, last name of Burch, and "I" was Ken Fishler, who also their keyboardist and vocal arranger. The album was produced and instrumentally arranged by Tommy Oliver, a name I'm not otherwise familiar with. Other musicians are Rod Ellicott on bass, Jim Gordon on drums and Dave Cohen on guitar. The duo was discovered playing the bistros of S.F., to which I assume they returned when their recording career failed to take flight. The only reason for such failure I can detect is being a half-step out of time, as, despite the mildly psychedelic tinge it lends their music, 1968 was hardly the ripest time for such sweet and happy sounds to find a large audience. Fishler wrote or co-wrote a batch of great originals, highlighted by the lead-off track "Love Is For The Sharing," which I've played to musica. It's followed on the album by his one writing collab with Bobby, "5:09," which I've got in wait should there be a call for it. Covers include Joni Mitchell's "Michael From The Mountains" (which if I recall correctly from my recent read of Al Kooper's memoir, is the song he'd earlier pitched to Judy Collins by way of trying to introduce Miss Mitchell to the general public, only to have her instead emphasize "Both Sides Now" ... but I digress), "Everyone's Gone To The Moon," "Hurt So Bad," "Mohair Sam," "Sweet Talkin' Guy," and, my favorite among the covers, "Best Of Both Worlds." Digging around on the 'Net, I find mention of two later singles by them, both also on Imperial. Two album tracks, "Catching The Time In Your Hand" / "Love Is For The Sharing" was released c.1969, and in 1970 came two album tracks, "On Rose Walk" / (and here the story links up with a more recent thread) "Be Young Be Foolish Be Happy." If anyone's got this latter single, I'd love to hear it, especially that Tams cover. Dig, --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 10 Date: Sun, 30 May 2004 16:15:26 EDT From: Bob Rashkow Subject: Ronnie Allen, Love of the Common People I believe among several different groups that covered Love of the Common People were The Winstons, the R&B group on Metromedia that had a pretty big hit with "Color Him Father." (Unless, of course, that isn't the same song being discussed--I wouldn't be surprised!!!) Ronnie, I remember hearing "Your Cat Can Do The Cube" on "Dr. Demento" back in '82. The guy tries it on his own cat and gets VERY frustrated. I seem to remember you saying "Oh! Here comes Abby! Hey, Abby, I've got something pretty for you! Want to take a 'crack' at it?" If only I could, I would give Gloria Lynne the moon, the stars, and $100K a year to live on. Kudos to you, Gloria, we love you and send our best! Bobster -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 11 Date: Sun, 30 May 2004 15:10:14 -0400 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: rex in NY / Joshie Jo / Teddy Bears / Godz / Relic Rack > Calling all your collective experience: what are best record stores > in New York for 60s pop/pop-sike/psych 45s, boots, comps even cdrs? Other Music is worth any Spectropopper's time time. Not sure of the exact location, but it's downtown somewhere, and will of course be in the phone book. A visit to Tower Records usually pays some dividends, as well. Keep your credit card handy. James Botticelli wrote: > The uptempo track is available on an anthology of her work on > Collectables (sic). Her dead ballads are nicer. Chicago-based singer/ > writer I believe. You can see the Armstead writing credits on lottsa > soul 45's of the sixties and early 70's once you start reading the > writer's names. She seems to have disappeared after '72 unless someone > has further info.... Robert Pruter wrote a thorough retrospective on the career of Joshie Jo Armstead for the summer '86 issue of the wonderful Soul Survivor mag. My abiding recollection of that piece was that she did a lot of behind-the- scenes work for Motown, and that her own recording career was more or less an afterthought, but it's been so long since I've read it that I could be way off-base. I'll be happy to treat into my zines closet, dig it out and scan the article, if anyone's innarested. I also seem to recall a shot of her as an Ikette! Edited by Richard Pack, Soul Survivor was a Canadian publication that was too good to last very long. I have a lot of issues, but not all. I would love to exchange photocopies with someone in order to finish out each other's collections of them. Joe Nelson, quoting from Dore catalogue at bsnpubs.com: > Unfortunately, all stereo did for the Teddy Bears was > to reveal in painful detail the lack of singing talent in the group ... I never knew The Teddy Bears were thought to be such lousy singers. Am I the only one who didn't know they were "bad"? (It wouldn't be the first time, if so.) Does this mean I should think less of Annette/Carol's work on "My Baby Looks But He Doesn't Touch" than I do? Or was it just the two boys who were such crappy singers? Leslie Fradkin wrote: > Herb Abramson. Wow! A name from my past as well! I recorded dozens of > singles and album stuff at Herb's studio. The Godz, The Left Banke ... Les, this might be a tad off-topic for Spectropop, so I hope the other members will forgive me for asking you for any anecdotes or recollections of your work with The Godz. Their three ESP-Disks are among the strangest and most fun of that era. Mike Rashkow wrote: > Years ago; Times Square Records and Colony. There also used to be a > real good store in Hackensack or near Hackensack, but I can't remember > the name. Relic Rack, which, if I recall correctly, spawned the Relic line of doo- wop reissues, although the two separated from one another after a while. Relic Rack shut down a few months ago, a sad event which prompted a brief thread in these parts. --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 12 Date: Sun, 30 May 2004 15:47:47 EDT From: Al Kooper Subject: Favorite obscure Pitney track?? OK, come outa the basements, lads... Favorite obscure Pitney trax? Mine is One Day. Also love Donna Means Heartbreak & Marianne. I covered One Day on a Pitney tribute album about three years ago. Wot fun!!!!! Al Kooper -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 13 Date: Sun, 30 May 2004 20:03:40 EDT From: Jim Allio Subject: NY record shops I'm planning another trip to NYC in September and appreciate the tips on current oldies record outlets there. I remember well the afternoon in fall 1975 when I wandered into (I think it was) House of Oldies or Bleeker Oldies or something like that in search of Lesley Gore picture sleeves from the 60s. The affable, long hair behind the counter turned out to be one of my favorite music writers, Robert Christgau, and we had a long chat about our mutual affection for Gore and other girl groups. I came away with every picture sleeve I wanted and a wonderful memory. I do have a burning off-topic question: where in Manhattan can I find the absolute best either Meatball Pizza and/or Best Meatball/Italian Sausage pizza? That will be a serious quest while I am there this time. Please reply off-list. Jim Allio -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 14 Date: Mon, 31 May 2004 08:02:21 -0400 From: Mikey Subject: Re: Favorite obscure Pitney track?? Al Kooper: > OK, come outa the basements, lads... Favorite obscure Pitney trax? > Mine is One Day. Also love Donna Means Heartbreak & Marianne. I > covered One Day on a Pitney tribute album about three years ago. > Wot fun!!!!! Favorite obscure Pitney? No challenge!! "Lips Were Redder on You". Dig the crazy Joe Meek spring reverb on the guitar!!! Mikey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 15 Date: Mon, 31 May 2004 08:03:12 -0400 From: Mikey Subject: Re: Love Of The Common People Wayne Newton did a pretty nice job covering this song also, back in '66. Mikey -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 16 Date: Mon, 31 May 2004 08:28:10 -0400 From: Jeffrey Mlinscek Subject: Re: Favorite obscure Pitney track?? Al Kooper wrote: > OK, come outa the basements, lads... Favorite obscure Pitney trax? > Mine is One Day. Also love Donna Means Heartbreak & Marianne. I > covered One Day on a Pitney tribute album about three years ago. > Wot fun!!!!! Mine is the Leiber/Stoller composed "Take it Like a Man". This was the b-side to "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance". Jeff M -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 17 Date: Mon, 31 May 2004 07:29:33 -0400 From: Holly Cara Price Subject: Lee Hazlewood Promotional EP I am looking for a promotional EP done by Lee Hazlewood on Mercury, possibly a promo for his album "Trouble Is A Lonesome Town." The tracks are: 1: Who Is Lee Hazlewood. 2: Moved >From Place Of Birth. 3: His Girl In High School. 4: In The Army. 5: Disc Jockey. 6: Record Biz. Does anyone out there have this? Holly -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 18 Date: Sun, 30 May 2004 13:37:00 -0700 From: Hal Muskat Subject: Re: Superbabs That Alan Gordon: > ... the Streisand home we all gathered at was the one in Beverly > Hills. After we rehearsed all the guys took turns playing a song. > It was really great. What did you play? Sounds like a fine evening. Eat there too? Hal -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 19 Date: Mon, 31 May 2004 13:09:16 -0000 From: Chris Stovall Brown Subject: Re: Joshie Jo Armstead Just resubscribed to this group and saw the queries about Jo/JOshie Armstead. I've been in contact recently with Joshie and actually forwarded Jimmy Botticelli's message to her. I've given her S'pop contact info if she wants to chime in. Hope this helps. Chris Stovall Brown -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 20 Date: Mon, 31 May 2004 09:26:57 -0400 From: Joe Nelson Subject: "Celebrate" controversey in the making (paging Mr. Gordon, Alan Gordon...) I saw something pop up in rec.music.rock+pop+rnb.1970s newsgroup which triggered something. Here's my response, including a message imported from this forum. So Danny Hutton and Chuck Negron took credit on the Three Dog Night releases for writing "Celebrate", or is somebody mistaken? Here's where this group, with it's insider roster, shows it's superiority - and to think certain r.m.rprnb posters have criticed us as "boring". You decide - Joe Nelson --------------------------------snip---------------------------------- Irene Jackson wrote: > Three Dog Night didn't wtheir own material.rite > There are rarely any absolutes in rock & roll. Lead singer Chuck > Negron and Danny Hutton did write "Celebrate," which was a #15 hit > for Three Dog Night in 1970. But that's the one exception, as far > as their hits go. I replied: > Interesting post. Clark Besch recently posted this to the Spectropop > discussion group at Yahoogroups: Clark's original post: > The talk of the Feminine Complex got me thinking about some of the > obscure female group sounds of 68/9. Posted to Musica was one that > would just fit with the limited space, "Have You Tried Love" by > Celebration. It was released on United Artists 50467 and for > December, 1968, seemed to incorporate much of the pop sounds of the > day. I hear the Happenings, Cowsills, Love Generation and the theme > to Tv shows of the era, as well as other pop influences of the day. > It was written and produced by Tony Michaels and Vinny Gormann for > Mirage City Productions. I assume Tony and Vinny were group members > of an obviously male/female configuration. I actually like the B > side better, "Never Mind the Rain", if anyone would want to hear it > too. Alan Gordon may well know about this group, as one of their > followups would be his "Celebrity Ball" (aka "Celebrate") on UA 50626 > released in February, 1970. The timing was not good, as Three Dog > Night's retitled version was released on 45 and buried Celebration's > "Celebrity". Three Dog's version was itself a case of bad timing > too. Being the third single from a 6 month old album that had > already spawned two top 10 45's ("Easy to be Hard"/"Eli's Coming") , > had seen the group release a "live" album since then, it would seem > it amazing that all the airplay for "Celebrate" was able to get it up > to #15 on the Hot 100 eventually. Certainly the most played of the > three hits, one wonders if it'd been released first if it had been > the group's first #1 record. Even in 20/20 hindsight, Alan had a > real feather in his cap there. So who wrote the song really, Alan Gordon or Hutton and Negron? Joe -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 21 Date: Mon, 31 May 2004 13:41:00 -0000 From: Dave O'Gara Subject: Re: Favorite obscure Pitney track?? Al Kooper wrote: > OK, come outa the basements, lads... Favorite obscure Pitney trax? One of my favorite Pitney tracks is the last one he charted; She Let's Her Hair Down (Early in the Morning). It was rleased in December of 1969, a great pop tune IMHO, but it stalled at #89... shoulda been bigger! By the way, Pitney fans, Gene has a string of appearances scheduled at Mohegan Sun in CT, June 23 through June 27. Dave 0' -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 22 Date: Mon, 31 May 2004 09:49:57 -0400 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: Bobby & I -- correction I wrote: > ... and in 1970 came two album tracks, "On Rose Walk" / (and here > the story links up with a more recent thread) "Be Young Be Foolish > Be Happy." If anyone's got this latter single, I'd love to hear it, > especially that Tams cover. Ah, I meant "non-album tracks." --Ph.M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 23 Date: Mon, 31 May 2004 09:47:41 -0400 From: Phil X Milstein Subject: Re: Favorite obscure Pitney track?? Al Kooper wrote: > OK, come outa the basements, lads... Favorite obscure Pitney trax? I go for "The Last Two People On Earth." --Phil M. -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 24 Date: Mon, 31 May 2004 15:37:10 +0100 From: Richard Williams Subject: Re: NY record shops > Calling all your collective experience: what are best record stores > in New York for 60s pop/pop-sike/psych 45s, boots, comps even cdrs? Colony was still pretty good the last time I went. But Rockit Scientist in the Village has everything you mention in abundance, plus clued-up staff. Richard Williams -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
Message: 25 Date: Mon, 31 May 2004 13:08:31 +0100 From: Mick Patrick Subject: Re: Songwriter Rudy Clark Someone was asking about the great songwriter Rudy Clark. One of his compositions is currently playing @ musica: The Bracelets "Waddle, Waddle" (Congress 104, 1962). Some of you might recall this track from the movie Hairspray. It didn't make it to the soundtrack album. If you like Claudine Clark or the Rocky Fellers, you'll dig this too: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/spectropop/files/musica/ Rudy (real name Rudolph) has cropped up in discussion here before, usually in conjunction with vocalist James Ray. A quick search of the S'pop archives throws up the following: ------------------------------------------- Life was grim for James Ray (real name James Ray Raymond) until a talented new songwriter and a dynamic A & R man entered his world and changed it around. Having already enjoyed Top 30 hits under his own name and as the iminence grise behind both the Fireflies and Dicky Doo & the Don'ts, by 1961 Gerry Granahan had founded the Caprice label and immediately charted again with his discoveries the Angels and Janie Grant. Delivering demos to the Caprice office on a regular basis was Rudy Clark who, in addition to being the local mail carrier, was an enthusiastic songwriter in his spare time. Clark would frequently sit at the piano and play his latest compositions for Granahan who advised him that his songs were good but his voice was not and to bring in someone who could really sing. Clark took Granahan at his word and brought in James Ray whom he had discovered performing in a club. The singer was destitute at the time and living rough on the rooftop of an apartment block. Granahan saw in the five-foot-tall Washington DC-born 20-year- old a talent of Ray Charles-like proportions and immediately signed him to Caprice, bought him a new wardrobe of clothes and found him somewhere to live. Before the year was over singer Ray and composer Clark were basking in the glory of "If You Gotta Make A Fool Of Somebody" riding high on the pop charts and in the R & B Top 10. Subsequent James Ray releases included the hit "Itty Bitty Pieces", "Got My Mind Set On You" (a huge hit for George Harrison many years later) and the original version of Ben E. King & Dee Dee Sharp's "We Got A Thing Going On". Rudy Clark went on to sign with Bobby Darin's T.M. Music publishing company and write such great songs as "It's In His Kiss" and "Good Lovin'". "If You Gotta Make A Fool Of Somebody" was successfully revived by Brit-popsters Freddie & the Dreamers in 1963 and three years later in soulful style by Maxine Brown. James Ray Raymond died in the '60s from an overdose of drugs. What a waste. ------------------------------------------- Rudy Clark composed a slew of excellent numbers, frequently with songwriting partner Artie Resnick. Off the top of my head, in addition to those mentioned above, here are just a few of my personal favourites: Beg Me - Chuck Jackson (Wand) Spanish Boy - Merry Clayton (Capitol) Fool Fool Fool - Barbara Acklin (Brunswick) I Found My Place - Reparata & the Delrons (World Artists) Deeper - The Rubies (VJ) Blow Joe - The Angels (Caprice) Baby I Dig Love - Rudy Lewis (Atlantic) Am I Ever Gonna See My Baby Again - The Sweet Inspirations (Atlantic) Other versions of most of these songs exist; I've listed my favourites. Before anyone corrects me, I should point out that James Ray's recording debut was as Little Jimmy Ray in 1959. Details are: "Make Her Mine" bw "You Need To Fall In Love" Galliant 1001 Memory tells me that more information about Rudy Clark is to be found in Bobby Darin biographies, of which there are several. Hey la, Mick Patrick -------------------[ archived by Spectropop ]-------------------
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